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    • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM Stephen’s story - his journey from Christchurch, through the challenges of his youth, to a career supporting the most marginalised communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Ngā mihi nui! We would like to thank everyone who participated in our Ngā Kōrero survey last month. It was so uplifting to hear your feedback. One suggestion was to share a mix of short and longer stories. We will share shorter stories at the beginning of our Ngā Kōrero updates. (But don’t miss our longer story this month, which is all about our Manahautū, Stephen.) You will also find regular updates from DCM on our socials. Follow the links below. DCM’s new digs Aro Mai Housing First in the Hutt For the past few years, DCM has had an Aro Mai Housing First team based at Tākiri Mai Te Ata, in Kōkiri. Our team have been delivering services in support of the most marginalised in the Hutt, such as Michelle, whose story we shared last year. Our team now has their own digs on Market Grove, and we've also welcomed a new kaiārahi (team leader), Larissa. Watch the clip below for a quick tour and kōrero, which concludes with waiata from some of DCM’s Pasifika kaimahi. We look forward to sharing more about our work in the Hutt soon. Stephen’s story For the past three years, Stephen Turnock, of Ngāi Tahu descent, has been DCM’s Manahautū (Director). Stephen is DCM’s first Māori director and brings his own experiences of systemic racism and homelessness with him. Stephen considers it a privilege to work at DCM, where he has taken us on a journey of transformational change, helping us gain clarity around our vision for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued, and thriving while ensuring we have both the infrastructure and team capabilities to bring that vision to life. Here, Stephen shares the taonga that is his story with us – his journey from Christchurch, through the challenges of his youth, to a career supporting the most marginalised. Young Stephen on the ferry from Christchurch to Wellington. “I am Christchurch born and bred,” Stephen shares. “I was adopted out at birth. I always had an aunty – but I didn’t know she was my biological mother until I was about 20. So, I grew up as the middle of two boys in a traditional South Island Pākehā family where rugby was our foundation. My adopted father was a very hard-working man in the Christchurch wool stores. My mother was also hard-working and was our primary source of emotional support and love, but unfortunately, violence was an aspect of our upbringing – with the odd visit to A&E.” But Stephen is quick to add, “I have huge loyalty to my mother and my father – they raised me as parents, and while there are things that I wish could have been different, at the end of the day they fed me, they clothed me, they loved me – they were my parents. “We were never well off, always struggling, but generally, it was an uneventful childhood. Then, probably at the age of eight, we packed up in the caravan and just travelled New Zealand for about two years. They are the most positive and happy memories I have as a child.” Seven-year-old Stephen on the road with his whānau. At primary school, Stephen had his first encounters with racism. “I would’ve been about 10 or 11 when it became apparent that I was a Māori in a Pākehā family,” Stephen says. “Kids would say things like, ‘Why are you brown when your brother’s white?’ I never considered myself different – but outside influences made me more aware of it.” Stephen describes how the racism ramped up when he went to college. “I think there were three Māori in a high school of 1,200,” he says. “I was often called a n– to my face.” With abuse at school, violence at home, and undiagnosed learning difficulties, Stephen came to understand the concept of fight or flight. “I started running away from home and gravitating to people experiencing similar situations. As you’re introduced to alcohol and drugs, it’s a recipe for disaster. It’s the same story we’ve heard for generations and particularly experienced by Maori.” From 13-16 years of age, Stephen was often away from home and rough sleeping – “Doing some pretty serious stuff with some pretty serious people.” One night, Stephen found himself part of a group out late at night, up to no good. “Someone must have rung the Police, and they ended up chasing us. I remember spending the next three hours lying face flat on this little roof in the pouring rain as they searched for us. I did some soul searching during this time, and I decided that was it – this is not the life for me.” Stephen’s decision to change his lifestyle resulted in him losing his entire group of friends but he was fortunate that he was able to return home and started working for his father in the wool stores. “It was hard labour,” Stephen shares. “Wool looks quite fluffy and white – but at first, it’s horrible, full of thorns and grease. Your arms would be all blistered, and you’d stink. Many of the people who worked there were hardcore – alcoholics – all sorts. I started to learn the importance of getting on with others and being aware of the art of negotiation.” Along with work, rugby became an important part of Stephen’s life at this time, empowering him to build a more positive social network. He became the youngest player to make his club Colts team, later moving to Sydney to try to make it big in rugby league. “I was terribly homesick,” Stephen shares. “Being in a big city by yourself is hard, and looking back, I realise the value of whānau and social support systems. Although, I sometimes wish I could have stuck it out because I’m pretty adamant I could have broken my way into the NRL.” Stephen’s rugby days, aged 20. Stephen is reflective about this period of his life. “I guess one of the things I learned was that no matter how you feel or how bad things are, they do get better. Things heal over time – and you learn to move forward. The key is who we surround ourselves with and finding that light to aspire towards.” Stephen moved to Queenstown, where he worked as a hotel porter. “I absolutely loved it. But racism popped up again. One of my jobs as a porter was to write welcome messages and one day, I wrote ‘Kia ora’ and got told off for it. This was in the late 90s/early 2000s – and on reflection, I’m extremely proud of how far we have come since then. But the impact it had on me and my generation was significant – because you’re reminded that you and your culture is not a good thing, and I remember that being very evident at the time.” Stephen took up rugby again, and one day, out of the blue, his coach said, “I work at this place called Kingslea. They are looking for some casual workers, and I think you’d be really good.” Kingslea was a residential home for children aged 7 to 17 with youth justice-related issues. It was a place where Stephen himself had ended up as a young teenager. “My first days at Kingslea remind me how our new staff may feel, standing in DCM’s courtyard, surrounded by heightened emotions, dysfunctional behaviours, and feeling like a fish out of water. After some time and confidence-building, I decided this job was for me. I ended up being there for about eight years.” Stephen worked as a residential social worker and was supported to get his tertiary qualification while on the job. “I guess I had a natural empathy from my lived experiences. I knew the tricks of the trade and learned the importance of teamwork and great communication.” Studies also opened Stephen’s eyes to issues such as systemic institutional racism and the link between colonisation and poor outcomes for Māori. Stephen has been DCM’s Manahautū (Director) for the past three years. Photo by John Tavoi. At about 26 or 27, Stephen started to experience significant depression, which led to some job changes that – each in their own way – enriched his working life. “I was a probation officer at Corrections. I spent two years there, and again, I enjoyed it. I learned a lot about cycles of change, self-talk, how to shift negative thoughts, and how to work in high-risk situations.” A new relationship led to a move to Wellington, where Stephen got a job with Te Roopu Awhina in Cannons Creek. “I had built my awareness of my culture and the impacts of colonisation and low economic outcomes through my studies, but I had not seen the level of deprivation I saw when I arrived in Porirua. On the flip side, I had never experienced the level of cultural diversity, pride and inclusion. I really felt the beauty of Māoridom and also the Pasifika migration to Porirua. It filled my basket of knowledge and understanding of communities and culture.” Another role Stephen had was working for Maritime Radio. “We were the 111 service of the sea. I learned a lot and developed my skills in dealing with stressful situations – remaining calm for the benefit of the other person on the line.” Stephen eventually moved into a management role at Porirua Whānau Centre, overseeing a team of social workers, counsellors, a youth team and a family violence prevention group. In addition, he managed the social housing portfolio, providing sustainable housing for whānau in the Porirua region. “I learned to see the bigger picture and think about strategy – you do this, and it will impact that – it becomes a sort of natural progression.” Stephen brought all his life experiences and skills to DCM, joining the team as Manahautū (Director) in late 2020, taking over from Stephanie McIntyre, who led DCM for 17 years. Soon after joining DCM, Stephen also got married – to Tam – in February 2021, pictured here on their honeymoon in the Bay of Islands. “I was very interested in homelessness and housing – but it’s not until you come to DCM that you get a pretty heavy thud of reality about what homelessness really looks like. Fortunately, we have an amazing team to deliver our services. I’m a big believer that how you treat people has a big say on your success as an organisation. People need to feel valued – like they’re a part of something. If you want the absolute best for your organisation and the best for the people you’re working with, you need to treat your staff like they are the most valuable asset. “I ask, ‘What can I do for you so you can do what you need to do?’ I’ve learnt that this also needs to be accompanied by clarity – a shared understanding or shared motivation around what success looks like to DCM and the whānau we support. “As a leader, I believe strongly in turning up as my best self. I try to do this by role-modelling our values and being my authentic self. Although I will admit that I can get that wrong at times, I’m also willing to be vulnerable and take responsibility for this. I believe an effective organisation starts from a foundation of trust. Trust in me, trust in each other, and trust in the steps we are all taking to reach our vision.” Stephen and Tam with their blended whānau. Looking at his vision for 2024, Stephen wants to see DCM grow our capability as an organisation so that we can continue to provide our services, but more effectively, with ever more significant impacts. “I want to see our organisational capability grow, but also the capability of our leadership team. Over the years I learnt the differences between management and leadership. You need both skills in an organisation. Whereas management is about managing people day-to-day, leadership is about taking people on a journey with you to a destination. “And the end result of our journey as DCM is not only to see our people housed – but also to see them connected, valued, and thriving in their communities.” We mihi to Stephen for his courage and vulnerability in sharing his story with us. Please forward it on and encourage your friends and whānau to subscribe for our Ngā Kōrero updates. Support DCM Copyright © 2024 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM Te reo o te tangata – sharing the voice of our people in 2023 communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Te reo o te tangata – sharing the voice of our people in 2023 Ngā mihi o te tau hou from the team at DCM. It is good to look back before you look forward – and we are proud of the mahi we undertook last year as we gave our people a voice throughout 2023. At the start of the year, we expressed our concern about the rising cost of living and the ongoing housing crisis – and wondered how we would continue to support our people amid these significant challenges. But we were also excited by the prospect of two opportunities to give our whānau a voice in a major way – the March census and the October general election. We ensured these opportunities were accessible for our people, including having census workers and a polling booth right here at DCM, and it was exciting to see our whānau step up and make sure their voices were heard, and votes counted, in 2023. Stephen (centre) leads waiata in Te Aro Park as part of Neighbours Month, March 2023. DCM’s Manahautū (Director) Stephen Turnock, reflecting in our Annual Report, shared that 2023 presented a range of challenges for both whānau and communities across New Zealand. “However, it is the Loafers Lodge fire that will remain firmly in our hearts and minds as a senseless loss of life that could have been avoided. It is a stark reminder of the severe consequences that can result from poor housing conditions, legislation, regulation, and sector acceptance. “This tragedy and the premature deaths of many other whānau we have supported during the year highlight the ongoing health, social, and economic inequities experienced by the most vulnerable and the long pathway we have ahead of us to establish communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued, and thriving.” Despite the challenges we faced, there was always hope – and always in the voice of our people. Do you have a favourite DCM story from 2023? At the end of this email, we invite you to participate in a short survey. February – solving problems with Fahimeh In February, we shared the story of Fahimeh McGregor, who escaped the Iran Revolution, and, following her passion for study, made it to Malaysia and then New Zealand, where she soon turned her attention to giving back. Fahimeh has been solving the challenges of DCM’s processes and systems. “DCM has its challenges, but this has been the most enjoyable and rewarding project I’ve done,” Fahimeh shares. “You guys have got a passion for people. I can feel your heart beating for your whānau. That’s quite fascinating to me – everything is about them. Businesses often say they are customer-centric, but it’s not as tangible as you experience at DCM.” You can read Fahimeh’s story here (link opens a PDF). March – Keri’s story and Census Week at DCM In March, we shared the story of Keri, who has a large number 13 tattooed across his right cheek. It’s unmissable – but it’s slowly starting to fade as Keri undergoes laser tattoo removal. Keri has been judged harshly for his tattoo, with many people and organisations unwilling to engage with him. He explains why this might be. “Number 13 is Mongrel Mob. We do all of our patchings on the 13th.” But Keri threw in his patch several years ago – and is now independent and thriving in his own whare. We invite you to look back on his story here. In March, we also shared the story of Census Week at DCM, during which 70 whānau were assisted to have their voices heard. We were blown away by the Stats NZ workers who joined us for a week to make the process as effortless as possible for our people. Read all about it here. April – Neighbours Month and the Noho Pai team In April, we shared how DCM took part in Neighbours Aotearoa throughout the month of March with waiata in Te Aro Park – and how a chess tournament easily became a highlight of our year. We also went on the road with DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) Team, whose demanding and time-consuming mahi involves supporting whānau to sustain their tenancies. But how challenging it can be to stay housed after you have spent years living rough. Maybe you’re dealing with unaddressed mental health issues such as hoarding. Maybe you have an addiction. Maybe you were never taught how to do housework or to cook. Maybe your mates need somewhere to stay, but their behaviour disrupts other tenants. We were so inspired by the Noho Pai Team, who do everything they can to support this most vulnerable group of people. We invite you to have another read of the story here (link opens a PDF). May – Aro Mai Housing First in the Hutt and Michelle’s story In May, we shared the story of DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First Team based in the Hutt. This team has new digs, which we look forward to showing you soon. We also shared the story of Michelle, who came to the attention of concerned Hutt residents after sleeping in a bus stop. Our persistent Aro Mai team kept meeting with Michelle until she was able to overcome some significant obstacles and access housing. Michelle is still housed in her whare by the beach, and you can look back on her story here. June – Te Rahi o DCM and Whaea Jenny In June, we shared our new film clip – Te Rahi o DCM – as we heard from our Manahautū Stephen, other members of the DCM team, and whānau like Hapi and Smurf, who shared some of their story. We got to see our carving group in action and other cultural activities such as our daily waiata. Amidst the activities, we also saw DCM’s Whaea Jenny, whose role as Toa is to support the development and implementation of DCM’s Te Ao Māori strategic approach. Whaea Jenny supports, mentors, and role models the organisation’s kaupapa Māori competency programme to strengthen our cultural capacity and capability. She is a champion of our kaupapa. You can read Jenny's inspiring story – in her own words – here. July – Reaching out with the Mayor In July, our guest writer, Lee-Anne Duncan, shared the story of Mayor Tory Whanau joining DCM’s Outreach Team to connect with people sleeping rough on Wellington’s streets. We loved getting to know our mayor – and going on outreach with our team brought new insights to Tory. “It’s been great to be here and see the notification process in action, and then to see the heart Rowan and Clifton have when they approach people in response. That’s how they deserve to be treated. I was already a big supporter of DCM but being out here today has taken it to the next level. “Seeing what’s happening here, and meeting the people, hearing the stories, it brings it home to me even more. If more Wellingtonians could experience what the Outreach Team sees each day, they would have a greater understanding of homelessness, and how we must protect our most vulnerable.” Read the full story here. August – Hauora services at DCM In August, we explored hauora, the Māori philosophy of health and wellbeing unique to Aotearoa, and the various ways DCM offers hauora services, transforming lives each and every day. We looked at whānau (defined as support networks), tinana (physical health and functioning), hinengaro (psychological and emotional wellbeing), wairua (beliefs regarding connectedness and spirituality), taio (the physical environment), and iwi katoa (services and systems that provide support within the hauora environment). DCM has tangible ways to support each of these concepts – but this was a challenging story to bring together! Have another read of it here. September – Adam’s story In September, we invited you to walk a mile in Adam’s shoes. The road that leads to someone experiencing homelessness can be long and winding – the result of a complex set of circumstances. But for others, it can be sudden, unexpected, and very scary. For Adam, who is working with DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) Team, homelessness started with an assault which Adam says “Was the catalyst for a really big bump in the road, which lasted over a decade”. You can read his amazing story here. (Some of you reached out to offer financial assistance so Adam could travel down to Christchurch to see his whānau for Christmas. Adam and his brother were able to do that thanks to your support.) October – Ensuring the most marginalised have a voice at the General Election In October, DCM launched a new fundraiser – the Walk a Mile Challenge – on 10 October (World Homeless Day). We also shared the story of election week at DCM, where we had a polling booth, just as we did in 2020. In the lead-up to this year’s election, we started the process of checking people’s enrolment details, quickly finding that many had fallen off the electoral roll due to a change of address or having no fixed abode. We were able to take whānau through the enrolment process by sitting alongside them – often using DCM as their address – ensuring that filling out forms and providing personal details wasn’t a barrier. This year, DCM’s Ailish popped on the Electoral Commission’s orange vest to work as a Voter Assistant, ensuring our people had a familiar face when it came time to cast their vote. Our people stood up to have their say again, and you can read all about it here. November – Aro Mai Housing First in Wellington In November, we went on the road with the Aro Mai Housing First Team, based in Wellington. We joined Liz, who assisted Anthony into a place, and Shaun, our Kaiārahi Whiwhinga, whose job it is to meet with people like Anthony – to find out what their needs are, and based on that information, go out and search for a permanent home of their own. We spoke to a private landlord and talked to some of our other staff, including John, Portia and Barrie – the kaiārataki (leader) of DCM’s Piki te Kaha Pou, which encompasses Aro Mai Housing First and Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies). Read the full story of the incredible work undertaken by DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team (link opens a PDF). December – Lives and smiles transformed at the DCM Dental Service Finally, in December, we shared the story of DCM’s emergency dental service, which has been operating since March 2016. Our dental service is the only one of its kind outside of hospital emergency departments in New Zealand. Over 800 individuals have had their lives and smiles transformed thanks to the expertise of DCM’s volunteer dentists, led by Dr. Sophie McKenna, our lead dentist. In 2023, we began creating dental impressions (diagnostic models or moulds) on-site at DCM and fitting whānau with partial plates – often of upper teeth. We were excited to share before and after photos of our whānau. Have a look at them again, and read our story here. 2024 We begin 2024 hopeful that the great progress made to tackle the housing crisis will continue, knowing that DCM will be there to support the most marginalised of our city, no matter what – just as we have done over the past 55 years. This year, we look forward to celebrating Neighbours Month in March, and Matariki will be another important date on our calendar. But most of all, we look forward to sharing the stories of our people, giving them a voice, and lifting up their mana. We hope you will feel similarly uplifted as you read them. Ngā mihi maioha You can help us by completing a short survey about our Ngā Kōrero updates. We all regularly get asked to fill out surveys – so if you can assist with ours, please know it means a lot! And thank you to those who get back to us in between times. Click here for our Ngā Kōrero Survey Support DCM Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM Lives and smiles transformed at the DCM Dental Service communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Lives and smiles transformed at the DCM Dental Service DCM’s emergency dental service has been operating since March 2016 – and is the only dental service of its kind outside of hospital emergency departments in New Zealand. Over 800 individuals have had their lives and smiles transformed thanks to the expertise of DCM’s volunteer dentists, led by Dr. Sophie McKenna, our lead dentist. Volunteer dentist Dr. Sophie McKenna leads DCM’s Dental Service. (Source: 1News.) Sophie’s father was a dentist, and she worked with him as a dental assistant during the school holidays. By the age of 17, she had decided that dentistry was a good path for her. Marrying Andrew, a fellow dentist, and working in different practices in the Wellington area, the two were able to share work and parenting responsibilities. Sophie first heard about DCM at a New Zealand Dental Association branch meeting, putting her name forward as a volunteer. “DCM was a surprise to me,” says Sophie. “I didn’t expect to receive so much pleasure from helping the whānau with their dental care. “When I first began volunteering, our son was dealing with significant health challenges, and I was at a low point. To come into DCM and see good people working hard to improve themselves from their very low points, with the support of DCM staff, was humbling and put my own woes into perspective.” Sophie explains that many of the people coming to DCM’s Dental Service need fillings, periodontal work, and extractions. “They often come to us with broken and missing teeth. When you are experiencing homelessness, living from crisis to crisis, oral health care may fall lower on the priority list, especially due to the expense. “But the big key to DCM’s success is not that treatment is free – but that DCM makes marginalised people feel so welcome when they come here. They don’t feel judged – and that includes when they sit in our dental chair.” Sophie treats Ngata during an emergency dental session at DCM. (Source: 1News.) “I’ll say, ‘what’s the most important thing that I can help you with today?’ And they look astonished,” says Sophie. “They are normally told to lie back, open up, and then a health professional gives them a carefully worded lecture about what isn’t being done, how disastrous things are. “And that’s not we’re here for. We’re here to make them feel better.” We know that poor oral health has been linked to gingivitis, oral infection, heart disease and strokes. But additionally, aesthetic issues can affect your ability to eat and speak – with a huge cost to your self-esteem. DCM Manahautū (Director) Stephen Turnock says that most of the people DCM works with have missing or decayed teeth, and the feelings of shame around this can take a toll. “When someone is continually looking at the ground, and not wanting to smile or feeling whakamā, then that creates more barriers.” This is why in 2023, we have begun creating dental impressions (diagnostic models or moulds) on-site at DCM and fitting whānau with partial plates – often of upper teeth. Sophie has been joined in this initiative by her husband, Andrew, who is no longer able to practice dentistry on his own due to an injury. Still wanting to support DCM, Andrew is able to assist Sophie in various ways. Sophie shares how life-changing their work has already been. Toko before and after. Toko was someone with missing incisors – the most visible teeth in the upper mouth. Sophie and Andrew created a mould and fitted him with replacement teeth. “Toko was exceptionally happy with the partial plate, and his ‘after’ smile filled the room!” says Sophie. Another person whose smile has been transformed is Lisa. Lisa has experienced homelessness, including rough sleeping, before she was housed through DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First service. From there, she was able to focus on her wellbeing, including her oral healthcare. Lisa before and after. Sophie had to encourage Lisa to do a ‘before’ photo while smiling so we could compare the results. “Now she can’t stop smiling!” Sophie says. When DCM first met Simon, he had little to smile about. DCM Outreach workers Ngaire and Hazel approached him on the street in Kilbirnie, where he says he was at his lowest ebb. “DCM saved my life, literally” Simon explains. “If there’s a God, it was great timing on all fronts.” Simon also survived the Loafers Lodge fire. On the tragic night, he knocked on people’s doors, urging them to evacuate, while managing to escape with his phone and wallet, and the clothes on his back. After a move into transitional housing, Simon was able to concentrate on other pressing matters, including agonising dental pain. He popped into DCM one day, and met Ali Janes, who coordinates our dental clinic. Ali got Simon in to see Sophie and Andrew, who extracted the problem teeth. “You could really see the difference it had made for him, which was awesome,” says Ali. “He left pain free and basically floated out of here!” Simon was left with very few teeth, but Sophie and Andrew supported him through the life-changing process of getting a full denture. “I’m still learning to smile properly, which is something I haven’t done for a long time,” Simon explains. “But – I can almost look in the mirror again. “When I needed DCM the most, you guys have always been there. Now I’m trying to pay it forward.” Simon popped into DCM to show us his new smile. DCM’s new initiative creating replacement teeth for whānau has been supported by a $5,000 community grant from the New Zealand Dental Association. “My vision for DCM’s Dental Service is that we are able to expand our services a little,” says Sophie. “Ideally, we would like to offer more opportunities to replace teeth that have previously been extracted, as we’ve been doing with the grant this year. “Currently, relief of pain is great, but what can we do to support our lovely people and lift them up even more? It is obvious from the beaming smiles of Toko, Lisa and others that restoring their smile boosts their sense of worth. Society inadvertently judges those with missing teeth. “When someone’s smile is restored and they feel and look good, they project a confidence and positivity that is difficult to measure. It is infused in their posture, their willingness to engage with others – and we see that their approach to issues that challenge them is altered for the better. “It’s a no-brainer to try to help with this more.” We mihi to Sophie and Andrew McKenna for their passion and professional expertise as they help to transform the lives and smiles of our whānau. Can you help support DCM’s Dental Service this Christmas? DCM is grateful to all those dentists who, like Sophie and Andrew, give their time to allow us to provide emergency dental care to the most marginalised people in Wellington. We would also like to thank the NZDA for their community grant, the St. John’s in the City Carter Fund for a grant toward a new dental chair for our service, and the Bowen Hospital Trust for their on-going support. But DCM’s Dental Service is primarily funded by YOU, the people of Wellington. If you would like to support the most marginalised people in our city – like Toko, Lisa, and Simon this Christmas – please click below and consider donating toward our appeal. Or, if you know a dentist or dental assistant who would like to learn more about working at the DCM Dental Service, we would love to hear from them! Support DCM's Dental Service Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero Special - BIG THANK YOUS Concert this Sunday
