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    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
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line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Supporting the most marginalised this Christmas communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Supporting the most marginalised this Christmas We have almost made it through another challenging year at DCM. I am proud of the way our team has delivered our vision – for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving – regardless of everything the ongoing pandemic has thrown at us. I am also proud of the courage displayed by the people we work with. They come to DCM because they genuinely feel welcome here, and because the practical mahi we do makes a huge difference in their lives. But it is when whānau are housed that true transformation takes place. This is why DCM has always believed in ‘Housing First’ – dramatically improved wellbeing comes from having a permanent roof over your head. You shouldn’t have to earn a home – you have a human right to have one. At DCM, it all starts at Te Hāpai, our hauora-focussed, week day services at 2 Lukes Lane. Read on for the story of just one day at Te Hāpai, where the most marginalised and vulnerable people in our city come. Stephen <!-- --> Another day in the life of Te Hāpai Te Hāpai – which means “to lift up” – is a safe, welcoming place where people who are rough sleeping in Wellington are supported on a journey to housing and wellbeing. DCM began Te Hāpai in 2015 amid growing concerns from the community when a number of Wellington drop-in services closed. But nobody just ‘drops in’ to DCM – our hope is that everyone who walks through our door is lifted up, so they can then engage with the services available at Te Hāpai every week day. These services have a hauora-focus – by providing a safe and supportive environment, we build relationships to encourage people to take the steps needed to be well, and to thrive. Tea, coffee and kai helps, and Tanoa has carefully set up everything for the day. Our team know that kai is a great way to build connections with people. It can be easier to have a chat about someone’s housing needs over a cuppa, especially on a cold Wellington day. DCM’s on-site team gather at 8:45am for a briefing. Rowan is our team leader today, and talks us through what’s happening. We have a carving course upstairs, some manuhiri visiting, and Jo from MSD will also join us, to work through any issues people may have, from getting on a benefit or on the housing waitlist, through to accessing a special needs grant. There are a couple of whānau the team are looking out for today, including someone Rowan and Jenny need to catch up with. Everyone is welcome at Te Hāpai, even if they are excluded from other services. We employ a ‘high tolerance, low threshold’ approach. If someone is having a bad day, they are still welcome to come back on another day. Accessibility and inclusivity are important parts of DCM’s kaupapa. At 9am, Clifton, who is taking part in the carving course, calls us to waiata with one of the instruments the team has created. We know that these sounds were once heard frequently around our building on Lukes Lane, which sits on the site of the historic Te Aro Pā. The entire DCM team gathers outside for waiata. Whaea Jenny, DCM’s Toa, leads the gathering crowd, letting us know what is happening at Te Hāpai today. Jenny reminds everyone to treat each other with respect – “Remember – manaakitanga, whānau!” “Kia ora, nan.” At the door, everyone’s name is recorded. Kaimahi ask how everyone is feeling; if anyone says they’re unwell, we will chat to them out in the courtyard. COVID is still a feature in Aotearoa, and DCM takes extra precautions. For example, if someone would like to see one of the Te Aro Health nurses, they will need to mask up. At the welcome desk, things quickly get busy. A man walks up – “I need to talk to someone about my housing.” Kaimahi take him to a private space to talk through the issues he is facing. Someone else says he has a toothache and needs to see the dentist. DCM has its own emergency dental service, but because it relies on the expertise of volunteer dentists, is only available once or twice a week. He is booked in to come back for treatment on another day. Others are here today for kai, but especially for kōrero. Carl likes to make and share his own crosswords, but today he shares an anagram – ‘DUMP OLD RANT’. Carl says the words are a hint at who this political figure may be. Te Hāpai is a place where DCM’s teams can both refer, and – helpfully – find people. DCM’s Toru Atu (Outreach) team connects with people who are rough sleeping and street begging wherever they may happen to be. They often send people down to Te Hāpai, where members of their team provide familiar faces. Kai helps as a drawcard, as does the free internet, and all the practical programmes DCM provides. Need ID? A bank account? Food parcel? Housing? Nurse, audiologist, dentist? You’ve come to the right place! DCM does it all, and does whatever it takes, to connect whānau to the supports they need. Other DCM teams pop by Te Hāpai to find whānau. Aro Mai Housing First kaimahi catch up with people here, especially if they need to access one of the many on-site health services. Today Johnny has dropped in, and Jenny gives his key worker Penny a call to come by and see him. Penny works with DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) team, supporting newly housed and vulnerable tenants within their own communities. Penny encourages some of these whānau to come to Te Hāpai on a Monday or Friday when Te Awatea – which means “the awakening of the dawn” – is running. Te Awatea is a group that aims to reduce the harm associated with substance abuse. People are welcome to come and go from the meeting, but 1-1 counselling is also available when people are ready to take the next step and talk to one of DCM’s expert