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    • Round 4 scoring updates – Saturday 11 July
      • 11 Jul 2020
      • Wellington Club Weekly
      • It’s round four of the Premier Swindale Shield, Premier Reserve Harper Lock Shield and Premier Women’s competitions, and the third week of Colts and U85kg  competition matches. See below for some updates as the day unfolds. Full review on this website on Saturday night, with plenty of video and photo content to come on our...
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    • Hundy Club Profile: Tomasi Palu
      • 8 Jul 2020
      • Old Boys - University Rugby Club
      • #image_1200984324 { width: 100%; } #image_2101861458 { width: 100%; } #image_837846994 { width: 100%; } #image_1484466077 { width: 100%; } Tell us about where you came from to join OBU? I left straight from Wellington College to OBU. My good mate Seminar Manu (also a Hundy Club member, a profile on him coming up soon hopefully), convinced me to come across to OBU. I was supposed to be going to Poneke with my brother Dave but my brother eventually came over to OBU and played a season or two around 2008-09. What’s your favourite on-field memory? My personal favourite on-field memory had to be when I scored 4 tries against HOBM. I had a career-ending injury that forced retirement later that season. Another great team on-field memory is definitely the Jubilee Cup wins!! The 2017 OBU team was the best club team I’ve ever played in. Another great memory was the 2015 Jubilee Cup win – this win was really important to me personally and emotionally because of the death of our OBU manager and my good mate Richard ‘Puds’ Newsome the year before. He always kept in touch with me and one of the things he said was you will come back to OBU from Norths and win a Jubilee Cup. To fulfil that vision, was one of the main reasons I came back to OBU and I’m stoked we managed to achieve that, not only to make history that year but also knowing he would have been having a few wets that night watching over us and celebrating. Who was your best coach? I have been coached by some great coaches over the years but the best has been Jamie Williams, our current premier coach. He definitely had a huge impact on my form and to still keep me performing at a high level. He definitely knows the game inside and out and this shows in the results he has achieved with the club since he came into OBU. Who were some of those other coaches? Jake White coached the Tongan team on our 2016 tour to Europe. He was a great coach and was great at keeping the boys engaged by making the video analysis sessions short and using as much Tongan language as he could to keep the players engaged. Jamie Joseph coached me with the Wellington Lions 2008. Chris Boyd with the Wellington Lions & also coached me for Tonga in the 2011 World Cup, when we beat France at the Stadium in Wellington. We knew the crowd would be on our side and they were in full red Tongan attire! Definitely a career highlight for me playing in front of a home crowd (along with family and friends) at the cake tin, while representing my country of origin. I was also coached by John Plumtree at the Wellington Academy during my first year out of college. What’s your favourite off-field memory? The court sessions stand out with some fun times. Also the Jubilee cup after-parties, as well as some mighty nights at the Cambridge including the annual Mr OBU pageant. Are you involved in rugby these days?. I retired from playing in the middle of the 2018 season, upon medical advice of a prolapsed disc in my neck which caused me to end my rugby career abruptly.  I started coaching the Queen Margaret’s College 7’s team. The following year we made the national secondary schools 7’s tournament that was hosted in Auckland at King’s college. This was a big achievement for the first ever 7’s team in QMC to qualify for nationals, also a blessing as it was the start of my coaching career. Currently I’m now Director of Rugby for OBU. This includes being the Academy Director of the OBU Academy for male and female university students who play for our club. I helped coach the Premier Men’s team last year and I’ve also completed my World Rugby Level 1 and 2 for Coaching and am working on my Level 3 this year. I also volunteer as an assistant coach for the Colts Black team with Norman Ferguson this year, which is fun and keeps me developing my skills as a coach. Also learning the challenges that all coach’s face, and the many hats they have to wear but I enjoy it with a passion! Any messages of inspiration you want to pass back to the Goat community? Join in and get amongst the Goat herd, and enjoy your playing time!! Once you’ve finished, stay connected, stay involved, because without people we have no community and no club. The next generation of Goat players are always needing Goat mentors and support #OneHerd! You won’t regret it!   Thanks Tomasi! You can check Tomasi’s Hundy club profile over here… The post Hundy Club Profile: Tomasi Palu appeared first on OBU Rugby.
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    • Rugby shines on opening day – rolling updates
      • 20 Jun 2020
      • Wellington Club Weekly
      • Draws & Teamlists HERE  Rugby shines brightly on the the darkest weekend of the year, as the opening weekend of club rugby and college competitions is upon us. See below for some updates as the day unfolds. Full review on this website on Saturday night, with plenty of video and photo content to come on our...