      • Ngā Kōrero Special - BIG THANK YOUS Concert this Sunday Several great musical acts are coming together to help end homelessness in support of DCM's Walk a Mile Fundraiser communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Concert in support of DCM’s Walk a Mile Fundraiser The official conclusion of our Walk a Mile Challenge fundraiser is the BIG THANK YOUS concert at San Fran, 171 Cuba Street, this Sunday 26 November, 5-9pm. And we have some sensational entertainment for you! Laura Collins and the Back Porch Blues Band are masterful entertainers, moving seamlessly between ballsy blues and soulful ballads. Seamus Johnson delivers blistering vocals and guitar chops: you will think you’re listening to a whole band. Dr. Blue is a must-see for all-out entertaining roots. Beans performs beautifully written folk songs. Two Times is a band that will keep your toes tapping. Tickets are just $20 each, an absolute steal but we wanted to make it affordable for everyone. Get yours right here, right now! Click below... Big Thank Yous Tickets There will also be a charity art auction run by Dunbar Sloane, including art works by DCM’s own whānau, like Hapi and Jason! The line-up Laura Collins and the Back Porch Blues Band are dynamic, masterful and all about entertainment. Laura, with high energy and vocal strength, moves between ballsy blues and soulful ballads. She gives her band license to shine and shine they do; Wayne Mason, master of boogie ‘burning it up’ on the keys, John O’Connor ‘eating it up’ on lead guitar, George Barris on warm upright bass and Pete Cogswell on back porch drums ‘putting the car in drive’. Seamus Johnson has been described as a one man musical sensation. With blistering vocals and guitar chops you will think you’re listening to a whole band. Fresh back from touring with Sea Mouse, Seamus is here to bring some authentic old school blues! Beans is a recent addition to the Wellington folk scene, importing a wild array of original songs all the way from deepest, darkest Yorkshire. They gained international acclaim in 2021 as a finalist in the Liverpool International Song Contest and have since performed across Australia and Aotearoa. Embodying the classic singer-songwriter formula, Beans’ live shows are rich with humour, honesty and interesting word choices. Expect to feel things. Mike ‘Dr. Blue’ Mckeon is an international award winning multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and poet. ‘With a unique brand of early blues’ (Blues in Britain Magazine), ‘Mesmerizing’ (Broadway Baby), ‘A sensation’ (Otago Daily Times). STOP PRESS – Dr. Blue will be joined by Vicky Weeds, a singer, cellist, and burlesque darling from Pōneke. She has been performing around Aotearoa since 2011 and in 2019 won the Wellington Alternative Performing Arts Award for favourite cabaret performance. Two Times is a toe-tapping covers band regularly entertaining audiences around the Wellington region. Expect to groove to all your favourite hits. Not only will Beans perform for us, but they have also been walking a mile in support of DCM! Here's a song Beans wrote while out and about... A Mile in These Shoes by Beans DCM is truly grateful to all those people who have been walking a mile a day in support of our mahi to create communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving. For many years, DCM held an annual Bookfair, and ever since we have been hoping to find a new fundraiser that connects in a meaningful way with the work we do with the most marginalised people in our city. The Walk a Mile Challenge and BIG THANKS YOUS Concert provide an opportunity for us to come together as a community to support DCM, and raise the pūtea we need to keep our essential services running. We look forward to connecting with you on Sunday. Can’t make it? Please forward this to anyone you know who may like to come along. Or, if you'd like to support one of the individuals or teams walking a mile in support of DCM, click here. Big Thank Yous Tickets Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero – Latest Stories from DCM Aro Mai Housing First – working together to end homelessness in Wellington communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Aro Mai Housing First – working together to end homelessness in Wellington Today we share the story of DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First service. This service sits alongside DCM’s other programmes aimed at ending homelessness, such as Toru Atu (Outreach), and Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies). Aro Mai works in unison with them and other programmes at DCM and is itself a collaboration with Emerge Aotearoa, Wellington Homeless Women’s Trust, and Tākiri Mai Te Ata. At the heart of Aro Mai Housing First are the people. To get referred to Aro Mai, you will need to have experienced rough sleeping for at least a year; and you will have multiple and complex needs, likely including addictions and mental health challenges. The Housing First approach means that you’ll be moved swiftly into appropriate housing, with support wrapped around you by DCM’s team. In theory, this means that people at the sharpest end of the homelessness spectrum shouldn’t have to sit on social housing waiting lists; they shouldn’t have to flounder in unsuitable emergency housing or have to earn a place of their own through transitional housing. It’s in the name – Housing First. In practice, the reality is that amid New Zealand’s ongoing housing crisis, there just aren’t enough options available for people experiencing homelessness. They are at the bottom rung of the housing ladder, having been regulated to second-class citizenship all their lives. Fortunately, DCM has a long track record of breaking down barriers for the most marginalised. Thanks to the support of many people in the community, we can and do find permanent homes for our people – so that they can be housed, connected, valued, and thriving. Porirua – where DCM has met a number of people sleeping rough. Liz Liz has arranged to meet Anthony on a street corner in Porirua. Today, she is going to drive him into Wellington to sign up for a tenancy in an old motor inn that has been transformed by Emerge Aotearoa into transitional housing. Anthony has stayed in transitional housing before – but didn’t cope well with the lack of privacy and intrusions into his space. Emerge do things differently – and at the motor inn, he will have his own room, bathroom, and cooking facilities, with round-the-clock security at the front door. For the last several months, Anthony has been sleeping rough, including under a bridge. He says that he’s been homeless on and off for 10 years, living for a while in a tent. DCM’s Outreach team first connected with him many years ago – and he is well-known to other services in Wellington. Anthony signs documents with Emerge so he can move into his new room. At the motor inn, Anthony signs several documents and is given a swipe card and key – the place is his now. But he wants to go back to Porirua where all his stuff is stashed – and he makes plans to come back to the motor inn next week. Liz drives him back to Porirua but along the way, Anthony has a change of heart. If he can get some food, maybe he can use the new air fryer Emerge has provided, and cook himself a meal. His eyes have lit up, and it’s the clincher Liz needs. After a quick run around the supermarket for the basics – white bread, milk, sausages, eggs – Anthony just needs to get his stuff and it’s back to Wellington. But under the bridge, Anthony’s stuff is gone. It’s possible that his things have been missing for a while – and Liz will come back to check – but for now, it’s already 4pm on a Friday, and it’s time for Anthony to enjoy his new place. In particular, he’s looking forward to having a long shower. Liz with Anthony in his new room, where he can stay for at least the next 90 days. On the drive back, Anthony is reflective. “It will be good to have a stable first point,” he says, thinking ahead. “Maybe I can cook a meal on Christmas Day.” Back at DCM, Liz is not satisfied. She looks around for spare clothes, finds some basics, and heads back to the motor inn. Anthony has arrived with only the clothes on his back. Shaun Shaun is DCM’s Kaiārahi Whiwhinga – housing procurement specialist. It’s his job to meet with people like Anthony – to find out what their needs are, and based on that information, go out and search for a permanent home of their own. “We ask them quite simple questions about where they want to live,” says Shaun. “Then we ask a few more questions to try and refine that. We get all their housing needs in that assessment and then we use that information to procure properties through the private market or Kāinga Ora.” Liz has a chat with Shaun about one of the people on her caseload. Shaun shares that support of Kāinga Ora has increased, with 15 whānau successfully housed in Kāinga Ora properties over the last six months. But a key focus continues to be on the private market. Shaun utilises online listing websites like myRent and TradeMe to search for properties based on the needs of whānau, refined by location, number of bedrooms, and funding limits. “And then it’s almost like cold calling,” Shaun says. “Most of the time they have read your message and they don’t want to hear it. It’s not something we’re interested in, they say. “Sometimes, we get a different response – a feeling that they understand our kaupapa. I’m transparent with the work we do, who we work with, and the risks involved. But there are so many benefits – we’ve got the maintenance and inspections covered by Emerge. The rent is guaranteed, and Housing First landlords are exempt from tax changes to interest deductibility. It’s a win-win.” Shaun explains that insurance has been an issue for Aro Mai in the past – with insurance companies refusing community housing providers. “But now Emerge has worked out an insurance package with Crombie Lockwood. We can now say to landlords, we’ve got you covered. We have a pathway forward.” Shaun hits the phone in search of the next property for Aro Mai. Len Len first read about Aro Mai Housing First in a DCM newsletter when we shared the story of one of our Housing First landlords, Dev. “I thought, gosh, we could do that,” says Len. “I have a small crib in Kakanui – my grandfather put some army huts together there in the 1930s, so it’s more of a family heirloom. But my wife Shirley is totally averse to us owning a crib in a housing crisis. It got me thinking, why am I as somebody who is moderately well off competing with a young couple buying their first house?” Len sat down with Dwell Housing Trust, providing funds for an apartment, while Dwell worked out an arrangement with DCM to provide the property for the Housing First programme. A young man who has been homeless for many years is now supported by DCM to thrive in the home while he deals with significant health issues. The unit is ideal as it has a front door ramp, wide access door frames, and a wet bathroom. Len Cook is a former Statistics New Zealand chief executive and Families Commissioner. He was involved with the Royal Commission on Social Policy in the 1980s and continues to have a passion for a fair society, especially in the justice system. Photo by Gerard O’Brien/Otago Daily Times. “To be honest, for me and Shirley it’s an ideal arrangement because we don’t want to be landlords,” Len says. “I don’t really like the idea of intruding and inspecting on other people’s lives. “Now we’ve raised the Housing First concept to a few friends with some cash and said why don’t you think about this? People are surprised when you tell them about the approach. It’s radical, but it leaves the expertise in the hands of the people that have it. I have one or two friends who rent properties at my age or older and you know, I feel sorry for them!” John John is another kaimahi with Aro Mai Housing First. Like others on the team, he works with approx. 10 people at any given time, supporting them to make the leap from homelessness to permanent housing. Michael is one of the whānau on his caseload. Like many others, he had been staying in emergency housing, and is now in transitional housing while he awaits a permanent place. Michael with his key worker, John. Michael loves his room. “It’s nice and quiet,” he says. “I feel safe here.” For Michael, one of the best things about this place is that no visitors are allowed. He shares that it’s good for him to focus on himself right now. When Michael does get out and about, it’s often to visit DCM, where our Te Pae Manaaki Tangata service connects him to the health and other supports he needs. Often, that might just be a cup of coffee at Te Hāpai. Like many of our whānau, loneliness and social isolation can be an issue once people have moved into a new place. John has worked out a plan to get Michael into a permanent whare in time for Christmas. Michael would like his family to be able to visit him. And he is also working with John on getting a passport so he can travel to Samoa to visit them. Re-connecting with his culture and whānau is important for Michael, and it really helps that John can speak Samoan with him. It especially helps when John takes him along to MSD or doctor’s appointments – sometimes it’s easier explaining things in Michael’s own language. Portia Portia is kaiāwhina – a peer support worker – with DCM. She has been supporting another member of the Aro Mai Housing First team, Alisi, with her caseload, during a period of illness. Today, Portia is off on a home visit to Fiona’s place – a permanent whare provided by Kāinga Ora. Fiona lives up several flights of stairs despite recovering from surgery on her foot. This whare was her choice – as soon as she saw it, she knew it would make the perfect home. “I’ve spent my whole life in the dark,” Fiona says. “But I’ve found my place now.” Portia visits Fiona in her whare. Fiona’s whare has a stunning view over Newtown, and is a far cry from her previous place which Portia explains was literally dark, with gang members coming and going, and rubbish everywhere. Fiona, having been a cleaner for much of her life, would tidy up after everyone. Now, Fiona says, she has found the right place for her. And despite her recent surgery, she is already talking about getting a job, maybe as a cleaner again. She has put up pictures of her ancestors on the walls, and her focus is to ensure the wairua of her whare is well. Barrie Barrie is the kaiārataki (leader) of DCM’s Piki te Kaha Pou, which encompasses Aro Mai Housing First and Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies). Barrie was previously the kaiārahi of the Aro Mai team in the Hutt, so has wide-ranging experience and is used to having an ear close to the ground. “DCM’s vision for our whānau is that they are housed, connected, valued, and thriving – and this sits at the heart of our Aro Mai Housing First service,” Barrie says. “However, amid New Zealand’s ongoing housing crisis, a roof realistically means emergency or transitional housing while our team procures the right property that meets the needs of our whānau. And so, over the last year, DCM has supported 289 people into emergency accommodation, and 81 into transitional housing, with 45 people supported into permanent, long-term, safe, secure homes of their own. “Every one of those 45 whānau has an inspiring story of courage and survival to tell, which makes our work so rewarding.” Jane and Regina (centre front) are kaiārahi of DCM's Aro Mai Housing First service, based in Wellington. Here they are pictured with a handful of the Aro Mai team, clockwise from left: Adriana, Alisi, Daniel, Lotu, Liz, Desirae, Sarah, Cindel, and John. Barrie shares that in the coming year, DCM is looking forward to many new housing options opening up for our people, including 20 units earmarked for Aro Mai Housing First at Te Kī a Alasdair – The Voice of Alasdair. This development has come about thanks to our very special landlords, Maurice and Kaye Clark, in honour and memory of their son Alasdair. Thanks to hard work and relationship-building, Barrie also shares that DCM has now established a working relationship with Kāinga Ora, in which both parties are aware of each other’s needs, requirements and processes. And private landlords still have a role to play. “They have shown us they too can be part of the solution to homelessness,” Barrie says. WORDS/IMAGES: MATTHEW MAWKES. Can you help? Provide a home If you would like to know more about how you can provide homes for the people we are supporting out of homelessness, please get in touch with our Kaiārahi Whiwhinga, Shaun. We need staff DCM needs a new kaiārahi (team leader) and a new kaimahi to join our Aro Mai Housing First team in the Hutt. If you know anyone who may like to join our team, please let them know we have some jobs going! Big Thank Yous! On Sunday 26 November, we are holding an event in support of DCM’s Walk a Mile Fundraiser at San Fran, 171 Cuba Street, from 5-9pm. Several great musical acts are coming together to help end homelessness – supporting the work of DCM with those who need it most. And you can help too, by buying tickets to see Laura Collins & the Back Porch Blues Band, one-man musical sensation Seamus Johnson, the one and only Dr. Blue, esoteric folk songwriter Beans, and toe-tapping band Two Times. The Big Thank Yous event also features a charity art auction, with pieces from local and well-known artists, including people who have utilised DCM services. Tickets are only $20 – and you can get them here: Big Thank Yous Tickets Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Election Week at DCM
      • Election Week at DCM Ensuring the most marginalised have a voice at the General Election. communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Election Week at DCM Ensuring the most marginalised have a voice at the General Election The Electoral Commission team at DCM: Ailish, Te Rangi, Hayden, Allan and Sharon. It is Election Day in Aotearoa. All week, we have had a polling booth right here at DCM to ensure people who are experiencing homelessness can vote and have their voices heard at the General Election. Our desire to have a polling booth at DCM came about after we heard about one of our whānau – with literacy and other significant challenges – walking away from a polling booth in frustration after finding the process too difficult. We knew that we could never let that happen again. And so, after months of preparation alongside the Electoral Commission, 101 whānau voted at DCM in October 2020, many for the very first time in their lives. Peter (left), our first voter in 2020, celebrates after exiting the polling booth; Trevor (right) was among a number of first-time-voting whānau in 2020. Many of these whānau were Māori, like Peter, our first voter in 2020, while some, like Trevor, are no longer with us. Trevor told us that he had never voted before due to various stretches in prison. We were thrilled that he was able to vote at least once in his lifetime. Needless to say, there was never a doubt in our mind that DCM had to be a polling booth again! In the lead-up to the 2023 election, we started the process of checking people’s enrolment details, quickly finding that many had fallen off the electoral roll due to a change of address or having no fixed abode. We were able to take whānau through the enrolment process by sitting alongside them – often using DCM as their address – ensuring that filling out forms and providing personal details wasn’t a barrier. We also facilitated discussions in Te Hāpai and were delighted to have a familiar face from 2020, Erin Marsh, Senior Advisor for Community Engagement with the Electoral Commission, join us for a ‘practice voting’ session. Meda enrols for the election with assistance from Erin. Erin says, “Getting to come in and talk with the whānau before voting started was something I feel was an important part of the process in making sure that everyone felt comfortable, safe and well supported when it came time to actually vote. We got some great questions about what to expect, how to mark the voting paper and what to do if you needed to cast a special vote. As always, the staff at DCM were welcoming and made us feel very much at home.” Another familiar face joining us this year was Te Rangi Waaka – our Voting Place Manager. “There’s been a lot of excitement and a lot of fun yarns and a few jokes here and there,” says Te Rangi. “They keep asking about lollies, so Sharon ended up getting some, and everyone’s been taking one! “It’s lovely to do the opening karakia and waiata. Then you can meet everybody, and they know you when they come in the door. It’s nice to be here at DCM – it’s great to facilitate and help what you guys do.” DCM’s Manahautū (Director) Stephen Turnock with Te Rangi getting ready for another day of voting. Thanks to all of these efforts, voting has been accessible for many at DCM. This included a number of profoundly deaf whānau who were able to vote with assistance from our team. Ailish knows basic sign language and has been completing her social work degree while on placement at DCM. She popped on the Electoral Commission’s orange vest to work as a Voter Assistant this year to ensure our people had another familiar face when it came time to cast their vote. “It’s so important to get our people to vote,” says Ailish. “If it wasn’t set up here, they probably wouldn’t have voted. We’ve had a few people who have lived through many elections but this is their first time voting. Others are very passionate and well informed about what’s going on and who they are going to vote for.” Ailish assists Jeff, one of our deaf community, to vote. It has been insightful talking to our people about what has inspired them to vote this year. Our first voter of the week, Mahir, simply said, “I’m voting because it’s the right thing to do.” Others are concerned about what they perceive as imminent threats to beneficiaries. Patrick told us, “I’m voting for the underprivileged and for the party who will best regulate the drugs and help the homeless folk.” He added his concern about which party is best equipped to work with gangs instead of working against them. Larry told us he was voting for the party he thought best supports New Zealand’s sustainability. And Robert came out of the polling booth, commenting, “That was great! It made me feel like I was a part of something.” Numerous young first-time voters have walked through our door this year. This included Magic who would not have voted without DCM’s polling booth. Being a part of something is our vision for our whānau. We want them to be counted, have their voices heard, and vote. “Democracy only works if voices from every part of society are heard,” says Erin. “And it’s especially important that our marginalised communities get to vote as their voices go unheard in so many other areas.” DCM’s Director Stephen adds, “I think that it’s really important that people utilise opportunities regardless of your situation or your environment, to have your voice heard. Everyone’s voice is important. Everyone should be supported to exercise their democratic right in terms of choosing who it is that they want to represent them and make decisions for them in their lives.” Sia encourages some of our wahine to vote. “A lot of people are disenfranchised by our system,” says Ailish. “Many of our whānau don’t understand that politics can have an impact on them. But when you explain that it’s the politicians who are in charge of the justice system, the tax system, WINZ – which is a lot of their lives – then that starts to change things. “I just wish that the world could be a bit fairer and that everyone could have access to quality housing – because that is not always the case when you have a roof over your head. Sometimes it’s not a sustainable place, it’s not a place where you can thrive, it’s not always a safe place. I feel like a lot of people just want to pretend that homeless people don’t exist. I would like to see them be included in society, and that is what we’re achieving here.” WORDS/IMAGES: MATTHEW MAWKES. Together we can make big strides to end homelessness Our call to action this month is straightforward: VOTE! But there is another thing you can do to support DCM and the people we are working with. You can join our Walk a Mile Challenge, you can also support those who are already walking, and, as always, you can share this update far and wide. Thank you for your support of those in Wellington who need us most. Join the Walk a Mile Challenge Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero Special - We're launching the Walk a Mile Challenge fundraiser