AOD practitioners. DCM also receives visitors from many other agencies and services. Often nurses from TACT (Team for Assertive Community Treatment) come by, looking for whānau in need of their monthly depot – slow-release medication to help treat people for mental illnesses. Just as we have with MSD today, DCM will make a private room available for the TACT Team. Accessibility is what it’s all about at Te Hāpai, but perhaps most important is inclusivity. No one is judged here – and everyone is made to feel welcome. DCM takes this inclusivity to the next level by employing people who have been homeless themselves – their commitment to doing what it takes to become well and then go on to support others on a journey to housing and wellbeing is inspiring. Our day is winding down at Te Hāpai, and participants in the carving course are ready for some lunch. Like many of the endeavours we undertake at Te Hāpai, this mahi is only possible thanks to donations from the people of Wellington. One example is the St. John’s in the City Outreach Committee who funded our carving course, providing access to culture that is often absent for the whānau DCM works with. We have enjoyed seeing the participants in the carving course thrive – having grown in confidence, they will now go on to share their knowledge with others. Carving course at DCM: Sam from Wānanga Taonga Puoro ki Pōneke led us with his beautiful and gentle way of teaching, while we grew in confidence sharing this experience together. Outside in the courtyard Matt bumps into Piripi, who is currently rough sleeping. “What do you think of Te Hāpai – do you feel lifted up when you come here?” Piripi gets straight to the point: “DCM is awesome – you’re always there when we need you. It’s a place where everyone can come, because everyone is welcome. There are people out there who are kind of stuck, but your staff never give up on anyone.” For DCM’s kaimahi, it’s never just another day at the office. Our vision is for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued, and thriving. We feel privileged to see this vision become a reality each and every day at the very special place that is Te Hāpai. <!-- --> We need your help more than ever We are worried about our whānau in the face of the rising cost of living. When you already have so little to begin with, the shocks from global crises will have a greater impact in every way. But DCM will be here to support them, and we know you will too. Our Te Hāpai service is not funded by central or local government contracts – but by YOU. This is why DCM’s byline is “Together we can end homelessness”. If you are in a position to help, here are some ways you can support us: Support DCM Together, in these most challenging of times, we will continue to empower those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless to reach their housing and social aspirations. Ngā mihi o te tau hou ki a tātou, Stephen Turnock  Manahautū <!-- --> Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
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    • Weekly Bulletin: Staying connected as a church - 13 November 2022
      • Kia ora St John’s whānau, This Sunday we have a Baptism, celebrate Communion and a special guest preacher (see below), and we will consider how much we rate human wisdom in relation to God’s power! <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > If you want to read the Bible readings before Sunday, they are: Isaiah 12: 2-6 and 1 Corinthians 2:4-5 Children start at 10am with their peer group in the St John’s Centre and join in Communion later. The Youth Group will stay in the whole service this Sunday, to hear Dr Gray Manicom. If you can’t gather in the city, and you want to join the worship service via Zoom, here are the details to access the live-stream: Zoom Meeting ID: 370 260 759Passcode: worship The link to join the Zoom worship service is below. https://us02web.zoom.us/j/370260759?pwd=b2ZkajZ5d28rTy9EN1VKZDJUM3N4dz09   If using your phone: dial 04 886 0026 (Meeting ID: 370 260 759#, Passcode: 1560107#) This is the link to the printable Service Sheet  <a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/c2g9klv741oqk46/13th%20November%202022%20Order%20of%20Service.pdf?dl=0" class="sqs-block-button-element--medium sqs-button-element--primary sqs-block-button-element" > Printable Service Sheet <a href="https://us02web.zoom.us/j/370260759?pwd=b2ZkajZ5d28rTy9EN1VKZDJUM3N4dz09" class="sqs-block-button-element--medium sqs-button-element--primary sqs-block-button-element" > Link to Zoom Service If worshipping via Zoom, please be prepared for Communion at home with your bread and cup. <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > VISITING MATHEMATICIAN We are delighted to be hosting Dr Gray Manicom for a visit at St John’s in the City this weekend (12th & 13th November)There will be three opportunities to hear him: on Saturday at 3pm (for students), in the Sunday morning service, and an informal presentation after the service. Dr Gray Manicom is a mathematician with interests in dynamical systems. His PhD is in the study of memory effects in heteroclinic networks. He is a research fellow in the Department of Physics at the University of Auckland, modelling and investigating the spread of the COVID-19 epidemic on a network. He loves cricket, movies and talking about ideas. Please help us share the Saturday event for students… <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > ‘Uses of Mathematics today: How Mathematics helps solve the world’s problems’Can 42 actually be the answer to the ultimate question? Can an equation take over the world? Can mathematics unlock lockdowns and quarantine pandemics? The next few decades of human development will depend on big data, AI, genetic editing, quantum computing, space travel and other fields that are, in essence, entirely dependent on mathematics. Quantum particles are too small, space too far, data too plentiful and AI too unpredictable to experiment