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    • Weekly Wrap Up (Week 10, Term 2)
      • 19 Jun 2020
      • Wellington High School
      • Important Dates Monday 29 June: Open Evening Wednesday 1 July: Music Evening please note change of date Friday 3 July: End of Term 2 Monday 20 July: Start of Term 3 Wednesday 22 July: Parents Evening (Senior Students) Monday 27 July: Parents Evening (Junior Students) Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern visits WHS Last Friday, as part of the Creatives in Schools initiative, which is enabling our He Kākano students to work with the Royal New Zealand Ballet, our Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern visited WHS. This visit presented the opportunity for the Prime Minister to announce an additional $4 million for the project which will ultimately enable students from 500 NZ schools to work with professonal artists and creative practitioners, benefiting from their specialist artistic knowledge and creative practices. Thirteen of our He Kākano students are involved in the programme which is aimed at enhancing student wellbeing and improving their ‘core competencies in communication, collaboration and creative thinking’, as well as inspiring awareness of careers in the arts and creative sectors. As part of the visit He Kākano shared what they had learned prior to lockdown, demonstrating fantastic memory of their routines and great coordination too. The Prime Minister also met students passionate about the creative arts, taking time to talk to them about their interests and talents.               Important information Breakfast club We are pleased to announce that we are opening up a Breakfast Club at the school from the start of Term 3.  This will run in the canteen each day and will be free to any student who wishes to start the a nutritious bowl of Weetbix. Resources for your mental health Melon Manual is a kete of resources specifically for teenagers’ emotional wellbeing. Supported by the Ministry of Health, the website provides videos and worksheets and advice to support the young people of Aotearoa. You can access the resources here Dyslexia – How you can help WHS Community Education Centre has a 2.5 hour talk with  expert Mike Styles, on Dyslexia – How You Can Help. This is an interactive and participatory session to assist parents and loved ones understand and support a family member or friend who has dyslexia or a similar learning difference. Wednesday 24 June – 5.30pm-8pm $20  Call 04 385 8919 to enrol or go here: https://www.cecwellington.ac.nz/w/courses/1506-dyslexia-how-you-can-help Now that we are at alert Level 1, CEC courses are back up and running with a wide variety of courses on offer. To find out more, and enrol, click on the image below of visit cecwellington.ac.nz. What’s happening? He Kākano hard at work This week the He Kākano students have been busy in science, art, fashion and design classes.                     Achievements DocEdge documentary success Contratulations to Year 10 Sky Gobbi who has secured 3rd place in the DocEdge Student Short Documentary Competition last week. Now that it has had its premiere, Sky’s documentary can be shared. To view, click on the image below or visit https://youtu.be/jVdvCoy9TSY.
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      • Wellington High School, Taranaki Street, Mount Cook, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • What you love most about living in Ngaio or Crofton Downs
      • 30 Apr 2020
      • Ngaio Progressive Association
      • Even in these uncertain times, there’s one thing we know for sure – staying home for 4 weeks has given us chance to spend more time than we ever thought possible in Wellington’s best little suburb – Ngaio Crofton Downs! So it’s just the time – we thought – to ask you what things you most LOVE about living here? Is it the people? the bush? the wildlife? the hills? the clean air? or something else…? And while we’ve been staying home, what have you enjoyed most? Walking down the middle of your street without fear of being bowled over by the traffic? the peace and quiet? The call of the Tui and the Kereru? talking with your neighbours over the fence? or something else…? Upload a video, a photo, a message or an audio and tell us what you love most about living in Ngaio or Crofton Downs. And what’s been best about staying-home here – things you want to keep hold of, even when Covid-19 is beaten! Keeping down our carbon footprint and keeping up our healthier lifestyles and communities maybe…? How to get your entry to us? – send them from online at this link– or email info@ngaio.org.nz, or post to a cloud sharing facility and send us a link. DEADLINE – 5.00pm 22 May
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    • The City Gallery Pub Quiz
      • 26 Apr 2020
      • City Gallery