      • Ngā Kōrero Special - We're launching the Walk a Mile Challenge fundraiser Step up and TOGETHER we can end homelessness - here's the details communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Walk a Mile Challenge – step up and together we can end homelessness Today is World Homeless Day. The perfect time to officially launch our Walk a Mile challenge. And we had the perfect weather in Te Aro Park this lunch time. Walk a Mile is a sponsored walk with a difference. We’re asking you to just walk a mile each day for up to 30 days in a pair of old shoes: just everyday distances rather than one big hike. Recruit sponsors and raise funds. You can walk anywhere and anytime that suits, including walking to work, to school, walk the dog, to your favourite lunch spot. And 1 mile is just 800m there and back. Anyone can take part in the Walk a Mile challenge, from school age to pensioner. In fact, companies or schools can also encourage staff or pupils to club together and form teams to support each other’s fundraising. It's is all done through the Givealittle website, so there’s no collecting signatures or cash either. Sign up, step up and walk a mile with us; www.walkamile.org.nz . Why old shoes? A lot of people who have very little, or nothing, get by with old shoes. You don’t have to use old shoes to take part in the Walk a Mile challenge, but it is a good way of showing that you are walking alongside the people who need your help. The graphic image of a pair of old shoes was conceived and produced by one of the people we support. It’s professionally done and it looks great. It’s just one example of how people who have experienced homelessness often have great gifts, talents and experience. We should support them and celebrate the value they can bring to our lives. . Don't forget to sign up, step up, and together we can end homelessness. walkamile.org.nz And please forward this on to anyone you know who may like to take part. . Walk a Mile Challenge Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM Walk a Mile in My Shoes – Adam’s Story – Taking big strides at DCM communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Walk a Mile in My Shoes – Adam’s Story Today, we invite you to walk a mile in Adam’s shoes. We are inspired by his journey from homelessness to housing and greater wellbeing. We lift him up for sharing his story with us. Ngā manaakitanga, Adam! The road that leads to someone experiencing homelessness can be long and winding – the result of a complex set of circumstances such as poverty, familial breakdown, substance use and mental health difficulties. For some of the people we meet at DCM, it is sadly not always a surprise. They are often men who are Māori, over 40, who have been in institutional care, and victims of abuse. But for others, homelessness can be sudden, unexpected, and very scary. For Adam, who is working with Ava from DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) team, homelessness started with an assault which Adam says “Was the catalyst for a really big bump in the road, which lasted over a decade”. Adam speaks very highly of his family – especially his mum – but he had a rough start, especially since his dad was “a criminal basically”. “He was a car thief,” says Adam, “And that would’ve been quite stressful on mum, me and my brother. One day, he wigged out, and there was a 16-hour stand-off at our house with mum at knifepoint and me and my brother in the cupboard.” Adam’s dad got 25 years, but soon, “Mum being mum thought, ‘Well the kids have gone through a tough time, and I need to do something’, so she got a job, and that’s where she found Dave.” Adam believes that Dave “pretty much saved the family”. “He came in and did a superlative job on me and my brother. I consider us both good guys – we’ve got our scruples and our morals right.” “They were strict, and when I got into trouble, it wasn’t the police I was thinking about – it was mum. ‘Oh my God, I’ve gotta deal with mum!’ I’d come home in various states of inebriation, and one day I went too far and rushed past mum – into the toilet – with her outside shouting, ‘You shouldn’t drink!’ as I answered, ‘Bleugh! Yes, mum!’” Adam’s family moved to Wellington when he was 11 or 12, and when describing what school was like, Adam laughs and admits, “I was evil!” But he quickly corrects himself. “Not evil, that’s the wrong word entirely. I was mischievous, I got up to some stuff. Some of it was peer pressure. Guys would come up to you and say, ‘Look, let’s do this’ – and it would seem like a great idea, especially if you’ve had a few.” Adam describes his teenage years as colourful, with lots of partying. “I had a ball. We had a ball. We had a great time. But friends died along the way.” Adam lost some close friends to car accidents, but despite these tragedies, has many happy memories from his younger days. Still, even as he got older, being told off by mum was no fun, so Adam worked at a veterinary clinic, supermarkets, and $2 shops. Later, he studied journalism. “I enjoyed finding the facts, interviewing people – all that kind of thing. That was where the fun was, and I got quite a good reputation doing it. I’d have people wanting follow-up interviews which journalists don’t usually get – and if they do, they’ve done their job right.” One night, at a party, Adam was assaulted, first by one individual and then by another, who “laid into me”. “And that just started carrying on. I ended up homeless, living in a shed, and my doctor got me into ward 27.” Ward 27 – Te Whare o Matairangi – is Wellington’s 24-hour mental health treatment service for adults who are experiencing serious mental health concerns. Adam had to stay there for a month, after which he got a flat at the old Arlington Apartments. “It was horrible,” Adam says. “I spent a year there, I was depressed, I didn’t know anyone. It was a bad old year.” Adam’s brother moved in with him to the dingy one-bedroom apartment, but wanting a fresh start they were able to move into a shared flat in Porirua with Adam’s old schoolmate. After he moved out, followed some years later by his brother, Adam says, “All the people that were hanging around started beating me up – like hardcore.” “One dude baseball-batted me on the elbow for no reason except I’d put the kettle on and I hadn’t filled it up. I got my jaw broken by one fella. I came down early one morning and turned on the TV, and one dude grabbed a shoe, one of those plimsole shoes, and started beating me round the head with it. It perforated my eardrum. They were just idiots…” Escaping the violence of the communal living situation, Adam ended up at the now-defunct Night Shelter, where he says, “Things started ironing out”. Adam speaks very highly of Don, who used to manage the Night Shelter, and DJ, a DCM staff member who would regularly visit to support the men staying there and to help them look at long-term housing options. “That was the first time someone in a long time had done something for me.” Adam used to visit DCM’s Te Hāpai service regularly, as residents of the Night Shelter would have to leave early in the morning, and he accessed the Foodbank, as well as DCM’s emergency dental service. Like many of our whānau, Adam needed to have a few teeth out and a referral to the Oral Health Department at Wellington Hospital for replacement teeth. Adam was able to get a full upper denture so he could start smiling again. Adam is now permanently housed in a property provided by the Salvation Army – and he loves his place. “The price is good, and I’ve kept it nice. The garden is great, I enjoy getting the fresh air, sometimes watching people coming and going, and you get to see all types of birds. And I’ve got nice neighbours.” It is a struggle for Adam to get by on a benefit, and he would like to work again so he can get through the week and save up so he can visit his family in the South Island. Though Adam never saw his dad again after he went to prison, he remains close with his mum and stepdad. Adam has been working with Tipene, and now Ava, from DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) team. The Sustaining Tenancies mahi involves regular home visits to check that everything is going well in people’s homes, addressing any health concerns, ensuring people can live adequately on their income, and connecting them to their whānau and other supports. Ava says, “Adam’s such a lovely person. But the cost of living has been hard on him. He really wants to see his mum and stepdad in Christchurch, but it’s virtually impossible when you’re on a benefit. I would just love to see him with a job where his talents can shine through. That would be mana-enhancing for him.” Tipene describes how some of the people working with Noho Pai don’t draw out funds when they overpay on power bills – one of the few ways they are able to put money aside. Tipene says, “Adam really enjoys our company. He likes to say, ‘Let’s catch up and go for a coffee’. Just things that are normal in his life – people who treat him normally and ask things like, ‘What would your life look like if it was at its best?’ Having someone who does that can change your outlook on life.” Those conversations are part of the job at DCM as we walk a mile in the shoes of our whānau. Our vision is for communities where they are housed, connected, valued, and thriving. It is a big vision that we can only achieve if we walk a mile – together. WORDS/IMAGES: MATTHEW MAWKES. Coming soon: DCM Walk a Mile Challenge Let’s make big strides together! Every day, hundreds of individuals in the Wellington region face the harsh realities of homelessness; with no shelter, food, or hope. That’s where DCM steps in – building trust, offering a place to be together, providing essential medical services and other help, securing homes, and ensuring a smooth transition to stability. But we can’t do it alone. We need funds to keep our essential services running. And so, we’re excited to announce a new fundraising initiative: The Walk a Mile Challenge! About the fundraiser The Walk a Mile Challenge encourages participants to walk a mile each day for 30 days in a pair of old shoes. Like a sponsored walk, but everyday distances rather than one big hike. You can walk anywhere and anytime that suits. The challenge is designed to be flexible and inclusive, including walking to work, to school, walking the dog, or even just to your favourite lunch spot. And 1 mile is just 800m there and back. Take the first step If you can, please sign up to join in the fundraiser yourself. Hit reply to this email or click the button below, and we will be in touch with more details. Walk a Mile Challenge And feel free to spread the word and encourage your friends and whānau to sign up as well. We’ll be officially launching the Walk a Mile Challenge soon, so if you would like to support us on the day come along to: Te Aro Park Tuesday 10 October (World Homeless Day) 12-1:30pm If you have any questions at all, please feel free to contact DCM’s Kaimahi Pūrongo, Nigel Parry. Please join us so that together we can end homelessness. Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM Hauora services – transforming lives at DCM communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Hauora services Transforming lives at DCM Hauora is a Māori philosophy of health and wellbeing unique to Aotearoa. Here at DCM, we know from experience that when someone’s hauora is not where it should be, it can lead to many problems, including homelessness. And we know, from both experience and from what the data tells us, that homelessness can lead to an early death for many. Although the mortality rate varies between studies, typically people experiencing homelessness die 15 to 30 years younger than their housed counterparts. A New Zealand hospital-based study looked at risk factors for mortality in a cohort of homeless patients, which included 126 deaths with a median age of death of 52.6 years. Many of the patients had a record of cardiovascular disease and diabetes as well as mental health issues and substance misuse. Meanwhile, a large new study links loneliness or social isolation to a higher risk of an early death. People who experienced social isolation had a 32% higher risk of dying early from any cause compared with those who weren’t socially isolated. Participants who reported feeling lonely were 14% more likely to die early than those who did not. Images from DCM’s 50th anniversary photo exhibition – top left photo by John Williams; bottom left photo by Chris Bing; photo at right by Helen Mitchell. Our 50th anniversary was in 2019, but since then two out of the three whānau pictured in these images have passed away. On top of these alarming figures, while access to adequate medical care is considered a human right, we know that this is not always an option for the whānau we are working with at DCM. This is why we offer a range of hauora services right here on Lukes Lane – where the most marginalised and vulnerable people in our city come. If we can make them feel welcome here, we know that the easily accessible hauora services we have on-site can not only save lives, but start to transform lives, wherever people may be at. DCM looks to the Meihana Model to guide our practice in the provision of hauora services. The model is based on a double-hulled waka travelling through the ocean, impacted by the four winds and ocean currents. There are six core dimensions to the model: whānau (defined as support networks); tinana (physical health and functioning); hinengaro (psychological and emotional wellbeing); wairua (beliefs regarding connectedness and spirituality); taio (the physical environment); and iwi katoa (services and systems that provide support within the hauora environment). The four winds that can impact the waka are colonisation, racism, marginalisation, and migration. DCM recognises the correlation between these factors and how they have affected the health disparities, inequities and mana of our people. Our team works hard to mitigate and mediate these determinants to improve better health and wellbeing outcomes, reinforcing our organisation’s commitment to achieving goals paved in Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The ocean currents that support the course when they are harnessed correctly are āhua, tikanga, whānau and whenua. To assist us with steering these elements, we are grounded in our values of Manaakitanga (integrity, trust, sincerity), Kotahitanga (unity, collective action), Pono (walk the talk), Rangatiratanga (leadership, striving for excellence), Hihiritanga (striving for improvement), and Whanaungatanga (identity and belonging). The Meihana Model highlights the importance of the relationship we have with our whānau, to work alongside them, so we can navigate the most appropriate course together. The following demonstrates how DCM applies this lens through the services we offer. Music has a big role to play at DCM. Here Tui and Jenny join in waiata with Athena (right). Whānau Our whānau come to DCM from widely different backgrounds and experiences. DCM aims to understand the full picture of who our people are. Comprehensive assessments aid us in gathering the whakapapa of their past and present to help us assess their needs and plan for better future outcomes. These assessments often identify a disconnect or collapse that our people have in their relationships with their whakapapa, whether it be with whakapapa whānau (biological) or kaupapa whānau (key support people). When people don’t have whānau of their own, sometimes it is DCM who fulfil that support network. At DCM, our Te Hāpai service welcomes people who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness, providing a safe space where they can enjoy kai, kōrero and meaningful activities. Whānau will often pop by DCM on weekdays to catch up with one another – and with our staff too. And at the heart of our staff are DCM’s kaiāwhina – peer support workers with lived experience of their own. Who better to connect with people experiencing homelessness than those who have been through it themselves? Tinana DCM’s busy hub on Lukes Lane provides a range of hauora services to address people’s physical health and functioning. Leading this mahi is Ali Janes, whose title is Kaiārahi Te Pae Manaaki Tangata – Te Pae Manaaki Tangata means, “The place where people experience manaakitanga”, and is a gateway to DCM's hauora services. By rolling out the red carpet and helping marginalised people feel welcome, we hope that any barriers they may face in accessing medical care will fall away. DCM’s Ali (left) with Dr. Frances Ruddiman, a periodontist who specialises in dental surgery and the management of medically complex patients, and Clem, one of DCM’s dental assistants. Te Aro Health Te Aro Health Centre has been working with DCM for decades to bring healthcare to the community. Serena, a nurse from Te Aro Health, shares, “Te Aro Health provides primary healthcare services for people who are homeless or in precarious living situations, many of whom have mental health and addiction issues, and who suffer from the social determinants of health. We provide an outreach clinic at DCM three days a week where people can drop in and see us. It’s a great space because people feel comfortable coming here. Accessing the health services is an extension of their feeling comfortable in this space, and they can see us on their own terms. “I think that the most important work is the collaboration between our services – because our patients have such complex needs, we really depend on having DCM involved. This improves health outcomes like getting them along to secondary specialist appointments they may not otherwise attend. So, we’re often liaising with DCM, at the outreach clinic and in our general work. We make sure the services we provide are appropriate for them – are working for them. Or how can we be flexible to provide something else that meets their needs?” 30 to 45 whānau per week on average visit the Te Aro Health outreach clinics at DCM. Dental Service The cost-of-living crisis is affecting us all, and none more so than those who are already vulnerable, where expensive trips to a dentist may need to be sacrificed for something else. Fortunately, DCM provides a free dental service for people experiencing homelessness who are in urgent pain. It’s free thanks to dentists and dental assistants taking time away from private practices to treat our whānau in DCM’s fully equipped dental clinic. Our dental service is led by Dr. Sophie McKenna who was recently featured on TVNZ, noting how our hauora services empower our whānau. Watch the clip here. Says Sophie, “Dental pain is all consuming…to take them out of pain allows the head to clear a little. Maybe the advice and support that the DCM key workers are offering them – maybe can be taken on board that little bit better. “And then it becomes a cycle of everything on the mend for just getting that tooth fixed.” Hilory Randell had a painful tooth filled at the DCM clinic and is delighted with the results. (Source: 1News.) Sophie also comments on how different the DCM service is to other dental clinics and the positive nature of the experience for whānau. “I’ll say, ‘What’s the most important thing that I can help you with today?’ And they look astonished. They are normally told to lie back, open up, and then a health professional gives them a carefully worded lecture about what isn’t being done, how disastrous things are. “And that’s not what we’re here for. We’re here to make them feel better.” Physiotherapy Pain can be a familiar part of life for our whānau. Jeff Dixon, our volunteer physiotherapist comments, “Rough sleeping and lack of adequate housing can make it difficult to sleep in a comfortable position. The lack of sleep and psychological stress can then make pain worse.” Jeff sees whānau with a host of issues when they come through the doors at DCM, having treated “a variety of injuries – from simple sprained ankles to the results of stab wounds.” Jeff has been coming to DCM for over four years now, every fortnight, on a Friday. He usually sees a mixture of new patients, and those with long-term conditions who benefit from – to quote one of our whānau – his “magic hands”. Audiology Life is better when you can hear well. Our physical health services are growing as Clare, an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist), is coming on board to offer ear wax suction on-site at DCM. This has been a significant unmet need for our people for quite some time. Clare (centre, with Rebecca and Bronwyn from Te Aro Health), is an ear, nose and throat specialist, also known as an otolaryngologist, who is now able to offer her expertise on-site at DCM thanks to donated ear wax micro suction equipment. We recently said farewell to Gemma Sheehan, an audiologist who has volunteered at DCM for the past two years. During that time – despite the pandemic – Gemma was able to offer hearing tests and fit our whānau with hearing aids, to truly transform lives. We find that many of the people working with us at DCM suffer from hearing loss, which often goes back to the root causes of poverty. For example, we know that one of the most common causes of acquired, permanent hearing loss in children is meningitis. We are looking forward to welcoming a new audiologist to DCM soon. But in the meantime – thank you Gemma for your support of DCM! Pātaka Kai DCM has long had a Foodbank, and we acknowledge that kai is another way that we can support someone’s physical health. Sometimes the Foodbank can be an entry point into DCM services – and we can then move beyond kai to try to understand what other supports people may need. But in the meantime, kai supports sustenance, ensuring whānau have access to nutrition to prevent any debilitating of their tinana. Hinengaro Mental health and addictions are often co-occurring issues in the lives of our whānau. Our Te Awatea programme looks at addressing both through education and group work. Reon, whom Jo-Ann has been working with over a long period of time, has benefitted greatly from this service. Jo-Ann shares that one Friday morning she was photocopying material related to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs for the Te Awatea session when Reon asked if he could have a copy. Reon came back the following Tuesday and chatted with Jo-Ann about what he had read. Jo-Ann shares, “I realised that he read the whole thing. He started telling me how he could implement these things in his own life.” She has seen Reon’s decision-making change in a really positive way as a result. Jo-Ann with Reon – we are so proud of the progress he has made along his journey to wellbeing. Harm reduction is often the only model that can work for our people, who may have chronic conditions, face barriers from their past, and find it hard to access traditional addiction services. But despite the challenges, the strength of our whānau in seeking help does not go unnoticed by our staff, who, like Jo-Ann, are often taken aback by their commitment to improving their wellbeing. Rowan, DCM’s Kaiārahi Piki te Ora, comments that there can be a vicious cycle when it comes to the treatment of mental health issues for those who are rough sleeping. She comments that the under-resourcing of the mental health sector in Aotearoa can lead to whānau, “Being on the (mental health) ward for two weeks and then being discharged to the streets. If they are lucky, they will be placed under the TACT team, who come out to find them and give them an injection.” We find that whānau can often lose touch with their mental health team, resulting in them being placed back on the ward – only to end up on the streets again or in emergency accommodation and evicted if they suffer a relapse. DCM works in collaboration with Community Mental Health to change these outcomes for whānau. Community Mental Health regularly visits DCM helping people to access the support they need. Rowan shares that at times mental health staff support DCM when a mandatory treatment order is needed. There is a high risk of suicide in those who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness. We know – again, from experience – that receiving mental health support can save someone’s life and prevent tragedy. Wairua Māori believe the sneeze of life, the mauri, was breathed into the body to create humankind – and that everyone has a wairua, a living soul. Spiritual health is an important part of someone’s overall hauora, and though it is a broad concept, the practical nurturing of someone’s wairua can involve identifying what brings meaning to their life and finding their ‘why’, or purpose. DCM acknowledges that understanding the wairua of our whānau connects us better and can bring significant, positive impacts to the engagement we have with our people. One way that DCM nurtures wairua is through meaningful activities – such as our weekly poetry sessions. Led by John Howell, a retired Presbyterian minister who volunteers at DCM every Tuesday, whānau are given an opportunity to share their creative work and critique others – leading to meaningful conversations. John Howell (right) leads one of DCM’s poetry sessions. Pastor Joe Serevi (left) of the Salvation Army has also been supporting DCM and our people for many years. Here he joins in the fun. Our regular carving courses honour traditional Māori carving techniques. As well as connecting whānau to their culture, our staff also take part in these courses so they are able to on-share this taonga of knowledge. Bjay, one of our Toru Atu (Outreach) workers, shares her experience: “As a Māori woman, coming from a background where our women didn’t carve as part of our culture, getting permission from my elders was a must. This is to show respect for our beliefs, our traditions and our elders, past and present. Whatever the outcome may be, it must be respected. It was an honour to be permitted to carve. “The ability and experience to learn about the different wood types, strengths and colours was nothing short of amazing. What wood floats to make a waka, what wood they used to make taiaha (traditional weapon). Learning how to respect and use the tools was just as important. To carve something so precious out of a block of wood and shape it into something beautiful was uplifting and left me feeling proud. “When we do something so traditional, you can’t help but think of your old people who are or were carvers and weavers, and be honoured to be a part of their legacy. Whether the art is contemporary or not, the tikanga will always remain strong, and the tradition will always stay alive. “It makes you proud to be Māori.” Bjay (right) with Shylo at one of DCM’s carving sessions. As an organisation, we open and close our day with karakia and waiata, and whānau are invited to join. DCM staff are spread across the building and the city undertaking different mahi throughout the day. Beginning our day together is important as we ‘settle’ our wairua before opening our doors, and similarly to close our day as we go our separate ways. Just as music and waiata play an important role in the life of DCM – so does our karakia. Sia, DCM’s Kaiarataki Ringa Rehe (Practice Leader), shares that karakia is important to DCM because “Karakia is of value to whānau. Kotahitanga is established through all of us coming together as one to begin and end the day. And karakia is rewarding on a personal level for many of us. Having that as a part of our regular routine at DCM means that we connect meaningfully with one another beyond the level of what we can see.” DCM has been able to purchase four new guitars for use at waiata thanks to support from the Nikau Foundation. Taio Whānau can be left without a sense of place when they experience homelessness. When all of your time is spent looking for shelter or searching for food, a sense of belonging and safety is not attainable. At DCM we aim to foster an environment that welcomes whānau and helps them to feel as if they have a place where they belong. DCM sits on the historic site of Te Aro Pā and we honour this connection by offering the same services and supports the Pā provided in the 1800s. Te Aro Pā provided hospitality too, and at the changing of the seasons – like the peoples of this area used to do – we come together to celebrate Seasonal Kai. Recently, we gathered at Te Wharewaka o Pōneke to enjoy a hāngī thanks to funding by Wellington City Council’s Connected Communities Fund. Our Seasonal Kai for Matariki provided whānau with an opportunity to take part in an enjoyable event that has become a highlight of the year. Another tangible way DCM supports taio is through the housing procurement mahi we undertake with our Aro Mai Housing First service. Housing First is all about finding homes that are the right fit for our whānau. We assess their needs and aspirations for a whare where they will thrive. This includes the neighbourhood where they would like to live, access to amenities, number of bedrooms – everything that helps determine that the physical environment will have a positive impact on our people. Because everyone deserves to have a place that they can call home. Iwi Katoa Within the health sector, our whānau can sometimes find it hard to access the support they need. For whānau who are Māori, this is especially true with recent research showing that 96% of Māori experience racism on a daily basis. We want to change this for our people by supporting them through their interactions within the health and social services sector to make these positive and empowering experiences. Attitudes within the sector may have changed in recent years, but this does not discount the negative experiences our whānau may have had. Recently, we welcomed Kitty Truell on behalf of the Public Health Agency to DCM. She comes to Te Hāpai weekly to spend time with whānau, hearing their stories to better inform policy and strategy development within the Ministry of Health around equity of health services. Ministry of Social Development staff also come to DCM in person to run sessions twice a week where our people can seek assistance with the support of our staff. Accessing an MSD grant for an essential item such as glasses can be life-changing for our whānau who may have difficulties navigating the system. A hard fact of reality is that without access to appropriate medical care, people’s lives are at risk. DCM held a memorial service at Wesley Methodist Church recently for those who have passed away. Simon (left) lights candles in memory of the 17 DCM whānau who have passed away over the last two years while Sia (right) reads out their names. Unfortunately, DCM has seen the full impact of the poor health outcomes associated with homelessness in Aotearoa. Over the last two years, 17 of our whānau have passed away, one as young as 25 years old, with three men known to us who were victims of the Loafers Lodge tragedy. We all feel the impact of these losses and especially at this time of Matariki, we look back and remember the lives of those we have lost. But at Matariki, we also look to the future, and we are excited to see the opportunities that lie ahead to transform the lives of our whānau as we travel on our waka together – toward health and wellbeing. WORDS: MATTHEW MAWKES & MIRIAM HENDRY. Can you help? If you or someone you know would be interested in volunteering to provide hauora services through one of our existing programmes, or if you have an idea for a new one, please don’t hesitate to get in touch. And, as always, you can also help by telling all your friends and whānau about DCM and our important work in Wellington with those who need us most. Please forward this email on. Because together – with your help – we truly can end homelessness in our city. Support DCM Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
      • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM Wellington Mayor Tory Whanau joins DCM's Outreach team, checking in with people who are rough sleeping in the city communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Reaching out with the Mayor GUEST WRITER: LEE-ANNE DUNCAN DCM’s Toro Atu (Outreach) Team were delighted when Wellington Mayor, Tory Whanau, accompanied them as they checked on people sleeping rough on the city’s streets. She declared herself “an advocate” to see their heart, passion – and impact. “Kia ora, gidday, would you like to say hello to the Mayor?” says Rowan McCardle, introducing a man sitting in Te Aro Park to the Wellington Mayor, Tory Whanau. The man – who Rowan knows well from his visits to DCM – is keen to chat, almost flirtatious, from his spot in the bright afternoon sun. After a quick chat, Tory, Rowan, and her co-worker Clifton Raukawa, head down to Courtenay Place responding to a notification just through from the Wellington City Council. A woman has been rough sleeping outside a business on Courtenay Place, and while it’s sunny, it’s June, so it’s chilly. “She has only a thin blanket, and the person who notified the council about her is concerned,” says Clifton to Mayor Tory, reading off the email on his mobile phone. “We know this woman. She’s been away but must be back in town, so we will need to see how we can support her.” The WCC email notification is great timing as this is exactly what Rowan and Clifton, workers from DCM’s Toru Atu, or Outreach Team, want to show the mayor – how DCM responds when a member of the public calls the council to report concerns about someone sleeping rough. It’s a service the council helps fund. It’s also not great timing – the woman’s blankets are spread out in the lee of a post box, but she is nowhere to be seen. “It’s okay, I’ll circle back in a few hours. She won’t have gone far,” says Clifton. He’s troubled though. As the woman has been out of town for some time, she’s no longer eligible for emergency housing here and must start the process again. Clifton’s already thinking about how he can support her, ensuring she’s connected in with DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team. Tory and Mere – Photo by Damon Keen. Rowan, Clifton and the Mayor (and, yes, a couple of photographers and journalists) continue down Courtenay Place. Within a few steps, Rowan spots another familiar face. “Nanny! I haven’t seen you in ages! Kia ora!” It’s Mere, whose face is also familiar to Wellingtonians who spend time at this end of town. However, for some weeks her usual spot outside the St. James Theatre has been vacant as she’s been settled into a rest home. Rowan introduces the Mayor, and Tory and Mere sit down on a bench to discover their whanaunga – who they know in common. It doesn’t take long to find connections, to the evident delight of both. “DCM worked with Mere for a long time to get her into the rest home,” says Clifton. “We had to build a lot of trust with her, but she agreed to go and it’s clearly agreeing with her. She’s looking really good.” Nonetheless, here she is back on Courtenay Place? “Yeah, but that’s her social connection. Coming here to chat to people, to connect with her friends, that’s what she knows. But now we know she’s well housed and cared for, so that’s okay,” says Clifton. Some of the people street begging are housed, but having a house costs money. Benefit payments don’t go far, and often street beggars aren’t physically or mentally able to work. Being on the street supplements their income, but, also, like Mere, gives them the chance to meet up with their mates. Clifton has his own experience of homelessness. Living and working in Auckland, he was visiting Wellington when the COVID-19 lockdowns began. Suddenly, he was homeless and jobless. Luckily, he found a flyer for DCM, which found him housing, then offered him a job as a peer support worker, as DCM values lived experience. Clifton is now studying to bring theory into his practice. Like Rowan, he loves his Outreach work, as tricky as it is at first to bowl up to people who – quite honestly – might tell you to bugger off in no uncertain terms… Clifton - Photo by Juan Zarama Perini. A little further down Courtenay Place, the trio have a quick chat with Mark. With everyone they meet it’s a quick, “Kia ora, how are you, how’s it going?” Much of their work is making repeated connections, building trust, finding the right supports at the right time, even after someone is housed, like Mark. He was rough sleeping but now is permanently housed and being supported by DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) Team, as keeping house is tough when you’ve not had to do housework, be a good neighbour, or pay bills for quite some time. The Outreach Team were lucky with the weather the day they took Mayor Tory for an up-close look at their mahi. On the streets of the capital city, the days are not always so clement. Wellingtonians are generally compassionate people, they want to help, and the way many action that support is by handing over food, money, blankets, clothes. “But that’s short-term assistance, which actually makes their situation more long-term,” says DCM Director, Stephen Turnock. “It teaches people they can get money and food by street begging or rough sleeping. At DCM, we are about providing long-term change. So we say, if you want to buy kai or provide support to people on the street, then look at donating to DCM. You’re still helping by ensuring people who are trained to engage will work with that person long term to get more sustained outcomes than just that brief moment where you give someone some lunch.” DCM’s Outreach Team approach street beggars and rough sleepers with nothing more than a warm smile – and often, like Clifton, their own lived experience of homelessness. Every week day they’re out on Wellington’s streets, in all weather, stopping and chatting to people they already know by name, and, importantly, scanning for people they don’t know. If so, they will approach them, encourage them to come to DCM to access the many support services available at Lukes Lane, and get connected with social agencies, all in the one place. Social Issues reporter Hanna McCallum (left) wrote this great article about Outreach in The Post – Photo by Damon Keen. The other thing Wellingtonians can do, especially as winter grips tighter, is call the Wellington City Council on 04 499 4444 if they spot someone sleeping rough on the street, in the bush or in a car. After that call, a ‘ticket’ is created and emailed to the Outreach Team. The team receive at least two a day, but sometimes 10, usually numbering between 90 and 120 notifications a quarter. Sometimes notifications are for the same person, showing people are really concerned. After receiving the notification, the team races off to try to connect with the person, wherever they are across the Wellington region, whether out on the streets or tucked in the bush. “The team’s tagline is ‘Whatever it takes’,” Stephen says. “If they’re told to go away, they’ll respectfully keep checking back in, and usually the person will come into DCM. When they do, that’s a great win for the team. “For people experiencing homelessness, the value our team brings is showing them that someone in the community cares. For the wider city, our team is about recognising that the people we see rough sleeping are people. Yes, they might have some issues, and they come with a history, but they’re so much more than that. Our team brings that insight and knowledge to the wider public.” Walking out with the team has also brought insight to Tory Whanau. The Outreach Team has been walking the streets since 2016, with Wellington City Council providing funding for the team since 2019. Mayor Tory is more than reassured it’s money well spent, and she – like DCM – is perplexed no other council in Aotearoa New Zealand does anything similar. Her walk-out with the team has spurred her to urge other Mayors to follow suit. “Until you come out here and see what the team does, you don’t really see the value. I can see that clearly. Until all the systems are fixed – mental health, welfare, housing, which are all long-term issues – homelessness won’t go away. As a society, we need to have more compassion and see the human side of homelessness. If more of us know the people sleeping rough on our streets, we would be more compassionate and understanding. This city is also where they live.” Tory and Rowan – Photo by Damon Keen. Stephen is equally warm about the council’s support. “Everyone there is truly invested in the social wellbeing of our people. There’s a continued and genuine passion that’s shared about these vulnerable communities. That, I would say, is the primary reason the Outreach mahi exists and is so well supported here in Wellington.” The final stop on Mayor Tory’s tour is for Rowan to check in on a young woman in her early 20s, ‘living’ behind a piece of cardboard down an alleyway an arm’s length from Wellington’s home of high culture, the Michael Fowler Centre. Her behaviour – caused by a history of trauma, mental illness and drug addiction – has seen her evicted from emergency housing, which means she’s no longer eligible for it. So, if she’s not on the psychiatric ward, she must live on the street or with her abusive boyfriend. Usually, she prefers the street. Rowan walks up to the cardboard, calling the young woman’s name. After a few words, Rowan’s back. She wasn’t up for talking today, but Rowan knows they’ll likely see her tomorrow at DCM, at Te Hāpai, where people can come for a cuppa, a chat, and have any health, addiction, housing, benefit and money issues dealt with, and maybe collect some kai from the Foodbank. “She’s engaged with us and we have a rapport with her. If we don’t see her, someone from our team will look for her. We’ve got her working with Aro Mai Housing First, so hopefully we can find her a permanent home soon.” And from there, the Sustaining Tenancies team will step in, guiding this traumatised young woman to keep her home. Photo by Juan Zarama Perini. Back at DCM in Lukes Lane, Mayor Tory Whanau is vocal in her admiration of what she’s witnessed. And she’s hopeful more Wellingtonians will call the council if they see someone street begging or sleeping rough this winter, rather than handing over food, money, blankets, clothes. “It’s been great to be here and see the notification process in action, and then to see the heart Rowan and Clifton have when they approach people in response. That’s how they deserve to be treated. I was already a big supporter of DCM but being out here today has taken it to the next level. “Seeing what’s happening here, and meeting the people, hearing the stories, it brings it home to me even more. If more Wellingtonians could experience what the Outreach Team sees each day, they would have a greater understanding of homelessness, and how we must protect our most vulnerable.” Lee-Anne Duncan is a freelance writer and editor who has written many stories for DCM, such as ‘We count, we matter – and we vote’, the 2020 General Election at DCM, and ‘Right at Home’, the story of Arthur. Thank you Lee-Anne for hitting the streets with Tory and the DCM team. It’s getting cold out there As we have shown in this story, help is just a phone call away. If you spot someone sleeping rough on the street, in the bush or in a car, call Wellington City Council on 04 499 4444 and they will notify us. You can also help by telling all your friends and whānau about DCM and our important work in Wellington with those who need us most. Please forward this email on. Because together – with your help – we truly can end homelessness in our city. Support DCM Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCM PO Box 6133 Marion Sq Wellington, Wellington 6011 New Zealand Add us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

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} .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } This month we share DCM's new film clip, and hear the story of DCM's whaea Jenny, in her own words communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Te Rahi o DCM The Breadth of DCM  Kia ora koutou We are excited to show you our new film clip – Te Rahi o DCM – as we hear from our Manahautū Stephen, other members of the DCM team, and whānau like Hapi and Smurf, who share some of their story. You’ll see our carving group in action, and other cultural activities such as our daily waiata. Amidst the activities, you’ll see DCM’s Whaea Jenny, whose role as Toa is to support the development and implementation of DCM’s Te Ao Māori strategic approach. Whaea Jenny supports, mentors, and role models the organisation’s kaupapa Māori competency programme to strengthen our cultural capacity and capability. She is a champion of our kaupapa, and a true unsung hero of DCM. We are delighted to share her story – in her own words. <!-- --> Unsung heroes of DCM Whaea Jenny My name is Jenny Langford-James, but I was born as Jeanette Whetumarama, and grew up with this name – it is the name on my driver’s licence, for example. It wasn’t until I was an adult and went to get a passport in 1986 that I found out my father hadn’t registered me under this chosen name, but rather had recorded my middle name as May. Originally, I’m from Motueka. My iwi is Ngāti Kuia – that’s on my nana’s side. My koro is from Ngāti Apa. I am the third of eight siblings: Laura, Michael, Jenny, Stuart, Patrick, Peter, Shaun, Jerry. My older sister was brought up by my grandmother, so as the second oldest I had a big role in looking after everyone. Things weren’t very good growing up. We were very poor. We couldn’t afford to have our power on most of the time – and so we lived in the dark. For many years we had no shoes. I remember being sent around the neighbourhood with a note to ask for bread. But when we didn’t have kai we walked down to the beach – about half an hour’s walk from home – and lived off the sea. Mussels and cockles, cooked on a bonfire. The last thing on my mind was education, but I did go to school. We couldn’t afford books, so we cut big white drawing paper into little booklets and used that. A lot of stuff we were taught at school I learned through memory. Front left in this photo is our very own Whaea Jenny. I wasn’t allowed to speak te reo Māori as a child – I got a whack with a ruler on my first day of school for that. Mum and my aunties used to kōrero in te reo, but behind closed doors. In the end the reo started when we did our prayers, our karakia. That’s how we learned the language. I joined a Māori culture group and performed at a young age. It was a place where you could go away and express yourself. It was non-judgemental. And whatever you put in to it, you got out of it. To this day I love kapa haka. Our father was an alcoholic and a violent man. My mother, brothers and I all suffered beatings from him. But our mum made sure that we weren’t brought up outside a pub. She was our saviour really. She supported us all, and it is thanks to her that we have gone on to have the lives we’ve had. One day my parents got a visit from the government saying they were going to take us kids away. And so, I left school at 14 and a half to look after the two youngest ones while mum went to work. It is these experiences that give me empathy for our whānau – a real understanding of what they have experienced and what they are going through now. Manaakitangata was an everyday thing for us. Mum was strict about it – we had to uphold the mana of ourselves and of the family, and we learned to respect others’ beliefs too. We need to prepare our whānau for the next generation. From a Māori perspective, it’s about making sure someone else can step into your shoes. When my oldest brother died, one of the whānau from back home got up to speak and said, “Who’s going to look after us now?” My whānau – all of us – were the ones who looked after everyone in Motueka. So, when someone died, we were the ones who went in and supported the families, sat on the paepae, did the karanga – did all the work to look after everyone. And then it dawned on me – all of this manaakitangata was taught to us. Now I understand what it means. Today, it is great to work for an organisation like DCM, where manaakitanga is one of our core values. Whaea Jenny and her colleagues worked together with police to develop a new family violence kaupapa while she was employed in Taranaki. At the age of 40 I decided to enrol at Nelson Polytechnic where I studied for a Mental Health Support Workers Certificate. I was nervous as I’d had very little education growing up; however, thanks to my kaiako (teacher) and follow peers, I managed to graduate. I have worked in both the North and South Islands, with kaupapa Māori services and mental health services. I was with Gateway Housing Trust in Nelson, up in Auckland working for Te Whare Tiaki Trust, then in South Taranaki for 18 years working for Ngāti Ruanui Iwi Social Services, before joining Kahungunu Whānau Services in Wellington, in the same building where I work with DCM today. I first came to know about the mahi of DCM by beginning and ending our days alongside the team here in Lukes Lane, as we joined together for the morning waiata and karakia. I felt a calling that I just had to be with DCM. I wanted to work with the most marginalised whānau. So, after a hui with DCM Director Stephanie, and an interview with Taone and Neavin, I was employed by DCM. I began here in September 2019. Whaea Jenny lends her support at one of DCM's COVID vaccine clinics, November 2021. I love the whānau who come here to DCM. If we can give a bit of ourselves to them, we get so much back. I want to see them all housed, and for DCM to show them a different way forward. We’re getting them into homes, but we need more than just homes. For me in my role as Toa, I am working alongside our Practice Leader Sia to get DCM’s Tātai Aro practice framework in place. We are learning what mana-enhancing services are all about, and making sure that DCM is culturally viable, and that all of our staff have the capacity and capability to step up and make things work. Among our team, there is a wealth of knowledge, and everyone has their own tikanga, with so much to share. I am grateful to have this opportunity to share my knowledge too. I always go back to Stephanie, who made this job happen for me. Stephanie was DCM's director for 16 years, and she made the place rock. I am excited to be part of the team with Stephen at the helm, as we map our way forward, and can't wait to see what comes next for our amazing organisation, where manaakitanga sits at the heart of everything we do. Thank you Whaea Jenny for sharing the precious taonga that is your story with us. This story uses elements of Whaea Jenny's Kaimahi Kōrero with Michelle Scott. (Thanks Michelle!) <!-- --> Do you know someone who may like to join DCM? We currently have a Kaiarataki Piki te Kaha (Senior Manager) role, Kaimahi (Key Worker) roles as part of DCM's Piki te Ora Pou, along with Kaiāwhina (Peer Support Worker) roles available at DCM. Do you know someone who, like Jenny, could use their life experience to help support others on the journey to sustainable housing and wellbeing? All the info is available on our website. Please get in touch, and, as always, please forward this Ngā Kōrero on to anyone who may like to learn more about our mahi.   Support DCM <!-- --> <!-- --> Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

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line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } From a bus stop to a whare by the beach – Michelle’s story communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Kia atawhai – Be kind On the road with DCM's Aro Mai Housing First Hutt Team  DCM's Aro Mai Housing First Hutt Team led by Barrie (left), with Karen, Te Paki, Ashleigh, Cindel and Daniel, at the office in Kokiri, Seaview, Lower Hutt. (Not pictured: Luisa.) DCM is well-known for the work we do in Wellington, but did you know we have a team working in the Hutt? Since July 2020, our Hutt team have been part of the Tākiri Mai Te Ata Whānau Ora collective, providing services to people who are experiencing homelessness in the Hutt Valley.   Based at Kōkiri Marae, our Hutt team are part of the wider Aro Mai Housing First whānau, and they remind us of an old DCM saying, “We might be small. But we are working on some of the biggest problems facing our city.” Along with providing Housing First services, the Hutt Team do Outreach work, and collaborate with Wā Kainga to ensure the whānau they are working with remain housed, and that no one falls through the cracks.   In this month’s update, we are using the motto Kia atawhai (Be kind), and it is thanks to the kindness of the people of the Hutt Valley, and the hard mahi of our amazing Hutt Team, that we have been able to see people like Michelle thrive. <!-- --> From a bus stop to a whare by the beach – Michelle’s story It was just before the pandemic when Alex and Paula from DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team managed to meet with Michelle at a Lower Hutt café. Michelle presented as very tidy, and happy to sign a consent form so the DCM team could work to help get her housed. She listed her address as ‘Waterloo bus stop’. Michelle was very thin, and it was clear she had been roughing it for a long time.   The meeting came about due to the concern of the general public in the Hutt for Michelle’s wellbeing, which led to many calls to Hutt City Council for a response. Soon after the meeting, Michelle disappeared again, as her mental health challenges took hold once more.   Alex did not give up, searching for Michelle at some of her favourite hot spots, such as MIX, a service supporting those experiencing mental health distress, where Michelle could have a hot meal and charge her phone. Michelle was also a regular at the local library, where the staff knew her well. Michelle with her current key worker Daniel Patelesio. It takes a team to support the whānau we engage with, and others who have supported Michelle include Alex, Paula, Charloh, Kat, and Te Paki. Michelle was sighted sleeping in doorways and on a mattress a member of the public had given her. The public continued to make multiple notifications to the Hutt City Council. Everyone was worried about her wellbeing. When Alex finally found her again, Michelle did not remember her – she could not even recall that they had met.   This is a very familiar story for the DCM team. Mental health is an ongoing issue for many of the people we engage with, who often suffer from trauma and undiagnosed disorders.   Another familiar story is how the pandemic helped many of our whānau move into housing for the first time in a long time. This was true for Michelle too – because without any of the usual supports available to people out on the street, and with services such as libraries closed, emergency housing suddenly became a necessity.   DCM does not believe that emergency housing is a good solution for New Zealand’s housing crisis, and though it temporarily provided Michelle with a roof over her head, it was a struggle in many ways. Michelle became unwell and ended up in hospital, but by this time – mid-2020 – DCM had established a Housing First team in the Hutt Valley. While Michelle was in hospital, Vicki, an Emerge Aotearoa tenancy manager who works with DCM as part of the Aro Mai Housing First collaboration, found her a permanent whare. Michelle was delighted to be able to move in when she was discharged from hospital.   This is where the hard work really started – and it took time for DCM’s vision for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving – to become true for Michelle.   By moving people from homelessness into housing, then providing wrap-around support and regular home visits, we uphold people’s mana – and their right to an adequate standard of living as per the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. But sometimes, once people are housed, we start to understand what led to their homelessness in the first place. For Michelle, much of our support has been to address her health and wellbeing – other cornerstones of the Housing First concept. Michelle is now housed by the beach, which she loves. Her neighbourhood is great for walking, which she often does during the day to keep fit and healthy. Michelle also enjoys a close relationship with her mother and two daughters who now live nearby.   Michelle’s current key worker is Daniel, who visits regularly. Michelle says she is “Learning to trust people” again through her relationship with Daniel. She now sees how her life has changed in positive ways through her willingness to work with DCM. “I was homeless,” Michelle says, “There is no other way to describe it.”   Daniel has seen Michelle grow, and observed how she has turned her whare into a home. Everything is so well organised. The Housing First team will eventually ‘graduate’ Michelle, as she becomes more confident – and independent.   Meanwhile, the concern of the people of the Hutt Valley didn’t end when they stopped sighting Michelle out on the streets. A DCM staff member who worked with Michelle overheard concerned members of the public speaking about her one day, and was able to inform them that Michelle was now safe, and housed.   It is good to Kia atawhai (Be kind) to people who are rough sleeping or street begging wherever we may see them. But how proud we are to see Michelle go from the Waterloo bus stop, to her very own whare by the beach. WORDS: MIRIAM HENDRY / PHOTOS: SUPPLIED. <!-- --> What to do if you are concerned about someone rough sleeping or street begging You can make a difference! Don't give people money or food when you see them out on the streets. Acknowledge people and, if appropriate, direct them to DCM services. But better still – if you are concerned about someone rough sleeping or street begging, call Hutt City Council on 0800 488 824 or Wellington City Council on 04 499 4444 – and they will notify our team. Together – with your help – we truly can end homelessness in our city.   Support DCM <!-- --> <!-- --> Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } When we connect with our neighbours, good things happen communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact When we connect with our neighbours, good things happen Ka tūhonohono te hapori, ka puta ngā hua DCM has been taking part in Neighbours Aotearoa throughout the month of March. Neighbours Aotearoa is all about making connections in your neighbourhood. If we can be a resilient and supportive community, we can make longer-term and more deeply ingrained changes to the social fabric of Aotearoa. At DCM, we have often wondered how we can better take part in our neighbourhood. We work with the most marginalised people in our city. We are so focussed on ensuring our people are housed and supported to become good neighbours – but Neighbours Aotearoa made us ask, how can we as an organisation be good neighbours too? One thing DCM does very well is sing! And so, throughout March, we have been taking our daily karakia and waiata out into the middle of Te Aro Park, inviting everyone to join in. It has been a fantastic experience and we know that much like our location on Lukes Lane, the park also occupies the historic space of Te Aro Pā. It is right and appropriate that waiata should again be heard here. Ka mihi au kit e takiwā o Te Aro Pā. DCM's chess tournament in Te Aro Park. Cesar (top right, in wheelchair) was the winner on the day. A highlight of the month – and year – was a chess tournament held in Te Aro Park in collaboration with Wellington City Council. We had members of Police, Community Law, BGI (Wellington Boys & Girls Institute), Hāpai Ake (Local Hosts), Te Paapori, Barkers Clothing, students from Te Auaha Barbering Academy, and members of the public who happened to be walking past, join in the fun. But it was DCM whānau who scored the most wins, with Cesar at the top of the leader board with 10 wins in total. Nice job, Cesar. DCM kaiāwhina Fabian shares his thoughts about the day: DCM's kaiāwhina Fabian was nervous getting on camera, but here shares his thoughts on Neighbours Aotearoa and playing chess in Te Aro Park with the DCM crew and our neighbours. <!