on these things in traditional ways. Scientists in these fields typically no longer rely on experimental data to tell them what is true or not, instead, they rely on the language of mathematics' ability to describe the world. But is this trust justified? What are the differences between science and mathematics? And where does God fit in? Saturday 12th November, at 3pm in the St John’s Centre at St John’s in the City On Sunday after the morning service the talk in the St John’s Centre is: ‘Mathematics, Creativity and the Creator’All mathematics is created by people, and imagination is still the main tool for mathematical progress. However, just like with inspiring art, sometimes it seems to go beyond something created, beyond the imagination of the human creator, to suggest there was something fantastic and real waiting to be discovered the entire time. Join me as I reveal the secret life of the mathematician, and how my quest through the realm of mathematics has led me closer to the ultimate Creator.   OTHER THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT... THE MESSENGER The most recent St John’s Messenger newsletter reviews some recent events, and looks ahead to what is next. <a href="https://www.stjohnsinthecity.org.nz/news/october-messenger" class="sqs-block-button-element--medium sqs-button-element--primary sqs-block-button-element" > The Messenger Newsletter   RAISING THE STANDARD OF GIVING Last week, we highlighted the slides from the AGM about the church finances. <a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/s9vqtz7wnuqaegp/AGM%20Finances%2030th%20October%202022%20slides.pdf?dl=0" class="sqs-block-button-element--medium sqs-button-element--primary sqs-block-button-element" > Slides from the AGM These show that we are continuing to navigate a difficult financial environment with multiple pressures. Even though St John’s achieved an “accounting surplus” for 2021/22, a large deficit of $400,000 is budgeted for 2022/23. This arises because of:• The need to inflation protect the Trust Fund – high inflation and low returns means very limited real returns are expected this year• Insurance costs are $176,000 (plus GST) for the year – a $20,000 increase on last year and a 50% increase over the last 3 years• Repairs and maintenance – painting the manse, washing the buildings on the St John’s site, and the repair of the Church reception roof have added to costs this year• Higher salaries arising from market demand and the intention to fill the youth and children’s ministry vacancies• A significant decline in annual congregational giving of about $60,000 compared with 2018.Some of these challenges, such as insurance, will require a regional or national approach, as other Churches are facing similar cost challenges. And some of these challenges are ours. Giving should be a joy that reflects our faith and enables our worship, ministry, mission and outreach. Jesus talked about money a lot. At least a third of his teaching was about money and property related matters – the incidents of the rich young ruler and the widow’s mite are forthright in their implications. Jesus did this because he knew that many of those he spoke to considered money more important than the Kingdom of God. Let’s prayerfully re-examine our giving as an important expression of our faith and rise to the challenge of an additional $20,000 a year over the next three years. <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " >   ONE CONFERENCE We are excited to have over 240 participants registered for the One Conference here at St John's in the City November 17-19. <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > You have the opportunity to attend any of the four main sessions of the conference for just $5 per session. For information on the main sessions go to: https://www.oneconference.org.nz/keynote-speakersYou do not need to preregister to attend, simply come with $5 cash before the session and pay it at the hospitality desk in the St Johns Centre.   WHĀNAU NIGHT 5pm-6.30pm, Sunday 20 November, BYO Picnic. The theme for the evening will be a youth-led Code Breaker night.We started off the year with a picnic in the park, and we are going to finish off with a picnic in the hall. We invite you to bring your own meal to our final celebration.This will be our LAST whānau night of 2022. And in order to continue whānau nights in 2023, we are looking for a committed leader to help orchestrate and organise teams, as Gordon Fitch is stepping down from this role. Please get in touch if you can to help organise whānau nights. <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " >   DCM Foodbank Appeal …Saturday 19th of November. St John's have been asked to collect from 9am -1pm at Chaffers St New World, with two collectors per hour. You might consider doing this for the sake of those in our city who need help. Please contact Carolyn Goudswaard, if you are able to help. Annual General Meeting …Monday 28th November. Their AGM is in the St John’s Centre. Refreshments will be served from 5:30pm with a meeting start time of 6pm. DCM’s Manahautū, Stephen Turnock, will offer a reflection.   SCOTS COLLEGE ADVENT SERVICE At St John’s in the City 4pm Sunday 27th November 2022.   COMBINED ADVENT SERVICE With St Mary of the Angels and St Peter’s.At St Mary of the Angels 7pm Sunday 27th November 2022 <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " >   FELLOWSHIP GROUP The Fellowship Group meets for the traditional Advent Service on Tuesday 29th November at 11am in the St John’s Church. Please note this is the fifth Tuesday of the month.The usual shared lunch will be enhanced by strawberries and ice-cream. And a koha will be invited in support of the work of Christian World Service.   The grace and peace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you.Allister
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      • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


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