      • Which New Zealand artist painted herself as a smoking modern woman in 1937? Who had joined her on a painting trip to remote Cass the previous year? In 1941, who wrote the manifesto ‘Individual Happiness Now’ with British writer Robert Graves? In 1947, who wrote ‘New Zealand’s Oldest Art Galleries’ and what were they? What is New Zealand’s oldest (conventional) public art gallery? In 1948, who said McCahon’s work ‘might pass as graffiti on the walls of some celestial lavatory’?  When did McCahon move to Auckland to work at Auckland City Art Gallery? Who was Director of the Gallery back then? When did Bill Culbert leave New Zealand? Who was born Barrie Bates? When did he go blond? When did Peter McLeavey open his Wellington gallery? Who curated New Zealand Māori Culture and the Contemporary Scene in 1966? Who said: ‘My work is an investigation of positive/negative relationships within a deliberately limited range of forms.’ Where and when did he first show his koru paintings? Who was Otago University’s first Hodgkins Fellow? When was Gordon Brown and Hamish Keith’s book New Zealand Painting: An Introduction first published? Of whose work was it said: ‘When you offer only three vertical lines precisely drawn and set into a dark pool of lacquer it is a visual kind of starvation’. Who wrote that? What was the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery’s opening show? Who was its Director? When was Ngā Puna Waihanga formed? What was it? When was the first issue of Art New Zealand published? Whose work was on the cover? Who painted Drinking Couple: Fraser Analysing My Words? And who was Fraser? Where did Jeffrey Harris go to art school? When did Richard Killeen make his first cutout? Who was crucified in Christchurch the same year? When did Wellington City Art Gallery open and who was the Director? What was his last job? What was ANZART? Has Marina Abramovic ever performed publicly in New Zealand? When did Wellington’s Women’s Gallery open? That year, to where did Robin White and her family relocate? What’s White’s religion? And what’s her tribal affiliation? Auckland art dealer Gary Langsford played guitar in which famous New Zealand band? When and where did Te Māori open? At Art in Dunedin in 1984, who made music using his own dripping urine? Who made Gates of the Goddess: A Southern Crossing Attended by the Goddess and when? What was it made of? Cass Altarpiece has been described as ‘expressionism with nothing to express’. Who painted it? What Christchurch artist based much of her work on alchemy and kabbalism? Who depicted herself as a rat and a tiger? When did Auckland’s Artspace open? How many buildings has it occupied?  What New Zealand artist featured in the show Magiciennes de la Terre in Paris in 1989. What do Marlene Cubewell and Merit Groting have in common? Which Lyttelton artist had a game-changing experience in the subantarctic? What did The Active Eye, Views/Exposures, and Imposing Narratives have in common? In Views/Exposures, who presented five identical images of his own naked torso? Who dressed-up her Uncle Hugh (then suffering from dementia) to restage a series of iconic historical photos?  Which artist died at Waitangi aged 50, the day after the 1990 Waitangi Day celebrations? Who did his pe’a? Who photographed him getting it? With him, which two other expressionist painters comprised the Militant Artists Union? How old were both Clairmont and Giovanni Intra when they died? In 1992, who based the design of his exhibition catalogue cover after the one for the Nazis’ 1937 Degenerate Art show? In 1994, Hamilton city councillor Russ Rimmington was reported in the media saying: ‘I’ve got a mind as broad as a Roman sewer, but this is just sleaze.’ What was he describing? In 1997 who ‘stole’ McCahon’s Urewera Triptych and why? How did they hide it? Where did they steal it from? Who designed that building? What photobook was described as ‘a charismatic exposé of the hideous truths and self-conscious mythologies of unemployed psychopaths who frequent Verona cafe and actually believe in drag’. Who said it? When did New Zealand start going to the Venice Biennale? Who did we send? What was the Bart Wells Institute? Yvonne Todd won the inaugural Walters Prize in 2002. Who was the judge and what the name of her winning photographic series? What did Pakuranga’s Fisher Gallery and Titirangi’s Lopdell House become? Who was in the hot seat longest: Paula Savage as Director of City Gallery Wellington or Chris Saines as Director of Auckland Art Gallery?  When did Bill Culbert represent New Zealand in the Venice Biennale? In recent years, Christchurch Art Gallery acquired five ‘significant’ works by Martin Creed, Antony Gormley, Ron Mueck, Michael Parekōwhai, and Bridget Riley. Why five? Who won the Walters Prize in 2016 for a video where he talked to animals? Who has been the Herald’s art critic for over fifty years and is known for wearing a cape? What group protested Luke Willis Thompson’s inclusion in the 2018 Turner Prize? Answers here.