-- --> On the road with the Noho Pai team This month we share the story of DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) team. The Noho Pai team work tirelessly to support whānau to sustain their tenancies, to be good neighbours, and to thrive in their communities. Their focus is on ensuring positive outcomes for vulnerably-housed whānau – and sometimes it is very demanding and time-consuming mahi. The team is also there to pick up the pieces when things fall apart. When DCM says we work with marginalised people, this is what it truly looks like. The Noho Pai team have some of the most vulnerable members of our entire community on their books. As a result, we have opted to change the names of the people featured in this story, and we will not share any photos from inside their homes. Delena’s first stop of the day is a tall concrete building owned by Kāinga Ora (formerly Housing New Zealand). A security guard lets her in the front door, where she will visit the small, ransacked flat of someone who will not be home – Marie – because she is in prison. Delena’s task today is to save as much of Marie’s stuff as she can, especially items that are meaningful to her. Kāinga Ora has agreed to store some of Marie’s stuff, but the rest will be dumped. Patsy is a Kāinga Ora tenancy manager and good friend of DCM’s. She lets Delena into the small one-bedroom flat. The place is a shambles, with items strewn everywhere, and graffiti on the walls. The kitchen is a no-go zone. Delena explains that this isn’t entirely Marie’s doing – other people have made themselves at home, causing a lot of collateral damage. Like many of the whānau DCM works with, Marie is extremely vulnerable. She has experienced severe trauma, and lives with a chronic condition that makes socialising with others a challenge. This also makes living in a small, noisy apartment, among many other vulnerable people, a problem for people like Marie. But Marie will not be able to come back to this flat – as Kāinga Ora will not allow people to return. Like many buildings in Wellington, it needs multi-million-dollar upgrades. When Marie finally comes out of prison, all she will be left with are the items Delena can save. Marie is very proud of her clothes, and so Delena focusses on saving the items she can recognise. She puts post-its on other small items, and ensures Patsy knows that Marie will want to keep the peach couch. Marie was very proud of her couch – it will mean a lot for her to see it on the other side. Patsy from Kāinga Ora (left) with Delena. On the top floor of the complex, a number of people are taking part in a weekly café-style lunch. This is a chance for tenants to connect with one another while enjoying coffee and home-baked kai provided by one of the local faith communities. Numerous people known to DCM have come from other complexes to join in the occasion. Ava makes her way around the café with ease. She stops to talk with Douglas – whose story we shared in 2021 – in the rooftop courtyard that overlooks the city. The café is a great opportunity to catch up with people DCM hasn’t seen in a while. Ava also catches up with Patsy from Kāinga Ora about one of her whānau who was not at their flat today, with whom she wants to have a catch-up kōrero. Ava finds her relationship with Patsy essential to her work. When one of Ava’s whānau moved to another property due to circumstances outside their control – without Ava’s knowledge – it was Patsy who helped her reconnect with them at their new address. Also at the café today is Elaine, who is 67 years old and housed at another location. Elaine’s new flat sits by itself and Elaine misses the social connections she was able to make at this complex. It is good to see Elaine, as when she is unwell she will completely disconnect from services. Like a keel, the Noho Pai team know that they can use their friendship with her to help right things again. Elaine loves jigsaw puzzles, and Ava says that she has picked up some new ones for her. The Noho Pai team will pop around to visit her in her whare tomorrow, and while there will check that she is doing well inside her still-new four walls. Douglas with Ava. Across town, Moses arrives at Fred’s place. Fred suffers from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. Wellington City Council want to re-carpet Fred’s whare, but he doesn’t trust them, and tradespeople refuse to enter the property due to the state it is in. As a result, Fred doesn’t like letting people into his home – but he opens the door to Moses. Fred seems comfortable with Moses, who is here to try to get him on to the correct benefit. They travel to Fred’s health centre as Fred needs a medical certificate. While there, Moses advises Fred to pick up a payment card from MSD so he can buy a phone and keep in contact with Moses and other important people in his life. These are positive outcomes for Fred today. Moses will broach the subject of Fred’s carpet soon – which will help raise his overall quality of life. Moses. At court, Tipene is stopped by security who ask him to put his possessions in a plastic container, which goes through a scanner. On the second floor, Tipene enters courtroom number 2, waiting for one of the 15 people on his caseload – Dean – to arrive. Dean has been having a tough time since the lockdowns, when his drinking started up after years of sobriety. He is facing charges for an incident involving some friends he has been having a hard time distancing himself from. Dean arrives, and the mood in the room is tense, with the gallery full of others waiting for their turn to be called to the stand. Dean is called, and it is humiliating for him to have to get up in front of so many strangers. The judge speaks first, and then the conversation moves from lawyer to lawyer, and finally to Dean. A date is set for the next stage in the case and Tipene takes Dean aside for a quick kōrero. Dean is relieved to have the support of a familiar face at these proceedings. This is a still from a story about Wellington's Special Circumstances Court, which you can watch on our YouTube page. Delena visits the whare of another person on her caseload – Sarah. Sarah is housed in a Kāinga Ora property, but it’s a standalone house, which Delena explains is a more appropriate fit for Sarah, who didn’t do very well in a housing complex. The lawn is overgrown but Sarah doesn’t have any gardening tools – something the team will get to when they can. Today it’s all about a phone – as Sarah’s phone is not able to make or receive calls. The whare is in a very quiet and isolated spot, and because Sarah also has schizophrenia, it’s important that she can be contactable, but also call for outside help too. Sarah freely talks about being “Under the Mental Health Act”. She sees this as a positive, as when she has an episode, or when things become a bit too much, she knows that she can go into respite care for a time. Delena explains that Sarah’s level of support at the moment is about practicalities such as a working phone. Another need at the moment is a bed. Sarah says she gets $300 a week, but Delena thinks she can access a special grant to get a bed, as sleeping on the floor isn’t ideal. Sarah says she has made a pasta meal, which Delena is delighted to hear. People have different levels of skill, and for whānau like Sarah, it’s sometimes a “two-step process”. In Sarah’s case, that’s successfully boiling the pasta, and adding some pasta sauce. There’s no cheese, but then that would be one step too far – for now. The Noho Pai team - Moses, Kesia, Ava, Penny, team leader Robert and Tipene. (Delena not pictured). Ava makes her way to the outer suburbs of Wellington to visit Hector. Ava has been working with Hector for some time. They see each other every week, and have built up a trusting relationship. When DCM first met Hector, he was sleeping in his car. He is now housed in a Kāinga Ora complex. Hector lives in a barren, windswept location, in dull, grey buildings that house many other vulnerable people. But inside Hector’s whare it’s a different story. Artworks adorn the walls and a coat that Hector is making for himself from unused curtains lies on the floor, a current work in progress. Hector has a Master of Fine Arts and his accomplished creativity is visible throughout his whare. Ava talks with Hector like an old friend, and the conversation flows across topics ranging from religion to kebabs. Hector wants to visit a local community centre, and so Ava drives him over to a bright, vibrant building that stands in stark contrast to the Kāinga Ora complex. Ava asks Hector to give her a call later about a food parcel, and Hector goes to see what’s happening at the centre today. On the road with Tipene (Stephen). Tipene goes to visit one of the most challenging people on his caseload – Trevor. Trevor is no longer able to access his property due to hoarding, and so now sleeps outside. Trevor has made his own campsite from scavenged materials, painted in bright colours. In Trevor’s mind, he had no choice but to build this fortress, with no other housing options available for him – just bureaucratic dead ends. Tipene calls out a greeting, and Trevor answers. They have a kōrero about Trevor’s situation. Trevor is understandably struggling at the moment and feels disenfranchised by the way others within the social sector treat him, particularly mental health services. Tipene often finds himself acting as an advocate for Trevor so that his mana is upheld, as at times he is known to walk out of meetings. Everyone wants the same outcome for Trevor – for him to be sustainably housed, connected, valued and thriving – but right now this seems far away. There are discarded tins of food around the campsite, and Tipene asks Trevor if he needs a food parcel with easy-tear tabs. Trevor says he is OK for now, and Tipene says that he will catch up with him soon. It is hard to leave Trevor behind on what has turned into a cold, wet afternoon. <!-- --> These are just a handful of stories from DCM’s Noho Pai team. How challenging it can be to stay housed after you have spent years living rough. Maybe you’re dealing with unaddressed mental health issues such as hoarding. Maybe you have an addiction. Maybe you were never taught how to do housework, or to cook. Maybe your mates need somewhere to stay, but their behaviour disrupts other tenants. When our whānau are dealing with these daily frustrations, housed among other vulnerable people while living on low incomes during a cost of living crisis, it might seem easier to go back to life on the street. The work of the Noho Pai team is challenging. But Ava, Moses, Tipene, Delena, Kesia, Penny, and team leader Robert don’t give up on anyone. They lift up the mana of our people, achieving positive outcomes for all – one step at a time. Ngā manaakitanga, Noho Pai team! WORDS / PHOTOS: MATTHEW MAWKES & MIRIAM HENDRY. Later in the year we will share the stories of DCM’s other amazing teams. In the meantime, thank you for your support of DCM – please do forward this Ngā Kōrero on to anyone you think may be interested in learning more about our mahi, and you’ll find other ways to support us by clicking the button below.   Support DCM <!-- --> <!-- --> Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. 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    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
      • 96 Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Throwing in the patch for a life growing larger with Keri, and Census week at DCM communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Life growing larger – Keri’s story Keri has a large number 13 tattooed across his right cheek. It’s unmissable – but it’s slowly starting to fade as Keri undergoes laser tattoo removal. “It’s been a bit of a process,” Keri reflects. “I’ve done six or seven sessions now. Got three or four to go – do them every six weeks. “It fuckin’ hurt getting it put on – but getting it taken off! Yeah, it’s not really getting easier…” Keri is working with DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team, and his key worker Riley has been accompanying him when he goes in for tattoo removal procedures. Keri has been judged harshly for his tattoo, with many people and organisations unwilling to engage with him. He explains why this might be. “Number 13 is Mongrel Mob. We do all of our patchings on the 13th.” But Keri threw in his patch six years ago – and he hasn’t looked back since. Keri and Riley. Photo by Mary Hutchinson. Keri was born in Hamilton, and along with his brother was adopted out. He describes family life as up and down – but not too bad. “I grew up with a Māori father and a blue-eyed, blonde-haired Pākehā mother, so you’ve got the best of both sides!” The family ended up moving to Rotorua, where Keri’s father worked as a school principal. Despite his father’s job, Keri describes school as “shitty”. “I just hated school – only went for the bone carving. But that was only an hour a week.” Keri started hanging out downtown, where at around 12 or 13 years of age he began to engage with the Mongrel Mob. For Keri, it was like gaining another family. “Gang life was good. Just like having brothers,” he says, while adding, “The young ones have burnt a lot of bridges over the years.” It is those in-between years that Keri doesn’t like to talk about much. He is too focussed on the future to dwell on the past. In the past there was prison, violence, and injuries. Keri wanted change – which led him to Te Aro Health Centre. Photo by Mary Hutchinson. Te Aro Health shares DCM’s kaupapa in every way. People are not talked down to, or judged, when they visit Te Aro Health. Instead they are welcomed, and experience respect. For Keri, this was a game-changer, and led to a phone call to Regina for help with housing. Regina was Keri’s first key worker at DCM, and they quickly found they had a close connection. “I was couch surfing with my sister in Strathmore,” Keri explains. “Straight across from me lived Regina. I used to go diving with her husband! When I went to DCM I finally met her – then I clicked!” Regina sorted out some emergency housing for Keri. Despite the dire state of emergency housing in Aotearoa, for Keri, the stability that comes with having a roof over your head meant everything. From there Keri rapidly went from strength to strength, and he now has his own whare thanks to the Aro Mai Housing First collaboration, which involves moving people from homelessness into housing then providing wraparound support and regular home visits to ensure people can sustain their tenancy. “Keri’s super self-sufficient in a lot of ways,” Riley shares. “Because he is really well connected and supported in his community – and with his whānau as well. So he will ask mates for help when needed – or they’ll offer – which is awesome. “Our help has mostly been with finances, kai, stuff like that – and connections to services. Assistance with filling out forms and explaining information.” Former key worker Regina was blown away to learn of Keri’s progress. “We can always offer support – anyone can do that – but it’s whether or not the individual chooses to take hold of that support. And it takes a lot of humility – especially, I know, for a man of Keri’s background – to be able to come to that place where he knows that he needs to accept it.” Keri is connecting with his community, with his kids – and he’s even got to know the landlord. In the future, he wants to start carving again, in his own whare. “Life has got a hell of a lot better – especially since I met you guys,” Keri says. “Everyone at DCM has treated me well.” Riley has now moved into full-time study, and so Keri will work with a new DCM key worker, Raya, who will continue to accompany him for his tattoo removal procedures. Keri filled out the 2023 Census with Raya’s help. This was his first time doing the Census, and after Raya explained how important it is to be counted, Keri found it comfortable and easy to complete. Riley shares, “Keri has always been the same guy. Always charismatic and confident, and able, but watching him settle into being housed again, so he can have the confidence to have his kids over, has been awesome. I’ve seen him blossom and flourish in slow but steady ways. “Life for Keri is growing larger – bit by bit.” WORDS: MATTHEW MAWKES / PHOTOS: MARY HUTCHINSON / DCM. <!-- --> Tatau tātou – all of us count Census week at DCM The Census allows us to reflect on who we are as a country. We are each a thread of the interwoven fabric that makes up the rich tapestry of Aotearoa. The whānau we work with here at DCM – those experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness – are an important part of that tapestry. We know that they have a lot to give, but that outcomes in health and housing aren’t always the greatest for them. And so we wanted to ensure they were counted in this year’s Census – just as we did in 2018 – because tatau tātou, all of us count. Benna Seveali'i-Siolo and Graham Streatfield from Stats NZ. Stats NZ joined us at DCM for the week of 20-24 February, during which 70 whānau were assisted to fill out the Census, either in private rooms or in the courtyard, on paper or using a tablet with a Stats worker supporting them throughout the process. We know that without support these whānau may never have had the chance to take part, and it is thanks to the wairua of the Stats NZ workers that our whānau were both comfortable and empowered to fill out the Census. A member of the Stats team commented that it was important to make sure “This community is not forgotten”. When asked how they felt about their time at DCM interacting with our whānau, another Stats worker commented that the conversations they had here were “Amazing and worthwhile” – a real highlight of the experience as a whole, and something that they had not experienced anywhere else. Whānau even shared some of their life stories with the Stats team while they filled out the Census – a special moment of whanaungatanga between the team and whānau and an “Interesting and fulfilling experience”. Many whānau filled out the Census in DCM's courtyard. Here Lua assists Monty to complete the Census on a tablet. Whānau recognised the importance of taking part in the Census. They strongly wanted their “Voices to be heard” and felt “Our word counts”. Being able to fill out the Census in a safe environment with familiar staff and access to the usual services running at DCM was important in making the Census a positive experience. Goodie bags and kai helped too! Some whānau were harder to reach than others, but overall they saw the Census as an opportunity to contribute directly toward government feedback and initiatives. Whānau found the Census to be “Simple and non-invasive” and “A positive experience”. For some, taking part in the Census was an act of service to others, as collecting information “Is important for people in the same situation as me” and for “People who have been on the benefit for a long time”. This was because information from the Census plays a large part in “Deciding where the money goes”. During the week we were delighted to see some of our deaf community assisted to take part in the Census, both with the help of DCM staff with sign language skills, and the Stats team themselves. We were continually surprised to see other whānau with a great mistrust of government take part as well. Graham assists Smurf to fill out the Census. One such person was Smurf, who experienced trauma at an early age at the hands of the Cyprus government. Through his relationship with DCM, built upon layers of trust and mutual respect, he was able to see the benefit in filling out the Census and found it to be a positive experience, this being the first time he had ever done it. Smurf found it “A lot easier than I first thought – I thought it would be more personal than it was”. Graham helped support Smurf to fill out the Census, sharing parts of his life story and reassuring him of the confidentiality of the information shared. Smurf’s is just one of 70 such stories shared during DCM’s Census week, and we thank Stats NZ for lifting up the mana of our people. Cyclone Gabrielle has had a big impact on this year’s Census, and we know the Stats team have been under a lot of pressure. We also lift up our whānau for having the courage to take part. Their stories are taonga, and the data they have provided will help build a better Aotearoa where everyone has the chance to be housed, connected, valued, and thriving. WORDS: MIRIAM HENDRY / PHOTOS: SUPPLIED. <!-- --> Foodbank SOS! DCM's Foodbank is empty! Meda and Jason have never seen our shelves so bare, and those that do have items are at a critical level – even the baked beans! New Zealanders have been finding their supermarket shop a painful experience for some time now. It is even more painful for the people we are working with here at DCM, who often have limited incomes. With three months to go until the next DCM Foodbank Appeal, we urgently need assistance. If you can help, donated food items are welcome at DCM week days, or to our food donation bin at New World Chaffers anytime. Some people also choose to support DCM with financial assistance at the end of the tax year, and you can find ways to do that below. Finally, if you have enjoyed this Ngā Kōrero, please forward it on to anyone who may be interested in supporting our mahi.   Support DCM <!-- --> Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • The unsung heroes of DCM
      • 96 The unsung heroes of DCM p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Solving problems with Fahimeh communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact 2023 – a year of challenges and opportunities Kia ora koutou We hope you have had a great start to your year. Here at DCM, there isn’t a closing down time, as we continue to support the most marginalised and vulnerable members of our community throughout the Christmas and New Year period. You may have seen other social services in the news talking about how they are finding that people are harder off than ever before. We’re finding this too at DCM. While milestones are being met, we know that the housing crisis is not over yet, and the people we meet here at DCM continue to be among the most economically-impacted members of our community. Fortunately, our incredible team – DCM’s hard-working kaimahi – makes sure that our whānau are not left on the bottom rung of the housing ladder. While our people may face significant challenges amidst the cost of living crisis, our team ensures they have access to the supports they need to thrive. We have two significant opportunities this year to ensure our whānau also have a voice on the national stage – the March census and October general election. We will do everything we can to make these opportunities accessible for our people, including having a polling booth right here at DCM, just as we did in 2020 when over 100 whānau voted, many for the very first time. We hope you will also ensure your voice is heard at the general election, so that the progress that has been made to tackle homelessness in Aotearoa is maintained. Behind our team are the many unsung heroes of DCM. In this update we share the story of Fahimeh, who has been collaborating with DCM to build our capability, so that we can continue doing what we do – but do it even better. Perhaps her story might spark some ideas about how you too can support DCM in 2023? Stephen Turnock  Manahautū DCM Manahautū Stephen (centre) leads karakia and waiata in Te Aro Park. DCM is taking part in Neighbours Aotearoa and will be leading waiata in the park every Monday and Friday at 9am for the next few months. If you're in the neighbourhood, join us! <!-- --> Unsung heroes of DCM Solving problems with Fahimeh Fahimeh McGregor loves to solve problems. And she certainly has the skills to do so – with a doctorate in the adoption of IT for performance and productivity improvement from AUT (Auckland University of Technology), she has 19 publications and 42 citations to her original family name, which is Zaeri. Fahimeh was born in Iran in the strategic town of Bandarabbas, on the Persian Gulf. Fahimeh was the youngest of seven siblings, and describes her early family life as very difficult. “I’m a revolution baby. The Iran Revolution happened in 1978 and was followed by a war between Iran and Iraq, which makes me part of the war generation as well. This took place during my primary schooling, and as my city is located in the south, close to the border – a port on the Gulf – it had a huge impact.” There was a lot of trauma for Fahimeh and her family. She describes nights without power, with all access to utilities cut for hours, while having to do her homework next to a little oil lamp. “Years later, I realised that I never had any wishes as a child. We had family wishes, which were to make sure that in the morning all of us would get to have another day together. There was no certainty, or an understanding of what a stable life is. Here in New Zealand, people have got a very natural stability – unless, perhaps, they are experiencing hardship and homelessness.” Fahimeh at five years old - the only photo from her childhood. Fahimeh’s big inspiration was her father. He was highly educated for his time, leaving his farming background to do a diploma in literacy and accounting. As Bandarabbas is such a significant port city, the Iran government feared it could be lost, and though 90% of trade came through the port, profits only went to the capital, Tehran. Fahimeh’s father tried to protect the rights of his community. “But after the revolution, he came under a lot of pressure,” Fahimeh reflects. “He had to give up everything. The only memory I have from when I was two years old was the night we had to burn his books. That picture is still in my head. I am always asking myself, ‘Why? What’s wrong with his books?’” Fahimeh’s father died from a heart attack at a young age, but he continued to inspire her. “He loved his community. He believed in change. That’s why when I got my first job, I put my community's rights at the top of my list.” Fahimeh went to university in Iran, where she met many people appointed to their first position by her father. She started volunteering – always a passion of Fahimeh’s – and later got a job working for the Ministry of Housing and Urban Design, where she worked hard to introduce transparency within a corrupt system. “I was quite hot-headed. I was young and thought I could change everything. I did my best, whatever I could, but my mum realised it wasn’t a safe environment for me. She tapped me on the shoulder one day and said, ‘You need to leave this country’.” Realising she wouldn't be safe any longer, Fahimeh left Iran. She moved to Malaysia in 2010, where she continued studying toward her Master's Degree. This was supposed to take two years, but Fahimeh finished her Master's in 14 months. Despite not knowing anyone, Fahimeh’s next destination was New Zealand, where in 2013 she picked up her studies at AUT thanks to a scholarship. With a doctorate added to her name, Fahimeh soon turned her attention to giving back. “I want to be utilised for the community. That’s the most important thing for me. I want to make sure that wherever there are challenges, I can help people and organisations.” Fahimeh started her industry experience by applying her research in a large infrastructure project, Waterview Well-Connected Alliance. She was then offered an innovative leadership role by Fletcher Building, to lead a continuous improvement culture in the New Zealand International Convention Centre (NZICC) project. Always wanting to create her own consulting business, Fahimeh later formed a company called DELTA Informed Decisions, which brought her to DCM. Fahimeh met with DCM Manahautū Stephen, to collaborate on solving the challenges of DCM’s processes and systems. “I had regular meetings with Stephen,” Fahimeh says. “I needed to hear what he is passionate about. He is a very driven person and wants to deliver quality outcomes that drive improvement.” Fahimeh with DCM's Kaiarataki Kāhui. From there, Fahimeh met with DCM’s Kaiarataki Kāhui (leadership group), guiding them through a collaborative process to identify how DCM can best work towards its strategic goals. While Fahimeh has the knowledge and expertise, it was the leadership team that needed to ensure everything was moving in the right direction, to allow DCM to engage in a meaningful way with whānau and other stakeholders. Fahimeh also spent time with many other kaimahi. “First is people. I listen to the language, and pick up different lenses people have got. Everyone is like a big ocean to me. There’s so much you can discover to help shape a better practice model.” With DCM’s new organisational model and strategic goals implemented, it was time to look at some technology solutions to help pull this 53-year-old social service into the modern world. One of Fahimeh’s first projects was tackling DCM’s long-time Money Management Service. Fahimeh started with a diagnostic phase, analysing the efficiency of the processes to gain an understanding of where opportunities for improvement may lie. While DCM’s kaimahi may not have known it, all of Fahimeh’s tools are science-based. “Everyone downloads their knowledge to the table,” Fahimeh says. “People around the table will often say, ‘Oh! I thought it was this way, not that way?’ And it can be frustrating in a way, because I have to ask a lot of questions!” Another project Fahimeh has undertaken is the adoption of an entirely new database system for DCM – Exess. While it may not sound very exciting, DCM is completely reliant on data and evidence to gain insights into the whānau they are working with, and trends that are happening with homelessness in Wellington. For example, did you know that DCM engaged with 1,085 whānau last year, of whom 647 experienced homelessness, and 230 went without shelter altogether at some point during the year? Or that 71.6% of all DCM whānau are male, and that 52.8% are Māori? Importantly, it is this kind of data that DCM needs to report back to the powers-that-be. Exess is now in its testing phase, and DCM looks forward to the massive improvements this information management system will achieve for the organisation, especially with its whānau-centric outcomes model. Fahimeh has enjoyed her time at DCM, which is why she has given back by donating her valuable time in-kind. “DCM has its challenges, but this has been the most enjoyable and rewarding project I’ve done,” Fahimeh shares. “You guys have got a passion for people. I can feel your heart beating for your whānau. That’s quite fascinating to me – everything is about them. Businesses often say they are customer-centric, but it’s not as tangible as you experience at DCM.” Fahimeh and Stephen. Fahimeh is saddened by the current situation in Iran. She recently went to Turkey to help two of her nieces escape the country. Both are now safely in Istanbul – one registered at high school, and the other at university, continuing the family’s passion for education. “It’s another revolutionary time in Iran. It’s really sad to see what is happening. What I always say is that I wish for peace in the world. And not just for the Iranian people – everyone deserves a peaceful life. And that is true for the whānau DCM is supporting too. Living outside, sleeping out, is so damaging for your health. I hope that the tools DCM now has will help your kaimahi achieve amazing results for them.” <!-- --> Can you help? There are many ways that you can be part of our work here at DCM. One way is – like Fahimeh – through offering your professional expertise. Volunteer dentist Shennae (left) with dental assistant Ella (right) at a session at DCM in January. Oral health care is one of the most significant unmet needs of the people DCM works with. We are looking forward to celebrating the 7th anniversary of DCM's emergency dental service in March 2023 – read about our 5th anniversary here. But we haven't been able to do as many dental sessions as we'd like since the pandemic arrived. Are you a dentist, or do you know a dentist who may like to do a session with us? If you can help, or if you know someone who can, please get in touch.   Support DCM <!-- --> Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2023 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest Stories from DCM