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      • Wellington City Gallery, Civic Square, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Sporting students staying motivated during Lockdown (Part 3)
      • 13 Apr 2020
      • College Sport Wellington
      • What does the lockdown mean for sporting students? How has it affected them and what are they doing to stay fit and motivated? Two more local sports students are Toby Cook (Wellington College), who spent the summer preparing to travel with his school’s rugby party to Argentina and Jacob Madigan (St Patrick’s College, Kilbirnie) who was winding up his summer sport and about to start his winter code. We asked them what they are doing during lockdown: Jacob Madigan in action for St Patricks Kilbirnie (Photo by Hamish Wareham) College Sport Wellington: Please tell us what you were preparing for before the Lockdown? Toby: As I was a part of the Wellington College touring rugby squad to Argentina, 30 of us boys had been training pretty hard from the end of last year. Although three weeks before the lockdown started we were informed the trip had been cancelled, we then shifted our focus to training for the regular season which is also currently at a standstill. Jacob: I was involved with the St Pats First XI cricket team and we were nearing the end of the season with only one game left plus a T20 tournament during summer tournament week. On that same weekend we had our first preseason First XI football games up in Palmerston North, which got cancelled CSW: what you are doing to keep fit and train? Toby: Our coaches and trainers from school have been great in sending out information so you can train no matter what equipment you have. My sister was also able to bring home an erg which is a welcome change from running. As well as trying to get a session in each day I’m also trying to keep up my basic skills. Jacob: Our football coach gave us a programme to do over the lockdown period which means hopefully we can be fit going into the season. I have also been doing some technical work for football and cricket in my back garden and at the park. CSW: Please share a lockdown sports practice or training tip for your school mates and others out there in the same situation? Toby: I normally try to complete my training in the morning as I find it gets it out of the way and sets you up for the rest of the day. Another thing I’ve found helpful is our trainer turned our sessions into a competition and we have to record and send in our training and time which keeps us accountable. Jacob: Keep doing something relating to your sport. It is hard in these times to keep motivated when you can’t actually go and train and play but if you keep doing fitness or technical work, then you will be good to go when the season comes. Also track your times of what you are doing and compare them to a friend and see who can do better as a bit of motivation. CSW: Are you in contact with your sporting friends about the above and are you motivating each other remotely? Toby: As above, the majority of the squad have been videoing and sending through their workouts to our chat. This has been great as it allows us to see what everyone else is doing to motivate each other, the videos also keep us accountable for the work we are doing. Jacob: Yes, I’ve been talking to the boys about how they are going and a few of them send me daily photos of them doing the exercises. I have also been talking to friends outside of school who are doing their own fitness work just to see what they are doing and how they are going. -Story courtesy of College Sport Media The post Sporting students staying motivated during Lockdown (Part 3) appeared first on College Sport Wellington.
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    • Long Read: Mass Rapid Transit in Wellington
      • 26 Jun 2019
      • Fair Intelligent Transport (FIT) Wellington
      • Posted by Kerry Wood <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > The latest version of ‘trackless tram’ (TT) has been developed by CRRC in China. A trial system has been running in Zhuzhou since 2017, and should be coming onto the market about now. It is of interest in Wellington because of potential cost-savings over light rail, but comes with corresponding problems and is barely commercial at this stage. TT is distinct from BRT but shares some important characteristics. On this page… Key messsages Route and capacity Light Rail BRT Trackless Trams Costs Key messsages The TT feature of interest in Wellington is capacity. It is the highest-capacity BRT-like vehicle on the market, presumably with a much better ride than a bus, and may be able to meet Wellington needs on a two-lane route. Any decision to adopt TT will require careful studies; Wellington has already run into costly problems created by a casual attitude to supposedly minor issues. In a more difficult situation, we must get it right this time: BRT using conventional articulated buses is well-established but an unlikely option for Wellington. High-capacity BRT is generally used in cities having wide streets, unlike Wellington. TT might be an alternative to BRT, if it can offer sufficient capacity, and when ‘the kinks have been ironed out.’ At a time of very rapid change, uncertainties are inevitable and require good management. In this case high-capacity would be a low-risk approach, favouring either light rail or four-lane BRT. Decision-makers need to bear two things in mind: First, light rail becomes cheaper than either BRT or buses at a relatively low ridership. Second, BRT also benefits from a properly segregated route, to minimise congestion, and from diverted underground services to minimise delays. Light rail may well be the lowest-risk option, or even the cheapest option. An independent conclusion comes from Matt L at the Greater Auckland transport blog: I do think that this [TT] technology is promising and definitely worth keeping an eye on, but I’m not convinced that Auckland should be so quick to jump on the bandwagon. Let’s at least wait till at least a handful of cities have successfully rolled this out and ironed out all the kinks… Let’s also wait till there are multiple suppliers with inter-operable systems. Unfortunately, even without the capacity/frequency issues that I think would be an issue for the city centre, I don’t think Auckland can afford to wait. We need to get on fixing transport in this city and so should get on with installing light rail as soon as possible. ↑ Contents Route and capacity The LGWM route has recently been challenged, with proposals for a Mt Victoria tunnel for buses, walkers and cyclists. A tunnel for walkers and cyclists seems sensible, but a new bus tunnel would be a backward step. The existing Bus Tunnel is adequate for serving Hataitai, and a much better MRT route is through Newtown, because of high residential density. Densities are too low for MRT in Hataitai and through to Miramar and the Airport. The Newtown route offers substantially greater residential density, on both sides of the route, as well as potential for future density. Adelaide Rd and Kilbirnie are designated WCC development areas. A Mt Victoria route was proposed in the 2013 Spine Study, apparently to save time, but the real time-savings come from good detail design on the chosen route. Bypassing Wellington Hospital is itself a planning error for MRT: BRT in Brisbane went as far as a stop within the Hospital building. It is not a criticism to recognise that LGWM’s modal demand estimates for 2036 contain serious errors. Ideas and assumptions in transport are changing very quickly, among professionals and through society as a whole. Engineering NZ’s latest Transport Group Conference had the theme ‘Change is in the air.’ Who could have imagined, twelve months ago, that school children would be going on strike to demand action on climate change? Will we really see a third of CBD commuters still travelling by car in 2036, as predicted by LGWM? We don’t know. With so many uncertainties to manage, LGWM might be wise to plan for generous spare capacity on primary public transport routes: rail into Wellington and MRT further south. This might even extend to purchasing delivery options, or more vehicles than needed. If world-wide demand shoots up, small orders for a city like Wellington might take too long. The combination of highly uncertain demand and high-capacity MRT suggests that mass-transit might usefully be over-provided, within reason. Under-providing seems likely to be the greater risk. ↑ Contents Light Rail At this stage, light rail seems to be the only option clearly suited to Wellington and the chosen route. It is also available from multiple suppliers; light rail is well-established and supply-competitive. BRT is also available from multiple suppliers, but TT is only available from CRRC. The example vehicle chosen by FIT is seven-section, similar to the Gold Coast (G-link) vehicle in the photo. It is 63 m long with a capacity of nominally 470 passengers. Shorter vehicles might be best for the early years, reducing costs, but longer vehicles might be cheaper in the long term. The costly parts of a modern tram are the control system and cabs, and operating cost-differences are almost independent of vehicle length. If lack of capacity is a risk, then longer vehicles could usefully be introduced at once. The obvious drawback of light rail is the cost of track and diverting underground services. The usual arrangement is that services running along the light rail route are relocated beside it, and services crossing it are relaid in ducts, so that they can be replaced without disturbing light rail. Large drains are generally an exception because they can be repaired from the inside. ↑ Contents BRT A new route study can be based on the ITDP BRT Standard. In 2017 LGWM’s consultant WSP recommended design to the ITDP ‘Bronze Standard,’ and gave these assumptions: Full separation from general traffic flows (dedicated lanes), except intersections. High priority at traffic signals. Requires integration with surrounding walking, cycling & traffic network. Fully electric vehicles. High frequency 2.0–2.5 min/direction/peak hour (“realistic/normal” operating frequency of BRT on Golden Mile). Less transfers/interchanges for passengers. Maximum Capacity 150+ passengers. Medium potential to attract car users to PT. Modern low floor articulated bus vehicles. Flexible/less physical infrastructure. Generally fixed route, some flexibility (if required). BRT is likely to cost roughly the same as conventional buses. In practice, BRT seems very unlikely to be satisfactory in Wellington, because lack of space in the CBD will require a two-lane route. This might be sufficient with good management, of bus lanes, but can never be enough at stations. BRT stations in Brisbane (scaled from an aerial photograph) are typically about 27 m wide, compared with a street-width of 15.1 m in Wellington’s Manners St, for all purposes. BRT stations need two lanes each way, for buses overtaking buses. Also needed are more bus-berths, dedicated berths for each route (so that passengers know where to wait), and substantial platform width to handle passenger numbers. Some principal CBD junctions may need flyovers, to allow adequate junction time for traffic crossing the busway. WSP (bullet point 5 above) anticipate a reliable maximum time between buses of two or two and a half minutes between buses on the golden mile, only 24–30 bus/hr. The only real alternatives to the golden mile are two lanes on the waterfront or two lanes on the ‘secondary spine’ proposed in the Spine Study, using Featherston and Wakefield Streets southbound, and returning on Jervois Quay. Neither is wide enough, with very poor passenger access and legibility. ↑ Contents Trackless Trams Chinese developer CRRC is now the world’s largest manufacturer of railway rolling-stock (Newman et al. (2019), p 33, The Trackless Tram: is it the transit and city shaping catalyst we have been waiting for?). CRRC’s Autonomous Rail Rapid Transit (‘trackless tram’ or TT) system is now being trialled in Zhuzhou. TT might prove an attractive option, but there are surprising uncertainties here. Detailed information from CRRC is still scarce, and some sources seem very unreliable. Much of what is available is dated 2017, and an apparently official video is remarkably amateur. It is not even clear that CRRC have yet begun to market TT. TT uses digital steering of all six axles to track a pair of painted lines, with supplementary data from GPS and LIDAR. CRRC have paid close attention to ride quality, using high-speed rail technology. The vehicles are battery-powered (in fact condensers), with an anticipated range of 50 km after a ten-minute charge, backed up by an overnight ‘deep recharge’ and a brief top-up at each station (Newman et al. (2019), p 38). CRRC is offering, or planning to offer, vehicles 30 metres long, in three sections, with a five-section option planned. See the photos below. CRRC now has the largest vehicles on offer, with probably the best ride and the most effective batteries and charging systems. Other manufacturers are also in the market, including Alstom, Van Hool and Irizar (Newman et al. (2019), p 34), offering shorter, bus-based vehicles. The route capacity achievable using light rail is about 10,000 passengers an hour in Wellington, which seems a reasonable target for TT. A lower target would be more easily achieved but might risk running into capacity problems. Three-section TT vehicles are 31.6 m long and 2.65 m wide (the standard light rail width). The claimed capacity is 250–300, which seems very high. A standard figure in Europe is a preferred maximum of 4 standing passengers per square metre. Using this figure, and comparing on a floor-area basis (after subtracting two metres at each end, for the drivers’ cabs), gives a TT vehicle capacity of about 220 passengers. A further correction is needed, because TT vehicles have wide wheel-boxes for six axles (like the front wheels of a bus), and the boxing is continued beneath side-facing seats: the seats are set forward from the windows (photo above right). The full vehicle width is only available to passengers around the doors. An estimated width-correction of 300 mm reduces the capacity to 200 passengers, or 330 on a five-section TT, about 50 m long. This is about 70% of the assumed light rail capacity of 470 (FIT example vehicle). An animated video suggests that two TT vehicles can run in convoy only about a metre apart. If such an option becomes practical, TTs might be capable of running together without coupling, matching light rail capacity and eliminating the need for a four lane route. However, stop-length is another consideration. Finding space for platforms longer than about 50 m becomes progressively more difficult, and extremely difficult beyond about 70 m. Two potential TT risks are: A typical modern European tram (Siemens Avenio, 63 m long) weighs nearly three times as much as a full load of passengers, but TT vehicles weigh only about 15% more. The risk here is that long vehicles need adequate ‘buffing strength’ to protect passengers in the event of a crash. The whole vehicle needs to be strong enough to absorb the kinetic energy of the rear end with minimum risk to passengers. TT in New Zealand will need careful checking for compliance with regulations, regardless of whether the system is treated as bus or light rail. In either case, new regulations will be needed, and may need legislation. Wellington would gain a dual advantage from choosing ‘the same as Auckland’: no regulatory costs, and cheaper vehicles and equipment because of repeat orders. In Looking past the hype about trackless trams, Wong (2018) points out that TT is not really revolutionary, and alternatives to light rail have been available for years. However, Wong also challenges TT’s ride quality, which might be unfair, but his paper is still of interest. A guide and manual with application to Trackless Trams, a paper by Peter Newman et al. (2018), develops a new method of assessing public transport, specifically with TT in mind: Traditional transit planning does the transport engineering first and then adds the land use planning as a supplement after finding government funding; the approach being presented here starts with the land development planning and then does the transport engineering after achieving the funding/ financing from the land development potential. [p 6] Four approaches to capital are used: broadly, all-public; mostly public; mostly private; and all-private. While the paper