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} .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Supporting the most marginalised this Christmas communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Supporting the most marginalised this Christmas We have almost made it through another challenging year at DCM. I am proud of the way our team has delivered our vision – for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving – regardless of everything the ongoing pandemic has thrown at us. I am also proud of the courage displayed by the people we work with. They come to DCM because they genuinely feel welcome here, and because the practical mahi we do makes a huge difference in their lives. But it is when whānau are housed that true transformation takes place. This is why DCM has always believed in ‘Housing First’ – dramatically improved wellbeing comes from having a permanent roof over your head. You shouldn’t have to earn a home – you have a human right to have one. At DCM, it all starts at Te Hāpai, our hauora-focussed, week day services at 2 Lukes Lane. Read on for the story of just one day at Te Hāpai, where the most marginalised and vulnerable people in our city come. Stephen <!-- --> Another day in the life of Te Hāpai Te Hāpai – which means “to lift up” – is a safe, welcoming place where people who are rough sleeping in Wellington are supported on a journey to housing and wellbeing. DCM began Te Hāpai in 2015 amid growing concerns from the community when a number of Wellington drop-in services closed. But nobody just ‘drops in’ to DCM – our hope is that everyone who walks through our door is lifted up, so they can then engage with the services available at Te Hāpai every week day. These services have a hauora-focus – by providing a safe and supportive environment, we build relationships to encourage people to take the steps needed to be well, and to thrive. Tea, coffee and kai helps, and Tanoa has carefully set up everything for the day. Our team know that kai is a great way to build connections with people. It can be easier to have a chat about someone’s housing needs over a cuppa, especially on a cold Wellington day. DCM’s on-site team gather at 8:45am for a briefing. Rowan is our team leader today, and talks us through what’s happening. We have a carving course upstairs, some manuhiri visiting, and Jo from MSD will also join us, to work through any issues people may have, from getting on a benefit or on the housing waitlist, through to accessing a special needs grant. There are a couple of whānau the team are looking out for today, including someone Rowan and Jenny need to catch up with. Everyone is welcome at Te Hāpai, even if they are excluded from other services. We employ a ‘high tolerance, low threshold’ approach. If someone is having a bad day, they are still welcome to come back on another day. Accessibility and inclusivity are important parts of DCM’s kaupapa. At 9am, Clifton, who is taking part in the carving course, calls us to waiata with one of the instruments the team has created. We know that these sounds were once heard frequently around our building on Lukes Lane, which sits on the site of the historic Te Aro Pā. The entire DCM team gathers outside for waiata. Whaea Jenny, DCM’s Toa, leads the gathering crowd, letting us know what is happening at Te Hāpai today. Jenny reminds everyone to treat each other with respect – “Remember – manaakitanga, whānau!” “Kia ora, nan.” At the door, everyone’s name is recorded. Kaimahi ask how everyone is feeling; if anyone says they’re unwell, we will chat to them out in the courtyard. COVID is still a feature in Aotearoa, and DCM takes extra precautions. For example, if someone would like to see one of the Te Aro Health nurses, they will need to mask up. At the welcome desk, things quickly get busy. A man walks up – “I need to talk to someone about my housing.” Kaimahi take him to a private space to talk through the issues he is facing. Someone else says he has a toothache and needs to see the dentist. DCM has its own emergency dental service, but because it relies on the expertise of volunteer dentists, is only available once or twice a week. He is booked in to come back for treatment on another day. Others are here today for kai, but especially for kōrero. Carl likes to make and share his own crosswords, but today he shares an anagram – ‘DUMP OLD RANT’. Carl says the words are a hint at who this political figure may be. Te Hāpai is a place where DCM’s teams can both refer, and – helpfully – find people. DCM’s Toru Atu (Outreach) team connects with people who are rough sleeping and street begging wherever they may happen to be. They often send people down to Te Hāpai, where members of their team provide familiar faces. Kai helps as a drawcard, as does the free internet, and all the practical programmes DCM provides. Need ID? A bank account? Food parcel? Housing? Nurse, audiologist, dentist? You’ve come to the right place! DCM does it all, and does whatever it takes, to connect whānau to the supports they need. Other DCM teams pop by Te Hāpai to find whānau. Aro Mai Housing First kaimahi catch up with people here, especially if they need to access one of the many on-site health services. Today Johnny has dropped in, and Jenny gives his key worker Penny a call to come by and see him. Penny works with DCM’s Noho Pai (Sustaining Tenancies) team, supporting newly housed and vulnerable tenants within their own communities. Penny encourages some of these whānau to come to Te Hāpai on a Monday or Friday when Te Awatea – which means “the awakening of the dawn” – is running. Te Awatea is a group that aims to reduce the harm associated with substance abuse. People are welcome to come and go from the meeting, but 1-1 counselling is also available when people are ready to take the next step and talk to one of DCM’s expert AOD practitioners. DCM also receives visitors from many other agencies and services. Often nurses from TACT (Team for Assertive Community Treatment) come by, looking for whānau in need of their monthly depot – slow-release medication to help treat people for mental illnesses. Just as we have with MSD today, DCM will make a private room available for the TACT Team. Accessibility is what it’s all about at Te Hāpai, but perhaps most important is inclusivity. No one is judged here – and everyone is made to feel welcome. DCM takes this inclusivity to the next level by employing people who have been homeless themselves – their commitment to doing what it takes to become well and then go on to support others on a journey to housing and wellbeing is inspiring. Our day is winding down at Te Hāpai, and participants in the carving course are ready for some lunch. Like many of the endeavours we undertake at Te Hāpai, this mahi is only possible thanks to donations from the people of Wellington. One example is the St. John’s in the City Outreach Committee who funded our carving course, providing access to culture that is often absent for the whānau DCM works with. We have enjoyed seeing the participants in the carving course thrive – having grown in confidence, they will now go on to share their knowledge with others. Carving course at DCM: Sam from Wānanga Taonga Puoro ki Pōneke led us with his beautiful and gentle way of teaching, while we grew in confidence sharing this experience together. Outside in the courtyard Matt bumps into Piripi, who is currently rough sleeping. “What do you think of Te Hāpai – do you feel lifted up when you come here?” Piripi gets straight to the point: “DCM is awesome – you’re always there when we need you. It’s a place where everyone can come, because everyone is welcome. There are people out there who are kind of stuck, but your staff never give up on anyone.” For DCM’s kaimahi, it’s never just another day at the office. Our vision is for communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued, and thriving. We feel privileged to see this vision become a reality each and every day at the very special place that is Te Hāpai. <!-- --> We need your help more than ever We are worried about our whānau in the face of the rising cost of living. When you already have so little to begin with, the shocks from global crises will have a greater impact in every way. But DCM will be here to support them, and we know you will too. Our Te Hāpai service is not funded by central or local government contracts – but by YOU. This is why DCM’s byline is “Together we can end homelessness”. If you are in a position to help, here are some ways you can support us: Support DCM Together, in these most challenging of times, we will continue to empower those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless to reach their housing and social aspirations. Ngā mihi o te tau hou ki a tātou, Stephen Turnock  Manahautū <!-- --> Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest stories from DCM
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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } This month’s update takes a slightly different form as we look into New Zealand’s housing crisis from different angles. Building communities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact New Zealand’s housing crisis This month’s update takes a slightly different form as we look into New Zealand’s housing crisis from different angles. We have been talking to everyone from the decision makers, to private landlords helping solve the housing crisis, to those impacted by homelessness – the people we work with at DCM each and every day. Parties agree on supply, differ on other solutions New Zealand’s main political parties are continuing to debate solutions to the country’s housing crisis as new research shows that bipartisan housing intensification law changes are long overdue. Research by the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga, reveals that house prices have accelerated since 1980 because New Zealand cities stopped expanding and didn’t develop enough infill housing. Both Labour and National supported legislation in December 2021 allowing buildings of up to three storeys in cities without any need for resource consent. Houses in the Lyall Bay suburb of Wellington, New Zealand. Photographer: Mark Coote/Bloomberg. CC BY. But the parties disagree on other solutions to the housing crisis, and National plan to reduce the bright-line test from 10 years to two, and revisit interest deductibility rule changes for property investors, should they be elected in 2023. National Party Housing Spokesperson Chris Bishop says advice from officials is that the bright-line and interest deductibility changes put pressure on the private rental market. Housing Minister Megan Woods disputes this. “There is no evidence that those measures are putting pressure on the market,” says Woods. “We know that rather than leaving the rental market, multiple property owners account for 36.2% of activity (Q3 2022), close to the long-term average since 2017 of 36.5%. “It’s important to note the changes were made to discourage speculators and even the playing field for first home buyers.” In early 2018, the Labour-led government also banned foreign speculators from buying housing in New Zealand, but Bishop says they were never a big part of the market. “Labour for quite a long time didn’t want to deal with the underlying issue, which is supply. They have this thing around foreign buyers, and they have this thing around landlords – who they call speculators – when the actual issue is just supply,” Bishop says. Supply is where the parties agree, though the bipartisan housing intensification law changes are facing opposition from local councils, and National leader Christopher Luxon has also hinted at revisiting the rules. Bishop says National is committed to housing intensification. “The importance of this is that it gives certainty to the market. To developers, and people doing housing, that there’s now a shared commitment across the two main political parties that housing supply is really important.” Woods agrees. “That’s why this Government brought in the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) to allow more housing in areas where people want to live. In urban centres close to work, schools, public transport, and other amenities. “Similarly, the legislation that Parliament passed last year with near-unanimity, and acceleration of the NPS-UD, allows for more housing types and density to be built to meet the needs of New Zealanders.” Despite the progress made with private builds, public housing has lagged, with emergency housing a dire prospect for some, as revealed in Rotorua after an investigation by TVNZ’s Sunday programme. Labour has built 10,328 additional public homes since coming into office to date, but with 26,664 applicants on the housing register as of 30 June 2022, permanent housing remains out of reach for many. Bishop says he plans to eliminate housing waitlists altogether, but that it must be done through supply.  “The ultimate answer to everything related to housing in New Zealand is more houses. Everything comes back to that,” says Bishop. “You don’t have enough houses for people to buy, they end up renting. When you have more people renting – and less rental properties – rents go up. Some people can’t afford those rents, they end up on the waitlist. The waitlist goes up – there’s not enough social housing – people end up in motels.” Kiwibank has predicted that New Zealand will have a housing surplus at some stage over the next 12 months while building activity outstrips demand. Bishop says he laughed out loud when he heard the Kiwibank prediction. “My response is we will have a surplus when no one lives in a car and no one lives in a motel. And everyone who needs a social house can get one.” Woods looks to the record level of consents made – 50,736 dwellings consented in the year to June 2022, compared to 30,453 in the year to June 2017 – as significant progress. “We’re also mindful that a consent is not a house until it is completed. We’re closely monitoring building activity, particularly as there are headwinds due to global supply issues and other economic factors,” says Woods. “There is more work still to be done to ensure that the right types of dwellings are built where they are needed, and that they are affordable – whether for homeowners or renters.” This article was written by DCM's Kaiarataki Pūrongo Matthew Mawkes as part of a journalism course at Massey University. Special thanks to Lee-Ann Duncan for the newswriting tips. <!-- --> The landlords helping solve the housing crisis Matthew Ryan has been in the news a lot lately – you might have read about him on Stuff talking about property prices, or heard him on his fortnightly Hot Property podcast on Newstalk ZB. Often referred to as a ‘mega landlord’, what may surprise many is that Matthew is helping solve New Zealand’s housing crisis by providing properties to DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team. Matthew Ryan is our largest landlord, currently providing housing for 17 taumai. Matthew was born in Wellington in 1964. He has a lot of love for the city, where he has spent most of his life. He grew up in a working-class family, working at McDonald’s in Porirua from 1981-1985, where he made $4.34 an hour. “I’ve probably come from a bit of a dysfunctional family,” Matthew reflects. “It was a hard upbringing. I guess in adversity sometimes you have to rise above it. You can go two ways with things. You can decide to be a part of it, or you can make it work for you.” By 1987, Matthew had brought his first property with a friend. In the late 1980s, he relocated to London where he sold real estate. “It was a recession time in the United Kingdom, but it was fascinating living in a big city like that – all the opportunity,” Matthew says. “I was in my early 20s. I arrived with $5,000 – about £2,500 – and I ended up buying three properties by the end of it. I wish I had them now of course!” Back in New Zealand Matthew continued working in real estate – becoming a bona fide property expert in the process – and his focus is now on Wellington. “It’s a bit easier to manage houses where you live,” he says. Matthew is Aro Mai Housing First’s largest landlord, currently providing housing for 17 taumai. Our Housing First team started by taking a few properties, and when that worked out, Matthew offered more – in particular in the Hutt Valley, where a large number of taumai have been housed. “The relationship blossomed,” Matthew says. “Because it makes sense. “It’s taken a while to understand how it all works. Like a lot of things, it evolves as it goes, but I now have a better understanding of how Aro Mai works, and who’s responsible for what.” It takes support from DCM, Emerge Aotearoa as a CHP (Community Housing Provider), and property owners, to make Aro Mai Housing First work. And there are challenges, such as obtaining insurance, which infuriates Matthew. “If an insurance company is prepared to insure a building on the basis that I pick John and Mary Smith, they’re happy enough to rent on that basis, but if I give it to Emerge Aotearoa, and they pick the same John and Mary Smith, they go, ‘No we don’t want them’. “That has to be discrimination. And that is not on, really.” But Matthew says Housing First is an attractive option for landlords, because not only are they helping solve the housing crisis by renting to people who have experienced homelessness, properties are managed for them, and they can benefit from changes to tax deductibility rules. Matthew would like to see the government step in to address the insurance issue. “If they can’t force their hand they probably need to say OK, well, we need to assist here.” In the meantime, Matthew continues to offer properties to DCM's Aro Mai Housing First team. Our vision is for a community where whānau are housed, connected, valued, and thriving. In the middle of a housing crisis, we need many more landlords just like Matthew who are truly making that vision become a reality. If you would like to know more about how you can provide homes for the people we are supporting out of homelessness, please get in touch with our Kaiārahi Whiwhinga (Property Procurement Officer) Shaun. For more information about how Housing First works, visit our website and check out the story of Dev. <!-- --> Challenging perceptions about homelessness The phone call to police was simple, but urgent – “Someone’s dead on the side of the street.” So began John’s day rough sleeping in Wellington, as social workers from DCM woke him up, the police close by their side. It was a turning point for John, who is now housed in a property provided by Wellington landlord Matthew Ryan through Aro Mai Housing First, a government-funded initiative that helps people who have experienced homelessness for at least a year get into permanent housing. Aged only 27, John has experienced a decade of living rough, and challenges the perceptions people have about homelessness, which he says is not always about addictions and mental health – though these issues have crossed his path too. For John, homelessness came about as a direct result of being kicked out of home. “Family life was rough. Especially due to the religious abuse of my mother,” says John. “I got disowned two weeks before I turned 16.” John, 27, pictured in Te Aro Park. He is now housed after a decade of homelessness through the Aro Mai Housing First initiative that recognises that it’s easier for people to deal with complex issues if they have a stable place to live. Raised Jehovah’s Witness, Martin’s teenage rebellion saw him take to the streets of Whangarei. He started self-harming and was on a suicide watch for four years. “I’ve been pissed on, I’ve been shat on, I’ve been spat on. Been abused – physically and emotionally.”  Wanting a fresh start, John hitchhiked to Wellington where the lure of free coffee and internet brought him to DCM. John was able to access emergency housing and, through DCM's Aro Mai Housing First team, a permanent place of his own. “I have my own bed, a couch, a TV. I’ve never physically owned any of this stuff. My prized possession has always been my skateboard. Living inside, it’s kind of like – what am I going to do now?” John’s key focus is on his health, and he is currently going through very serious medical treatments. He looks forward to doing some training and getting into work, helping others his age who have also experienced homelessness. “Years ago I was hustling with a little sign out and this guy yells at me – ‘Get a fucking job!’ An hour or so later he comes back, sits down beside me, and we chat. I explained my history and he had suggestions. He found out I had done the yards. I said bro – don’t judge a book by its cover.” We are relieved that John has a whare of his own, where he can recuperate and focus on his wellbeing. To support people like John, we need many more staff, especially for our large and growing Aro Mai Housing First team. Not only does this team procure properties, they provide the wraparound support needed to ensure those properties are maintained, and that taumai are able to thrive. Do you know anyone who would love to work for our amazing organisation? Visit our website for more info. <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Ngā Kōrero - Latest stories from DCM
      • 96 Ngā Kōrero - Latest stories from DCM p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Looking back into the past, and toward the future, Jason remembers kindness – “The biggest thing on my list today.” Building commuities where whānau are housed, connected, valued and thriving About Us Contact Healing through kindness – Jason’s story It’s a cold mid-winter’s Monday morning at DCM, and the building is bustling with activity. Jason has just arrived for work, and there’s plenty to be done. Jason is going to show a new volunteer the ropes. Food awaits pick-up at some local churches, Kaibosh and New World – and when the DCM van returns back to base Jason will have food parcels to pack so taumai can receive emergency food assistance. For Jason, employed as kaiāwhina in DCM’s Foodbank, he knows that there are lots of little ways he can help. For example, “If someone needs an overnight food parcel, chances are they’re rough sleeping. So I’ll go out of my way to make sure they have some disposable containers, tear tabs – I couldn’t think of anything worse than being given some food and not being able to eat it!” Another day in DCM's busy Foodbank. Jason describes it as a selfless job. “It really gets me out of my own way, to help share the vision of DCM. I always walk away at the end of my shift feeling better about myself.” Looking back into the past, and toward the future, Jason remembers kindness. But life was not always kind to Jason, and he is remarkably honest about his journey. Jason was born in the Hawke’s Bay, where family life was pretty tough. “I had an alcoholic stepfather who brought violence into the home,” Jason shares. “My mum was trying to raise me and my two brothers and she kind of got trapped in this relationship and couldn’t escape.” Jason came out when he was quite young, and he was bullied at school. This had a big impact on him, as did working in hospitality from a young age. Jason is reflective about how drugs and alcohol helped him to suppress his emotions. “So you have the cultural aspects, and the family harm aspects, and also depression runs right through my family. I didn’t have good coping mechanisms. So one thing I learned is that when things get tough you just pack up and run. “I learned to pack very lightly, and not put roots down. I couch surfed, spending many years doing that. I learned that all your possessions are the clothes on your back, and what you can carry.” Jason was thrown out of places for not paying rent due to his drug problem, ending up in Australia. But despite the change of scene, and a good job in hospitality, Jason acknowledges, “I thought life would be OK. But I still hadn’t addressed that I had a drug and alcohol problem. Or that I was an addict.” It was back in New Zealand that Jason reached what he describes as his lowest point. “I remember getting to a point where I’d use drugs, walk around the house, and felt like I just ‘existed’. That was a scary feeling. I just felt empty, like I had nothing.” With family help, Jason was finally able to start the process of getting into rehab. That took four months, and in the meantime Jason started going to 12-step meetings, and anything he could find that was recovery-focussed. “I found online blogs of people sharing stories about how they managed to give up drugs, and I was drawn to that kōrero,” Jason says. “I thought, ‘Hang on, there’s a life outside this?’” After a relapse, Jason found himself rough sleeping. He went to Work and Income to ask for help with emergency housing, and they suggested popping down to DCM to get some food, where Dominic was his first point of contact. “I was a mess, but Dom was really kind. He helped me with a food parcel and then we had a bit of a kōrero about how DCM could help. I was willing to take whatever help I could get, and he said that Evan had just started at DCM, and that he would like to engage me with him. I wasn’t too keen on meeting a drug and alcohol counsellor! I just wanted to isolate in my own little bubble, and wallow in my pity. But as I was walking out of the interview room, Dom goes, ‘Oh, this is Evan here!’ So I didn’t have a choice in the matter! And that was kind of a turning point in my life.” Jason with DCM drug and alcohol counsellor Evan. From then, Jason started popping down to DCM regularly. “I would come down most mornings, even if it was only for a coffee and a chat to the staff. Just so that they had ‘eyes’ on me. I started opening my doors for change. I just let DCM in. “I maintained going to regular meetings – every single day, even when I didn’t want to. I joined Te Awatea. I would go along Mondays and Fridays. And have a kōrero in there with the other taumai, sharing my journey, and what was going on for me. It is so good that there is a safe space at DCM for people to speak openly and honestly. “Evan used to call me, saying ‘Hey brother, I’ve put your name down for this. If you’re not interested, you don’t have to do it’. As I started getting better I decided to take up the challenge of doing the things that scared me the most. And one of those things was doing the peer support training with Brodie and Hannah at DCM.” Jason was able to access other services at DCM, such as the emergency dental service. “I was terrified of seeing the dentist!” Jason explains. “I hadn’t looked after myself, but the dentist (Morris Wong) was amazing. He sees people. He talked me through my anxiety. It wasn’t as bad as I expected. I needed a tooth extraction and a filling, probably two things people fear the most. And he helped me through it. I went away thinking, ‘Wow, what a great experience!’” Jason also saw the Te Aro Health nurses at DCM. “Don’t even get me started on them! Rebecca and Bronwyn have been incredible, and super-supportive. I went to Bronwyn with a medical problem and she made it her business to push for the hospital to see me. They helped me, and it’s been great. She went above and beyond, just pushing for them to do something. “All the staff at DCM are amazing,” Jason adds. “All the staff who are there now, and those who have moved on.” Having completed training with PeerZone, another kaiāwhina (Renee) suggested Jason apply for a job working in the DCM Foodbank. “She set up an interview and I was absolutely terrified about going into a job. I hadn’t been in employment for eight years. I didn’t know if I’d be any good or be able to hold the job down. So much unknown, but I used a bit of courage. Then I thought, actually, the job’s not about me. I found purpose in the job and that’s about knowing that the mahi that I’m doing is impacting the lives of others today. “I used to give money to street beggars – until Evan pointed out the dangers. If I’m walking down the street now and hear a taumai calling out to ask for money I say, ‘If you’re hungry, pop down to DCM. WE can help.’” Jason now has a whare with help from Evan and DCM's Aro Mai Housing First team. He is proud to be housed, working, and officially off Work and Income’s books. He’s even ditched cigarettes. But most of all, Jason is proud to be living clean, one day at a time. “What I have learned in that time is to show others compassion and kindness. And that comes from the people who have loved me since walking through the doors at DCM. I wasn’t judged and they were there to help me. So today I try to see people and meet them where they’re at. I’m continuing to show that love and kindness to others.” Jason now has a life he never dreamed he’d have. “Some days I still feel like an alien trapped in my own body. I definitely don’t have it all together – but that’s OK. I’m on the right path. I’ve had many months of re-building my Te Whare Tapa Whā. I’ve learned core values and spiritual principles along the way. I’m a better person today, and I’m OK with who I am. “When I look back to my darkest times, what stands out to me the most are those who showed me kindness. Those who were able to be there for me, to say ‘It’s OK. It won’t be like this forever.’ “So I remember kindness – that’s the biggest thing on my list today.” Photoshoot by Gabrielle McKone. <!-- --> Te Awatea – Doing whatever it takes It's later on Monday morning at DCM – almost 11am. “Last call for coffee!” Clifton announces to the room. Some taumai get their final cup, while others mill around, waiting for Te Awatea to begin. Evan and Jo have set up the space, where taumai are welcome to come and go. They are joined by Clifton and other kaiāwhina, offering peer support for the group. Te Awatea is as accommodating as possible, though Evan and Jo will keep an eye on disruptions, and manage any behaviour that starts to impact other members of the group. Te Awatea is all about harm reduction – and today the nine members of the group start with a round of, “How are you doing today, on a scale of 1-10?” Some taumai rate themselves pretty high, a 7 or 8, while others are feeling a bit down today. A couple of taumai are dealing with medical issues at the moment, which is not making life any easier. Everyone shares how their weekend went. For some taumai, there are challenges. There are members of the group who freely share that they are dependent on drugs or alcohol, and feel stuck. But there’s no judgement from Evan and Jo, or from other taumai in the room. This is a safe space to share whatever you’re feeling, wherever you’re at. One taumai has to leave early to see a nurse. Before he goes he shares how he’s managed to reduce his alcohol intake. He had a great weekend, and is feeling good today. The group cheer him on – “Awesome mahi!” – as he pops out to see the Te Aro Health team. After the intros, Evan leads a kōrero about mental health. By sharing some of his story Evan knows that it will help break the ice, and get the group to open up about their own experiences. Taumai share how they face mental health challenges too, and some acknowledge that they use drugs and alcohol to self-medicate, but that it doesn’t really help. There are a lot of laughs at Te Awatea. Everyone is different – and there are some characters! – but everyone is so open and honest that it’s hard not to share in a joke or two, to lift the spirit in the room. As the session comes to a close Evan leads with the serenity prayer, “Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.” Taumai chat amongst themselves as they head off. Some are looking forward to the next session, which will take place on Friday. In the meantime, Evan and Jo have their own little side room at DCM for one-on-one sessions with taumai who need them. While the group focusses on harm reduction, the offer of other pathways forward is always there if that’s what it takes for taumai to thrive. “Whatever it takes” is part and parcel of DCM’s kaupapa. Te Awatea truly shows that kaupapa in action. It’s not just on Mondays we hear stories like these. Here at DCM we are privileged to journey with taumai towards their housing and wellbeing aspirations, each and every day. You can help support us by forwarding this email on to anyone you think may be interested in learning more about our mahi. We will share our Ngā Kōrero bi-monthly. <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • June Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