seems very useful (and note the BCR below), explicitly applying it to TT seems doubtful: By integrating higher value into land development within cities, rather than having further land development on the urban fringe, there are significant public and private benefits that vastly outweigh the costs. Some BCR calculations have seen a simple light rail project with a BCR of 1.5 increase to around 7 because of the increased land development. This not only saves public money in infrastructure costs (usually 1.5 times as much as redevelopment) but also provides transport time savings for those living in the [Transit-Oriented Development areas (such as WCC’s plans for Adelaide Rd)] (based on all transport usage). Thus, it is important to ensure land value increases are integrated into the full transit and land system upgrade process. [p 6] Clearly, the model also works with light rail, but perhaps more worrying is this: Towards the end we show that a Trackless Tram is likely to be the new ‘rail’ system for cities as it does all the things light rail does but costs one tenth of it. This low cost makes it possible for entrepreneurial developers to build such systems as it will unlock their developments. [p 14] TT at a tenth of the cost of light rail is implausible. While the four-level model is interesting, other sources suggest that saving 90% of light rail costs is unrealistic. One of Newman’s errors has been picked up by Matt L: The press for the trackless train claims the vehicle can hold 300 people. This seems highly unlikely given the vehicle is only about 30m long. As a comparison, AT say that a 66m light rail vehicle will hold up to 420 people. The interior of the vehicle doesn’t suggest a huge amount of standing space either and a capacity of 180–200 people seems more realistic. But even if it could hold 300 people, it’s not enough, which is why AT are going for higher capacity vehicles. Newman himself notes (Newman et al. (2019), p 39) an Australian estimate of a third of the cost of light rail, which seems a reasonable starting-point; real-world costs must cover more than painting double white lines. Trackless trams, like BRT, look tempting because they seem far more cost-effective than light rail. This has gone on for a long time, and Wong (2018) refers to a 1994 paper, by Henscher and Walters, titled Light rail and bus priority systems: Choice or blind commitment? Perhaps the largest single risk when adopting alternatives to light rail is the simplest. Decision-makers have repeatedly demonstrated how easily they can convince themselves that anything without tracks must be better than light rail. An example is that UCL, in Innovative technologies for light rail and tram: a European reference resource Briefing paper 1 Tyre innovation–rubber tyred trams (a 2015 review of earlier versions of trackless trams), commented: All (BRT) systems installed to date have been more expensive than conventional tramways. At least two of those systems were replaced by light rail. A related blind-commitment temptation is assuming that only light rail needs to disturb underground services. The ignored risk is that underground services can disrupt TT, just as they have always disrupted present-day motor traffic: TT/BRT proponents, including CRRC, claim the benefits of being able to avoid a crash by manually steering around the obstruction. This is as much a disadvantage as an advantage, because the converse is motor vehicles running on TT/BRT ‘tracks.’ Light rail experience in Britain is stoppages when parked cars obstruct the track, and TT/BRT must also address these risks. The light rail photo on page 3 shows a kerb outside the tracks (at right), with prominent ‘TRAM ONLY’ signs painted on the road, to discourage motor vehicles. Light rail has to maintain an exclusive corridor, and effective TT will need to do the same. If TT/BRT is seen as not needing underground services diversion, decision-makers have unwittingly accepted the risk of delays or damage when underground services fail. Motor traffic is frequently delayed in this way, and drivers manage it by travelling at other times or taking an alternative route. Road signs warning of future disruptions are commonplace. Neither management option is available to either TT or BRT, and Wellington has recent experience of the effects. When the Hutt railway line was washed out in 2013, motor traffic also came to a standstill, for several days. Ignoring the need for services diversion for TT/BRT will tend to have the same effect, rarely over days, but even ten minutes can be very disruptive. Wellington decision-makers need to face facts here. Two major studies, the 2011 Bus Review and the 2013 Spine Study, were wiped out by ill-considered cost-savings. Ten years after the problem was first identified, Greater Wellington still has a heavily overloaded bus route and no plans for improvement. This process, of unconsciously working towards a substandard outcome, is well-known; blind commitment is one term, but Wikipedia calls it BRT Creep: BRT creep comprises several types of gradual erosions in service that sometimes affect a bus rapid transit (BRT) system, resulting in a service that is not up to the standards promised by BRT advocates. In its ideal form, BRT aims to combine the capacity and speed of a light rail system with the flexibility, cost and simplicity of a bus system. BRT creep occurs when a system that promises these features instead acts more like a standard, non-rapid bus system… The most extreme versions of BRT creep lead to systems that cannot even truly be recognised as “Bus Rapid Transit”. This is what happens when the bus lobby sidles in and whispers, “we can do exactly the same for half the price.” They do, and they can’t. ↑ Contents Costs Costs for TT vehicles are roughly comparable with light rail; say about $80 million to run a five-minute service. Other cost estimates vary wildly, but real-world costs must cover more than painting double white lines: Road re-grading as needed; TT videos show well-levelled surfaces everywhere. TT vehicles use the same low floor-level as light rail, and will tend to need similar large-radius vertical curves. Heavy-current, high-voltage power at all stops, termini, and especially the depot. Stations, including platforms, shelter, passenger access; ticketing machines and connections at hubs. A depot, with scope for expansion. Motor traffic realignment to make room for TT. Integration with traffic signals for TT priority. Any TT cost-estimates for Wellington will need great care, using data from existing users. Ensuring a dedicated and separated corridor would future-proof TT to support fully autonomous operation when the technology matures: light rail is future-proofed by design. The first light rail line in Montpellier opened in 2001, and in 2008 was carrying 30 million passengers a year. A cost analysis from Marc le Tourneur (2011), Making the case for trams and regional trams, showed that buses and BRT both cost about 45% more than light rail: light rail (actual figures) Investment cost per passenger€ 0.93 Operating cost per passenger€ 0.53 Total€ 1.46 buses (actual figures) Investment cost per passenger€ 0.49 Operating cost per passenger€ 1.61 Total€ 2.12 bus rapid transit (simulated using data from Nantes) Investment cost per passenger€ 0.84 Operating cost per passenger€ 1.27 Total€ 2.11 Montpellier (populaton 290,000) now has four light rail lines, with a total length of 60 km. Data from Transport for London gives equal costs for buses and light rail at about 3200 light rail passengers an hour; a little higher and light rail is cheaper than buses, and a lot cheaper when light rail is running at capacity. One reason is that savings on operations cost are sufficient to pay for greater capital costs. Roughly 70% of operating costs are driver’s wages, for either buses or light rail, but one light rail driver replaces some four to six bus drivers. ↑ Contents
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    • January update from DCM - together we can end homelessness
      • 30 Jan 2019
      • Downtown Community Ministry
      • 96 January update from DCM - together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } What a gift! DCM's 24th Bookfair in DCM's 50th birthday year DCM's 50th birthday year has got off to a great start with the wonderful news that we will be able to hold another fundraising Bookfair. What a gift to DCM, our taumai and the many, many Wellingtonians who turn up at the Bookfair every year. Mark your diaries for Saturday 17 August 2019. What can you do to help? Write the date in your diary Share the poster with your friends and networks - we need to get thousands of book lovers through the doors this year We welcome your book donations, here at DCM, week days; we haven't been able to accept book donations for the last 6 months, so we encourage everybody to let their networks know that we are accepting books now so we can offer another high quality Bookfair in 2019 BUT MOST OF ALL! We are urgently seeking volunteer drivers to help transport books - please get in touch by emailing office@dcm.org.nz or phone (04) 384 7699 <!-- --> Supporters of the Month Each week during our 50th birthday year we are acknowledging one of our many kaitautoko (supporters), because together we can end homelessness in Wellington. In January, we have lifted up: Our DCM Bookfair sorters who eagerly await your book donations Press Hall Food Court who put on an amazing lunch for taumai, bringing their kai to us DCM Chairperson Kevin who has been on our board for 14 years now, supporting our staff and mahi Rick from Temple Sinai who picks up kai from Pandoro so we can offer hospitality to people who have been rough sleeping in the city of Wellington For all our regular updates follow DCM on Facebook and Twitter. Housing First Another exciting development in our 50th birthday year will be the launch of a Wellington Housing First service. We look forward to sharing more about this as the year progresses. To learn more about Housing First, enjoy meeting Tony in this video. Tony was housed from homelessness by DCM in 2018, and the pride he has in his new whare will inspire you. If you know of any qualified social workers who may be interested in joining our Housing First team, please get in touch. <!-- --> What can I do? Give our taumai a gift in our 50th birthday year. DCM's Te Hāpai service is a welcoming space for people who are rough sleeping. We are looking for a coffee filter sponsor ($30 a month), sugar sponsor ($50 a month) and a milk powder sponsor ($120 a month). For more ideas about how you can help visit our website and Support DCM Do you know others who would love to learn more about DCM and our work with people who are experiencing homelessness? Encourage them to join our mailing list for monthly updates during our 50th birthday year. <!-- --> Read More Success Stories <!-- --> Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2019 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
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