      • 96 June Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Clifton shares his story and we hear from Hapi again.  About Us Contact Clifton’s Story “I love being part of a major change in people’s lives.” Ko Clifton tōku ingoa. I was born in Wellington but lived in Ōpōtiki for the first 13 years of my life. I was raised by my Koro and Nanny in a whole house full of cousins and aunties and uncles. We grew up on the family farm. They had 14 children, so we were never without whānau around us. My favourite thing to do growing up was to ride my horse with my brother and cousins, down to the river for a swim or up the bush for a hunt, just exploring. My mother spent most of her time in Australia and down in Wellington. Then, out of nowhere, when I was 12 years old she turned up, and my brother and I went to live with her in Wellington. I have worked in a number of different jobs over the years. I started off in the family taxi office in Miramar as soon as I left Rongotai College. I have worked in the sugar cane fields of Fiji; I have had work with other whānau up in Ōpōtiki in kiwifruit orchards. Back in the early 2000s I worked for a time as a forklift operator. I was working for Fletcher Construction when the first lockdown began. When all the work stopped, I lost my job and my income. I was trapped in Wellington with no whānau support and nowhere to stay. I had to move into emergency accommodation. Clifton volunteered his time to support the DCM Foodbank Appeal in May. When was the first time I heard about DCM? It was during that first lockdown, and I was at AC International. There were three of us in the one room; myself and my two adult daughters. I saw a pamphlet about DCM, and gave them a call. Steph answered. I think originally I was asking for food, for a food parcel. It was a proper lockdown, and DCM was only open at very specific times. Steph told me to come down on the Wednesday morning, and I did. I told Steph that there were three of us in the same room. She said “we can’t have that” and got straight on to it. Paula arranged for us to move to two rooms at Halswell. My room number was Room 24, I remember that clearly. I was in one room, and the two girls were in the other. Once I was settled in at Halswell, Kat and Peni from DCM came over to speak to me – about getting housed! They spoke to me about finding the right place. I told them about the issues I had had, with places in certain suburbs where family and others from my past would come by. It was not so good. We agreed that I needed an apartment where others couldn’t just come in to my whare, and that it needed to be in the city. And it sure was meant to be! They offered me, Clifton, a place on Clifton Terrace! And I moved in – on 31 August 2020. Clifton with George on Super Saturday vaccine day. DCM supports people like me in so many ways. Not just with housing and food parcels, but I have also seen the audiologist, the dentist and the Te Aro Health nurses. I have been vaccinated at DCM – I had my first two shots there, and went off myself to get my booster. When I was in emergency housing, I would regularly come to Te Hāpai to get out and about and away from emergency housing for a while. I was always made welcome; the DCM kaimahi were genuinely interested in getting to know me, and hearing what my own hopes and dreams were. It was one of the DCM team, Dom, who supported and encouraged me to stop smoking. And then, a month after I moved in to my place, Kat asked me if I would like to work at DCM. I knew Fabian, and I had wondered how he came to get a job at DCM. The next step was for me to be part of one of the Peer Support courses which DCM offers to people who are interested in a kaiāwhina* role. No sooner was that done, than Kat came back to see me. She helped me with my CV and a cover letter. Then I had an interview at DCM – with Natalia and Paula. They asked me what sort of work I was interested in. I said I would love to work with the Outreach team, and they immediately agreed. They listened to me, to what I was keen to do. It was the ultimate miracle. Clifton is always looking out for ways to support others. He has stepped up to help all of DCM’s teams at one time or another. He enjoys working with Evan to deliver the Te Awatea programme (left) and participating in DCM training and team-building days (with Moses, Bella and Michelle at right). Since then, I have got to be involved right across the many areas of DCM’s mahi. I am part of the Outreach team, but I have also been out with Arieta, Adriana and George from DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team and with Nadeeka to support our Sustaining Tenancies mahi. I have worked in Te Hāpai, and on DCM’s Te Awatea programme. I have been part of the team delivering our Community Connections programme. I was even at the very first session when we launched the programme at Newlands. I love the patience and resilience of DCM. We roll with it. When taumai are ready, we go forward with them. If they are not ready today, we will try again tomorrow. There are endless chances. We won’t give up on you. And now, I have been able to add more mahi in to my week. I have also joined the Take 10 team, working with youth. On a Saturday night, we are out from 9pm–4am in the city, connecting to young people, checking that they are safe, even paying for them to get an Uber home when this is what needs to happen. We offer water, sweets, etc., to get the young people to connect with us so that we can check in with them. All the DCM taumai seem to go by! They greet me, wonder what I am doing there. The way DCM has stepped up during this pandemic has been ever so encouraging and inspiring. They have come up with ways of supporting those who need it most, regardless of the traffic light system or regular lockdowns. That’s what separates DCM from other community services – the constancy of our level of passion for the work we do. It has been exceptionally impressive – the aroha and manaakitanga I have experienced and have seen others experience over my time at DCM – first as taumai, and now as a kaimahi. Clifton with his team leader, Natalia, outside DCM in Lukes Lane. Natalia Clifton is the type of person who will do anything for anyone. He is generous with his time, cares about his colleagues and keeps his eyes and ears open for ways that he can help people. Clifton also loves learning. It’s one of his great strengths – he listens, watches, and then tries something himself. He also asks for feedback from colleagues which shows great strength of character and humility. He is always open to doing things differently or better. Clifton has covered so much work for DCM including supporting us on outreach visits, running manaakitanga in Te Hāpai, coaching new kaiāwhina, moving furniture for taumai who have become housed, supporting community connections mahi, and sharing his own story in Te Awatea to help the taumai open up and share their story. He’s probably the only DCM staff member who has worked across all services and all teams. How would I describe Clifton? He is collaborative, humble, kind, patient and always supportive. Of both his colleagues – those he works alongside here at DCM – and of taumai. Clifton is always ready to lend a helping hand – whether it is cleaning up the hall after one of DCM’s Community Connections afternoons (left) or staying behind with Fiona after DCM’s last AGM to do the dishes and tidy up (right). <!-- --> Hapi In January, we introduced you to Hapi and shared his story. Hapi is a creative and sociable man who is thriving in his new home, a house provided by private landlord Dev. Hapi loves his art, and this month, some of his pieces have featured in a very successful exhibition organised by MIX, a mental health service which offers programmes in art and wellbeing. Hapi’s work has been popular, with more than half of the items he has prepared for the exhibition selling on opening night alone. Here’s what Hapi has to say about what art means to him: “Bro, it frees my mind. It frees me. I’m free! I'm free and I don’t have no other thoughts about anything else, but just go for my own things. Do my own style of work. I feel awesome when I make anything that I know that I can do, or whatever vision comes in my mind. I just lay it out how it is. What really makes me feel good is other people love it.” You can hear Hapi speak about his art for yourself, in this brief film clip: <!-- --> Support DCM *DCM uses the term kaiāwhina, meaning a helper or advocate for those staff who bring lived experience to their mahi at DCM. We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • May Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
      • 96 May Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Today we introduce you to a few of our kaitautoko, people like you who support DCM and the most marginalised people in many different ways. Kaitautoko   noun Someone who supports, backs up or advocates for TOGETHER we can end homelessness – DCM's tagline acknowledges the many individuals, businesses and groups who share our vision and are part of team DCM. Here we introduce you to a few of our kaitautoko, people like you who support DCM and the most marginalised people in many different ways. Mon Mon has been supporting DCM for many years – in our Foodbank, at the DCM Bookfair, and as a regular donor. "It must have been 18 years ago that I first joined team DCM. I wasn’t working, and wanted to try something a little different. I first heard about DCM through Volunteer Wellington, and joined the team as a Foodbank volunteer one day a week, back when DCM was based in Eva Street. Steph was new in the role of director, and Pam Whittington was another key person on the team at that time. I sorted out the food donations and stocked the shelves in the Foodbank. I got to know Steph well and she shared a lot about DCM’s work and vision with me. After about a year, I got a full time job – but of course I wanted to continue to be part of DCM’s great work. Year after year, Mon was part of the team which delivered DCM's highly successful annual Bookfair. Here she is at the DCM Bookfair in 2014 (left) and 2017 (right). From 2005 right through until the final Bookfair in 2019, I was part of the team delivering the iconic DCM Bookfair, working with the book sorting teams during the year and at the Bookfair itself. In the later years, my job meant I could no longer help with sorting but I continued to work on the Bookfair weekend. Over the last four years, I have also been part of the DCM Foodbank Appeal, another great way to be involved over a weekend. As my working life has become busier and I have had less opportunity to support DCM with my time, I have chosen to become an AP donor, setting aside a little each month to support an organisation and way of working which I am totally committed to. Why is this? I guess I began with an understanding that I was fortunate while others were doing it tough, a sense of social justice and an awareness of the unfairness in our society. Over time, I came to understand more about the connectedness we have to each other. One measure of marginalisation is isolation, lack of connection, being unseen and unknown. Is that the worst thing of all? Quite possibly. To be invisible, to exist in a society where governments, societies, individuals, want you to be out of sight. DCM will NOT let this happen. Over all of these years, I have witnessed DCM doing an incredible job of truly seeing these people. Of knowing them, of connecting to them, and in turn connecting them to others. DCM is genuinely an organisation which is trying to do themselves out of a job! They really do make a difference in the lives of the most marginalised people. I love that they now regularly share awesome stories with all of us who support their work. The challenge to us now is to share those stories with our networks, to make the people DCM works with visible across our society. Through our time, our dollars and our sharing of stories, we can build and celebrate the connectedness we all have to one another." If you would like to know more about regular giving, please get in touch - donate@dcm.org.nz <!-- --> Tia Recently we put out a call for furniture for some of the people we are working with who are now housed. And then we received a message on Facebook... DCM kaimahi Stephen Bowater (left) and Moses Davis (right) visited Tia to pick up furniture for taumai who they are supporting. Tia was moving to the Hawke's Bay, and had a household of furniture to donate, which was great timing for a number of taumai who we are working with. She thought of DCM, as her late stepbrother Brad was supported by us and went on to work here. She was surprised and pleased to learn that we indeed remembered Brad, who died in 2014. You may have read the story of Russell in last month's update or on our website. So many of our taumai pass away at a young age. Brad was 47 years old when he died, but at that time he was housed and doing well. He wanted to give back to DCM, and had started volunteering in DCM's Foodbank as well as helping out at the DCM Bookfair. How special it is that Tia's furniture now lifts up other taumai - the items have been shared with several different people. What a wonderful way to support these taumai to thrive in their very own homes, just as Brad did. <!-- --> Restocking DCM's Foodbank It is that time of year again, when we need to re-stock our empty foodbank shelves for the winter. And this year it is more important than ever, with increasing prices placing even more pressure on those who have very little.  It’s a time when we are always reminded of the many different people who come together, offering their time, money, food donations or skills, to make our work possible. Here are just a few of the many supporters who were involved in last weekend’s Foodbank Appeal. Some are new faces, others will be very familiar to you all. Shaun Shaun Monaghan is DCM's Property Procurement kaimahi. Shaun and Tihema visited New World Chaffers on Saturday to support the DCM team. It was great to see DCM kaimahi popping by on Foodbank Appeal day. Day in, day out, Shaun works tirelessly, seeking out rental properties, speaking with landlords, finding whare for us to house taumai in. His partner Tihema is a dentist who has taken dental sessions at DCM. If you or anyone you know would like to find out more about providing a rental property for someone who is experiencing homelessness, Shaun would love to have a chat with you. And you can enjoy reading the story of one such very special kaitautoko, landlord Dev, again here. Stephanie DCM’s former director Stephanie McIntyre  You never know who may drop by to support the DCM Foodbank Appeal, including our former director Stephanie! "Stephen has done a great job of leading DCM through such challenging times. For many years, DCM has insisted that the answer to homelessness is homes! More than a decade later, everyone is now accepting this. None of the tail-chasing to set up emergency housing and transitional housing has been effective. All can now see that this is not the answer. I am very pleased that DCM remains committed to housing first, to supporting people to access and sustain their own homes. During the period since I left DCM, I have continued to be involved, albeit often at arm’s length, in finding ways to grow the stock of permanent homes for DCM’s taumai. And I know that DCM will continue to deliver the wrap-around support that is essential for taumai to thrive in their homes." Shaun DCM Board member Shaun Greenslade-Hibbert and his husband Alan helped out at the Foodbank Appeal. Shaun joined the DCM Board in 2021 as a representative of the Religious Society of Friends, a community which has been supporting DCM since the very early days. He trained as a nurse in the 1980s and has worked in palliative care for over 25 years. Shaun arrived in New Zealand from the UK in January 2019 to continue his work in palliative care at Mary Potter Hospice. He has welcomed the opportunity to support DCM’s work in any way that he can – including taking his turn on Foodbank Appeal day, welcoming shoppers and telling them about our work. Wesley Church It is quite a job, sorting and labelling the food we receive at our Foodbank Appeal. DCM is very grateful to Wesley Church for providing the space to sort and store this much needed kai. Wesley Methodist Church has been supporting DCM since we began as ICM back in 1969. In fact the original DCM office was located at Wesley. They have always been there when we have needed them – providing space for community events like the Thanksgiving meals we hosted with the US Embassy, a room for our uke band to practice, putting a basket out for food donations at their church services, and groups of volunteers whenever we need them. Many Wesley Church members also choose to donate regularly to DCM. And now, with space all over this city at such a premium, Wesley has stepped up again and provided somewhere for DCM to store kai, and to sort food donations during our two annual Foodbank Appeals. Tree and Rhea Tree was down at New World Chaffers last week, ensuring that the DCM food donation bin was clearly marked ready for the weekend's Foodbank Appeal. We love it when people reach out to us and suggest creative ways that they can support our mahi. Tree Mackay is an accomplished designer who approached us to offer her time and skills. She has helped us re-fresh our food donation bin at New World Chaffers. Rhea is part of a team of talented students who have been undertaking some design work for DCM, developing new templates, infographics and digital tools for us. She created some designs and flyers to let people know which items we most need for the DCM Foodbank. "I'm currently undertaking post-graduate study at Victoria University. I first heard about DCM through Ignite Consulting, an organisation which connects students with socially conscious organisations. A few weeks ago, I was able to visit DCM and see first-hand the work being done and the tangible difference DCM is making in people's lives." If you were not able to drop some food items in over the weekend, why not pop down to New World Chaffers, have a look at Tree’s handiwork, and leave some of the items suggested in Rhea's beautiful shopping list for DCM to provide for taumai. Yes, it takes many different kaitautoko to deliver DCM's mahi and vision. And this month, once again, you all stepped up, supporting us when we needed it most. TOGETHER we can end homelessness – we cannot do this important mahi without you all. It’s as simple as that. <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • DCM – together we can end homelessness – one very special story
      • 96 DCM – together we can end homelessness – one very special story p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Many of the people DCM supports die at a young age. Today we share the story of Russell, who died two days before Christmas last year. Remembering Russell Two days before Christmas, the team from DCM stood with two police representatives down on the waterfront, at the site where the body of a man they had all supported over the years had been found that morning. After a karakia led by the police iwi liaison kaimahi, the DCM team sang waiata, beginning with “Te Hokinga Mai”...   ...TANGI ANA TE NGĀKAU I TE AROHA... How my heart weeps with sorrowful love... HEI ORANGA MO TE MŌREHU, TANGI MŌKAI NEI... The survivor cries out with loneliness... E RAPU ANA I TE ARA TIKA... Seeking out the right path...   Russell Fleming was born in Palmerston North and spent his earliest years in Levin. Later the family moved to Lower Hutt. Russell had two older sisters and two older brothers. His mother describes him as her “surprise baby”. Growing up, Russell learned many skills from his father. He loved tinkering with bikes and as an adult, this continued to be something he enjoyed. On the morning of Russell’s funeral, there was a bike in his flat which he had been working on. He rode bikes; he rode scooters. This was part of who he was. His father Hugh helped him get his heavy truck driver’s license. Russell always saw himself as a worker. This had been one of his family’s core values. Drunk or sober-ish, he would say to us “I have to get a job!”; “I have to get my truck driver’s license back.” His mother recalls how, when they were together, he would say, “You sit down, Mum. I will make you a cup of tea.” His house was clean. Even on the day of his funeral, there was his washing drying on a clothes horse indoors. Russell’s undoing was his alcohol addiction. He kind of didn’t have a choice. He faced so many challenges – addictions, mental health, a back injury and a head injury, which he attempted to address through self-medication. Combining his prescription meds with alcohol led to a seizure. Being diagnosed as epileptic meant he lost his truck driver’s license and could not work, something that was so important to him. As a result of this complexity, Russell could not access or receive the support which he needed, something we often see with the taumai we support at DCM when they experience multiple, complex issues. He did not fit in one category; the fact that he needed support around all three (mental health, addiction, cognitive impairment through head injury) meant he slipped through the cracks of secondary health services. Russell lived a mobile life, but was always drawn back to Wellington, to this area, to “home”. And so many people in Wellington were connected to him and were part of his story: his friends in the street community, the street cleaners, the Wellington City Council local hosts, his lawyer, all the different tenancy managers, Mōkai Kāinga and the community gardens – even the police were fond of him! At DCM, Russell connected with and was supported by so many of the team over the years – from the dentists, eye doctor, and Te Aro Health nurses to many DCM kaimahi. Every team at DCM was part of his journey – the Outreach team when he was rough sleeping, the Sustaining Tenancies team when he was struggling to stay in a home, and towards the end of his life, he was housed again through the Aro Mai Housing First collaboration. Here a few of those he was closest to, share their memories and reflections about Russell. Russell loved spending time with Natalia and Rob. Natalia Natalia Cleland, DCM I was the first person Russell met when he came back to Wellington in 2018. He had been living at a campsite in Nelson, and he said to me, “I can’t keep living on the street! I need a house!” He connected with people well, and was able to voice his own aspirations well. I didn’t want to be the one who told him that there was no house for him. I wanted to be in his corner, supporting him. So I put him on the line to the MSD Social Housing team. He howled and screamed down the line – “I need a house! I am going to die out here!” He absolutely demanded a house – and he got one! This is when he got his first tenancy – at Lower Hutt, just around the corner from his parents. “Yes, the housing stuff; well, it’s stuffed!” – this was probably one of the most incredible things Russell said. He was really smart and could see what was going on in the broken system. Not just looking at his personal situation but seeing that he was caught in a system that was “stuffed”. I was blown away by his insight and how he didn’t complain about his homelessness necessarily but rather he called out the problem for everyone. He was such a friendly guy, so happy and gregarious. In every photo shown at his funeral, he is smiling, laughing. This was his strength, but also the challenge. He was so connected, he didn’t always know when to step back and give others some space. His personality could be too much for others at times. Russell was always connected to his family, even in his dis-connection. He always wanted to be re-connected to them all. There was a birthday card from his parents that he kept on his mantelpiece in his final home. When we mentioned this to his mother, she said that it would have been a card from several birthdays ago. He had carried it around with him while he slept on the streets and put it on display when he moved into that final house.   “Yes, the housing stuff; well, it’s stuffed!” Russell Fleming Robert Robert Sarich, DCM How would I describe Russell? He was ENERGETIC – literally a ball of energy. And he was LOVING. He was also completely and utterly committed to social justice. I first met Russell on Lambton Quay. I was out on outreach, walking along the street en route to work early in the morning. I explained where DCM was and left him a card. “Please come down and see us,” was my kōrero. He was open to this, immediately, which was awesome. When he was housed out at the Hutt, I helped him move in. He was always positive. He was only ever negative when he was drinking. I guess that in a past time, he would have been the lovable town drunk. As I say, Russell was committed to social justice. If things were going wrong for other people, he would often raise it with us. He would tell us about the person, tell us that they needed help, tell us that it wasn’t “fair” how things were for this person. You often had to listen and reflect, wait to see what it was that Russell was getting at, what it was that was going on with the person he was concerned for. But often when you got to the heart of it, Russell was bang on. Russell was assaulted a few times, when his behaviour was just too big for others to deal with. He would advocate for himself too. I thought it was very brave; he would go to the police, name no names, but he understood he needed to do this – for himself, and for others. “If they could do it to me, they could do it to anyone, Rob!” he would reflect to me. My feeling is that Russell was a lot more settled in the final months of this life. Russell knew that he was loved, not merely tolerated. Yes, he was a loved ball of energy, dressed in a beautiful korowai. Hamish Hamish Knight, Police City Community team, Wellington I have been in the Police for 14 years, and Russell Fleming is one of those characters like Ben Hana, who you really connect with, who many people know and have connected with. He had that wow factor. He has evolved over time; he has grown and he has changed. And it’s not just that the numbers of bangles up his arm have been added to, the jewellery has changed. But some things have also stayed the same. Russell has always been pleasant to chat to. Banter. That’s the word. Russell and I enjoyed plenty of banter. He went through his camo stage, with that huge backpack, full of everything! I would pretend that I couldn’t see him in his camo gear. He would be calling out to me, and I would be going: “Who is that talking? I can’t see anyone!” Yarns – that’s another word. There were some big yarns about his life. I usually had to cut him off or we would be talking on and on and on – forever. He was talkative, yes, but he was never disrespectful of me, of police, of authority. I didn’t arrest him; there was no offending that I dealt with. I would take the alcohol off him. He would listen to reason. Like when I would explain that he was just being too loud. He knew he needed to tone it down; he just didn’t really know how to go about it. He didn’t go looking for trouble, but it did seem to find him at times. Russell seemed to be on the fringes. In so many ways. On the fringes of many friendship groups, but never at the heart; never quite experiencing the connections and close friendships he seemed to want. That was a bit sad, watching him try to find a place he belonged.   “I am a homeless person. But I look out for others.” Russell Fleming Joe Pastor Joe Serevi, Salvation Army I first met Russell at DCM. He was sitting outside, and he wasn’t having a good day. I said to him, “Come on, let’s go for a walk and have a chat.” I took him for a cuppa. Russell just loved to talk, and that’s how I began to connect with him. Russell was such a character, with his great big backpack, and his military fatigues. He was intelligent, and this shone through whenever you had a kōrero with him, especially when he was sober. He was one of the more challenging people on the streets, and he found it very challenging when he got housed. Those four walls and living alone were difficult for him. Russell was someone who really needed and was always seeking connection with other people. I was privileged to be one of those people, and to be able to support him in different ways over the years. Russell Russell Fleming, in his own words Many of you have “met” Russell through DCM’s film clip. He was keen to be involved with this – he saw it as a way to lift up DCM and acknowledge the support he, and others, had received from the team. At the time, he was rough sleeping. In amongst all of the film footage which Ocular shot while making the DCM film clip are conversations which the film crew had with Russell. Producer Steph Miller pulled some of these reflections out for us this month. There is Russell, in his own words, talking about his life and about homelessness. He speaks about the complexity – of being so used to the street that he often felt more settled there:   “It’s hard. Every time I go in to a house, I am used to being out here.” “A house. It’s just four walls, you just sit there and do nothing. Whereas out on the street… I guess it’s more of a social thing.” ...while at the same time being totally over it, and wanting to have a safe place to be – ”But then again, you want a house cos you are sick of it.” He asks the film crew – “If you were homeless...would you be able to go to sleep at night, in the cold, in the wind, in the rain?” Over and over again, Russell lifts up DCM.    “Natalia is a lovely person; she has put me in to a few houses and stuff”; “Natalia and that; they are cool. DCM are cool fellows!” At the same time, he draws attention to the key underlying issue – too many people experiencing homelessness and too few houses:   “Natalia and DCM; they are doing a really good job! But they have had to help so many people.” “DCM have so much on their plate, dealing with so many homeless people!” “Yes, the housing stuff; well, it’s stuffed!”   And his own kaupapa and commitment to others also comes through, as he shares examples of times when he has been able to help others, especially young people experiencing homelessness and addictions.   “I am a homeless person. But I look out for others”.   Sia Sia To’omaga, DCM Russell was little, and loud, and often all over the place with his thoughts, with his kōrero. When he was referred to our team, he had a property in the Hutt, back when DCM’s Sustaining Tenancies team was still covering the Hutt. When he was living on the streets, he was bullied. I would go out and look for him, go out and find him. He found a safe space for himself, up by parliament. We knew where to find him. At DCM, we have housed him three or four times, and have tried some different options. The challenges were always around his drinking and his behaviour. He could get to a situation where he didn’t feel safe in the whare or living situation we had sorted for him, and then he would return to the street. One day a few months before his death, he came in to DCM; he was drunk and he was loud. He was calling out to me. “I am going on a course, Sia! Then I can get a job.” He had this card; he was anxious that he might have missed the course, the chance to do this. I was asking him to calm down and to explain what was going on slowly and carefully to me. Here I was trying to call the number on the card – and then a phone call came through! Magic, amazing timing. It wasn’t the same name or number as on the card, but it was a man named Tone, calling to ask DCM about Russell and the course. Tone and I figured out that we knew each other, and we were able to make sure there was a spot on the course reserved for Russell. But it wasn’t going to be easy. When I heard that this training course was going to be at a place at the bottom of Ngauranga Gorge, and that it was going to begin at 7.30am – well, I did not know how Russell was going to get to the right place at the right time. But you know what? He made it! And he completed the course!   The last time I saw Russell, I congratulated him on passing the course. He showed me photos of his house on his phone. I said to him “Wow, Russell! You could eat off the floor. It is so tidy! Well done.” Russell kept a beautiful home.   Yes, many things were going well for Russell in the final months of his life. He was housed – in a home provided by a private landlord. He was more settled and was feeling very hopeful that he would soon be able to work again. After his death, Tone called Sia to ask how he could forward on Russell’s certificate. Sia had to let him know that Russell had passed away, but that the team would love to pick up the certificate. Russell would have been so proud of this achievement, and sharing it with the team at DCM has been another way of acknowledging him, and all that he meant to so many. Two days before Christmas, the team from DCM stood with two police representatives down on the waterfront, at the spot where Russell’s body had been found that morning. With Rob Sarich on guitar, the team sang waiata, ending with “Ma te kahukura”... MAU ANA TĀKU AROHA Cloak yourself with my love WHAI AKE I NGĀ WHETU Follow the pathway to the stars RERE TŌTIKA RERE PAI Fly straight, fly true RERE RUNGA RAWA RĀ E Soar high towards the heavens. Russell Mark Fleming 31 Mar 1974 – 23 December 2021 “A loved ball of energy” <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • March Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
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Introducing Jason - "And then something magic happened..." Jason’s Story TOGETHER we can end homelessness Jason is an amazing artist. He loves colour and painting; Wellingtonians love purchasing his artworks. Jason is resourceful and articulate. Over the years he has struggled with addictions and with his mental health. These challenges led him to move away from his whānau in the Hawkes Bay, and to sleep rough in and around Wellington for many years. Jason’s story shines a light on DCM’s tagline, as we reflect on the community - the “together” - who walked alongside Jason until, one day, something magic happened...   Robert Sarich is a member of DCM’s Outreach team Robert shares, “I first met Jason back in 2018. He was rough sleeping for a long, long time, but he was always affable, approachable, articulate. He didn’t want to talk about housing, but the more he got to know us and to trust DCM, the more open he was to listening and accepting our support in other ways. The difficulty was how to find him! He was rough sleeping in a cave, but there would be absences, so sometimes we needed to find him out on the street. In the early days, one thing he did need was food – and that became a conduit so that we could talk to him more about his housing. Then Janet joined our team, and her connection with Jason made such a difference. She was very strategic and intentional in the way she would engage with him. She would keep him up to date, and in great detail, which is what he needed. This further built his trust in us, and his willingness to work with us.” Janet Dunn worked as a Wellington City Council local host, before joining DCM’s Outreach team, working alongside Rob   Janet remembers, “I first met Jason when I was working as a local host. He was living in his “cave” up in Kelburn, and would regularly sell his paintings on Lambton Quay. I loved them, and ended up buying two of them. This cemented our connection – and this continued when I took on the role on the Outreach team in 2019. Jason’s art was one of the levers to housing for him. He needed to keep his art out of the weather, and he needed storage for his materials. But neither was possible when he was rough sleeping. He didn’t feel okay about being part of any of the art programmes around town – they weren’t his thing. He needed a space to do this on his own, at the right times for him. So one of our regular messages to him was, “Jason, you know we want you to thrive, and we can see that your art is central to this. We need to find a place and a way for you to do more painting, to be able to enjoy your art.” There’s another thing about our mahi at DCM. As kaimahi, as the people building strong connections with the most marginalised, we begin to hold, to carry, to nurture, their hopes and dreams for them. At a time when they cannot dream or hope, we carry this - gently and carefully. When they cannot see the possibilities and the joy the future may hold for them, we see this for them. In March 2020, COVID arrived in Aotearoa and we experienced our first lockdown. When Jason heard that everyone had to be off the streets during lockdown, he moved in with a friend, couch surfing. He found that he could spend time indoors, in a home.” Janet outside the “cave” where Jason slept rough for a long time. She says: “You know, last year – after Jason had moved in to emergency housing - there was a big storm and a landslide with a tree sliding right down over the entrance to his “cave”. Had he been still sleeping there, he would have been buried.”   DCM in Lukes Lane When rough sleepers walk through the doors at DCM, feel welcome and safe, we are able to connect them to a wide range of supports, and to further build connection and trust. The first time that Jason came to DCM was to see a dentist. It was May 2018, and – experiencing a lot of pain – Jason had attempted to pull his own tooth out, leaving some remnants behind. He saw dentist John Buckerfield that day. Later he would also receive major treatment from John Taylor-Smith and Louisa Leathart. The DCM Dental Service is another way that DCM builds connection with taumai, demonstrating in a very practical way that we are committed to being there for them when they need us most. Jason spent time at Te Hāpai, the purposeful space at DCM which offers so much more than coffee, kai and manaakitanga. DCM kaimahi connected Jason with MSD and took him through the steps needed to access ID. DCM became Jason’s address for mail, and each time he popped in to collect his mail, we could again encourage him to keep thinking about housing. He saw the nurses from Te Aro Health at DCM from time to time. And last year he came in to DCM for his COVID vaccinations. “And then something magic happened...” Tabitha George-Koshy, DCM kaimahi on the Aro Mai Housing First (AMHF) team “It was Janet who first introduced me to Jason – the connection she had formed with him was invaluable when it came to building his trust in me. It took about three months of joint visits to him out where he was sleeping before we began to sense a shift. Then two things happened – it was the beginning of winter and it was Jason’s birthday. Janet and I headed out to visit him the day before his birthday. And our kōrero went like this – “it is your birthday tomorrow, Jason, and it’s time for a change. We are going to visit you on your birthday. We are going to bring you chocolates – which we know you love. We are going to pick you up and we are all going to DCM – to talk about what we are going to do to get you in to a place.” And Jason said, “Okay”!!! We could not believe what we were hearing. We turned up the next day, and YES! He was there and he was ready for us. Off we went to DCM, where first of all, we spoke about emergency housing. We were able to talk about his concerns around EH and some of the misconceptions he had. I rang Jo Smith at MSD and she rang the Set-Up. Within an hour, it was all sorted, and we took Jason to his room. He walked around exclaiming, as if he couldn’t quite believe his eyes. “Oh my goodness! A shower!” then “Wow! A kitchen?!” And the story doesn’t end in April 2021, with Jason moving to the Set-Up on his birthday. No, the story just begins then. Because by the end of the year, Jason moved in to his own place.” “I still don’t know exactly what happened. But it did happen!” Janet continues, “How did things come together so that Jason felt able to give emergency housing a go, and then to accept a house, and to settle in a home, after all this time? It is hard to pinpoint one single thing; as we often say at DCM, it was magic. Several things all came together at the same time. Something turned. Robert Sarich always says, “We play this long game at DCM.” Like I said, his art was one of the things. Then there was the fact that during lockdown he had those few weeks staying in a house, spending time there and beginning to develop an image or a dream of what could be possible. His family connections were also important. Jason returned to the Hawkes Bay for his father’s funeral. I think while he was there he began to HOPE, to hope for a better future for himself. For a future which could include his own daughter. There was a new optimism. And then came his birthday. We were able to message to him: “You are not getting any younger, Jason; it is time to think about getting yourself a house.” As always, Jason’s response began with “oh yes, but I don’t want to think about getting a house. Not just yet.” And we were able to reply: “But we ARE thinking about this, Jason. We are thinking about it for you. And we think that it IS time.  It is a really good idea for you – right NOW.” “I can be me now!” Jason has now been housed for three months, in a property which has been provided by a private landlord. He is caring for his whare, enjoying his art and the space to be himself. Says Rob Sarich, “When he was housed, one of the things I saw in him was that he could just be himself at last – more feminine – and with a lot more pride, because he felt safe and secure. “I can be me, now” he said to me one day. It was great to see this happen for him, and so quickly.” Janet reflects on Jason’s many strengths: “You know, just before his birthday last year, we noted that Jason’s boots were all worn out. We offered to get him some new shoes. Of course he had absolutely no interest in “sensible shoes”! “No! I will get my own shoes!” he told us. Which he did – he found his own new shoes. He is very resourceful. We just want him to channel that resourcefulness into other things. Not to surviving in a cave. But to thriving in a community. A community where he is accepted, and able to both give and receive. This has been the dream we have carried for Jason for some years now, and now it is his dream for his own life. And it is a dream which is coming true.” Just as they did last year, the team are looking forward to delivering chocolates to Jason again on his birthday - next month. Only this year, they won’t have to go out to find him where he is rough sleeping. They will be delivering them to him...in his own home! Photographer Gabrielle McKone is a DCM donor and supporter. She headed out with Tabitha to visit Jason in his new whare and to take these photos of him – for Jason, and for all of us, to enjoy. We encourage you to read – and enjoy – more of Jason’s story and Gabrielle’s beautiful photos on our website. <!-- --> DCM Dental Service Emily Kremmer This month marks the 6th birthday of the DCM Dental Service - an excellent opportunity to acknowledge Emily Kremmer as she comes to the end of three years as lead dental assistant (DA) at the DCM Dental Service. Here she shares her story. Emily has supported Frances Ruddiman as a DA, both at DCM and at Wellington Periodontists. "I took my first session at DCM as a DA in 2018. That very first session was with dentist Lucy McGowan. Then in early 2019 I took on the role of lead DA. DCM supports people who have such complex needs and so many challenges in their lives, when often nobody else will. As dental professionals, we are just a part of a whole team working together in so many spaces – from food, income and housing, to mental and physical health and addictions, to connecting people to their whānau and their community. There have been so many fabulous moments with taumai, so many times when I have felt so, so proud to be part of this special place. I guess it is some of the earliest ones which stay with me. From the time when I was just beginning to understand taumai and homelessness, and gaining an insight in to the complexity of this. There was one woman we saw at the dental service who had suffered a chronic injury and could not work. She had used up all her savings and the means at her disposal, and lost her home. She didn’t know where else to turn. Her situation really struck me. If any of us did not have the support of our families and our loved ones, this could happen to us. Then there were the days when with a small investment of our time, we were able to make such a difference in the life of a taumai. There was a woman who had a significant chip in her front tooth; she had lived with this for many years. She had not come to DCM to have this dealt with, but John Buckerfield noticed; he could see that there was something extra we could do which could have a huge impact. And so we patched it up. It made the world of difference to her. She saw her own face, her own smile and was so grateful. She cried. I cried. It was such an emotional experience – being aware of how much we could achieve with just an extra 10-15 minutes of our time. It is time for me to move on now. Some doors closed during the global pandemic, but now they are beginning to open again. Jack and I got married this month. Next month I will graduate with a Bachelor of Communications. And then, after several false starts due to COVID, Jack and I are finally going travelling. Three years later, what would I say to anyone thinking about taking a dental session at DCM, either as a dentist or a DA? It always comes back to the joy of being able to help taumai, the joy of supporting the most vulnerable people in our community. It is ALWAYS worth it. One of the unexpected benefits for me has been meeting so many different dental assistants and dentists. Working alongside them, seeing the different ways in which they work. And more than that; it is that true sense of being part of a caring community. When you see a dental assistant from one practice working alongside a dentist from a completely different practice, you witness the Wellington dental community working together to support the most marginalised people in Wellington. <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • February Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
      • 96 February Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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font-size:12px; line-height:150%; text-align:center; } .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Dev Singh has purchased a number of rental properties for DCM to house people we support who have long histories of homelessness. Getting to know you... Dev A landlord's story Dev Singh has purchased a number of rental properties for DCM to house people we support who have long histories of homelessness. Here he shares his story, and talks about the benefits and the challenges of being a part of this mahi. "I am originally from Fiji. I was born and grew up in Suva and I came to New Zealand about 35 years ago – in 1986 – to study commerce at Otago University. I studied commerce and then accounting and also completed a law degree at Vic. I have worked as an accountant for different organisations over the last 20 years or so. Currently I work for two charities, Arts Access Aotearoa and Disabled Persons Assembly (DPA), for four days a week. One day a week, I set aside for my property portfolio. I grew up in a large whānau. Parents, grandparents and other family members, uncles and aunties – we supported each other as one large family home. The main thing my family taught me is that – always – people come first. We need to look after each other, support one another. These are the most important things in life. I lived in various rental properties for some 20 years, when I was a student in Dunedin, and for years after I moved to Wellington in 1996. Then I built my own house in Churton Park, finally completing it in 2006. A few years after I had built my own home, I decided to purchase one property as an investment – that first property was in Porirua. That’s how I became a landlord. Since then, on average I have invested in one more rental property each year. I now have properties in Porirua, the Hutt and Wellington city. I have several properties which now house people who are supported by the DCM workers on the Aro Mai Housing First team. The best thing about it is that you are providing homes for people who really need them. So that gives me satisfaction. There’s also the fact that the rent is paid regularly – I don’t have any issues with rent. And the tenants are supported and managed by DCM – I don’t have to worry about that either. Last year I spent some $35K upgrading one property – painting, plastering, carpeting, and making the kitchen and lounge open plan. I like to do this kind of work – it’s very uplifting for people when they move in. One of the tenants DCM is supporting came by a few days before her tenancy was due to begin, watching our progress and getting very excited – she wanted to move in right away. It was great that she was able to get a nice place to live. Yes, there can be some issues. But things have always been sorted quickly. The DCM team are great to work with and I find it very easy to get in touch with the Emerge Aotearoa tenancy managers, Vicky and Victor. There’s a whole team supporting us as landlords, and it all works really well." Dev If you would like to know more about how you can provide homes for the people we are supporting out of homelessness, please get in touch with our Director Stephen Turnock at director@dcm.org.nz or by clicking the button below:   I'm interested in providing a home <!-- --> Getting to know you... Hapi, Mandy, Michelle Dev's tenants Today we hear from three of the taumai who have been housed in properties provided by Dev Singh. You met Hapi in last month's update. Here's what Hapi, Mandy and Michelle have to say about getting into a home of their own: “Having your own place means a roof over your head for starters. But more than that. It takes the worries off. I’m not having to rely on others and I can stand on my own two feet. I’m fenced in and I’m a bit off the street, so it’s quiet. And my neighbours are beautiful to me. I think it’s important to put people in the right properties. And this is the right place for me.” Hapi Mandy outside her whare. “Having a whare makes me feel protected – I have somewhere to go. When I was on the streets, the biggest issue for me was safety. Now I have a warm and cosy home I can return to. In the first couple of weeks I would return to the streets and have to tell myself over and over again: ‘No! You have a home now!’ I am so comfortable now. I have a partner and I’m taking part in the cultural programme at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. I love attending the Māori and Pasifika book clubs. It is great to be a part of my community.” Mandy "I love living in Petone. It took a while for me to get used to living in a home. But now I am very well connected with my neighbours on either side of my house. I love walking everywhere. I will only take the bus if it rains. I share lemons from my lemon tree with everyone. I do love my home." Michelle <!-- --> Getting to know you... Evan Supporting taumai with addictions With his background and training in AOD (Alcohol and Other Drugs), Evan leads DCM’s Harm Reduction programme, Te Awatea. He also supports people with long histories of homelessness to access a home and to go on to thrive in their lives, as part of DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team. Here he shares a little of his own story, and explains why he loves being part of this work at DCM. Evan leads DCM’s harm reduction programme. "From the time I was a young child, members of my family have had serious addictions – I grew up in that world. I have had many struggles myself – with addictions and my mental health. About 10 years ago I came out of rehab; I was honest and I acknowledged that I had issues I needed to deal with. I was asked to go and speak at a hui focused on rehabilitation, involving ten judges. My support worker at the rehab centre suggested I would be a great person to speak to them all. One of the judges really encouraged me to consider studies in AOD, and offered to pay my tuition fees even. Once I was out of jail, I began with a six month foundation course at Weltech, and then went on to the degree course. Throughout the three years of my degree, I worked at a rehab centre as a support worker. It was Carol Devlin, who had been my support worker 10 years earlier, who told me about the role at DCM, and encouraged me to apply. And my learning has continued here, it has been amazing. I didn’t even know about harm reduction and harm minimisation when I came to DCM. It is definitely the way to go. I came in to work for a few days each week, and now I am a full time kaimahi at DCM. My mahi involves everything from running our Te Awatea Harm Reduction drug and alcohol programme through to housing people. Evan with Peter, a man he has supported in to a home of his own. I love DCM. I love the team – so many characters, so much fun. I love the support I get, from my fellow kaimahi, from everyone at DCM. I love the wins – seeing someone in a home, something they may never have had or experienced. Seeing the look on their face. They cannot believe that this is THEIR place. I love the way we are doing AOD at DCM. It’s harm reduction, but it’s more than that. We make it as easy as possible for the most marginalised people, those with complex unmet needs, to connect with us in this space. There are no referrals. We don’t want people coming to Te Awatea because they have been told they must. Taumai can come and go as they please; they can come late, leave early – they are always welcome. I share with them about my issues. I am on their level, I am alongside them. We do this together. I begin to build a good relationship with them, to connect to them. The group really support one another. It is beautiful. They are non-judgmental. Last week one man said “My house is such a mess.” Another taumai offered “Do you want me to come and help clean it up?” They don’t know each other; this is another guy going through some hard-core, heavy stuff himself. Yet still he offers to support a man he has only met recently. I love that we have found ways to keep our AOD programme going through everything that COVID has thrown at us, and continues to throw at us. These people need it! We have found ways to stay safe and yet keep these taumai, people with very significant addictions and challenges in their lives, going forward, feeling supported and connected. And I love that there is always plenty of laughter – because, like me, the taumai who attend just love it too! What would I say to someone thinking about joining me on the team here at DCM?  If you want to experience something in life that you have never experienced before, this is for you. The learnings are incredible.  You will be at the forefront of this sector and mahi. Every day is different - and this mahi is so fulfilling!" Evan   If you are interested in joining the team at DCM, we have several roles for kaimahi to be involved in supporting taumai to access a home and to thrive in their lives. If you have AOD qualifications and experience, we also currently have a vacancy to work alongside Evan in this field. Please send your CV and a covering letter telling us how your skills and experiences have prepared you to join us in this work to suzy@dcm.org.nz or click the button below:   I'd like to work at DCM <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Hapi, Mary and Megan share their stories
      • 96 Hapi, Mary and Megan share their stories p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } In this first update of 2022, we introduce you to some people who are part of the “together” in our tagline “together we can end homelessness” TOGETHER we can end homelessness In this first update of the year, we take the opportunity to introduce you to a range of people who are part of the “together” in our tagline - “together we can end homelessness.” Getting to know you... Hapi We love introducing you to taumai. Today we hear from Hapi. Hapi in his own home. Hapi is a very sociable man who enjoys company, art and gardening. He has been homeless at several different times in his life, most recently sleeping in his van. Over the years, DCM has supported Hapi in many ways – in particular with food, support around his benefit and Work and Income, and with his mental and physical health. He has seen a dentist at DCM five times; each time he has been suffering considerable pain due to numerous broken and decayed teeth. Hapi has always enjoyed finding ways to give back; those of you who have visited DCM in Lukes Lane will have seen the carving he created to thank DCM for all the support he has received.  Hapi has not always kept the best of health. Needing a hip replacement, he was told that he would not be able to have the surgery unless he had a home to return to from the hospital. Our Aro Mai Housing First team stepped up to support Hapi to find a home in the area he most wanted to settle, the Hutt Valley. And so it was that last year, Hapi was housed in a property at the Hutt which was provided by a private landlord. Since then, Hapi has worked hard, transforming the property into a thriving garden where he grows potatoes, pumpkin, corn and tomatoes. He is a talented artist and many of his carvings and art works are on display in his whare, which he keeps very tidy. Hapi says it’s easy to keep the place clean when you live alone, but he also shares, “When you do get a house, you should make it the best you can”. Nearby at MIX (a mental health service offering programmes in art and wellbeing), Hapi now volunteers, sharing his artistic skills with his local community. Hapi with his DCM support worker Karen and his Emerge Aotearoa tenancy manager Victor. Taumai who are housed through the Aro Mai Housing First collaboration are supported by two key people - their own wrap-around kaimahi, and a tenancy manager whose focus is on supporting the most vulnerable tenants to thrive in their homes. What does it mean for Hapi to have his own whare? “A roof over your head for starters. But more than that. It takes the worries off. I’m not having to rely on others and I can stand on my own two feet”. And the best things about his whare? “I’m fenced in and I’m a bit off the street, so it’s quiet. And my neighbours are beautiful to me. I think it’s important to put people in the right properties. And this is the right place for me.” Next month we will introduce you to Dev, the landlord who purchased this home for Hapi to live in. If you would like to know more about how you can provide homes for the people we are supporting out of homelessness, please get in touch with our Director. <!-- --> Getting to know you... Mary We love hearing from our supporters (kaitautoko). Those of you who follow DCM on Facebook will have noted that this year we are featuring a different kaitautoko each Monday. We are calling this Manaakitanga Monday. So many of you are part of our mahi to end homelessness – this is why DCM has adopted the tagline “together we can end homelessness”. And so each month, we will also feature one of our supporters in our monthly update. Mary Hutchinson headed out with Karen and Victor to visit Hapi this month. She is a GP and a keen photographer who has volunteered her time and skill to support DCM from time to time with photo shoots. Arriving at Hapi’s whare, she realised that she had met him – and photographed him – before! Just some of the photos which Mary has taken for DCM. Mary takes up the story: “I have known about DCM and your great work for many years. In my role as a GP at Newtown Union Health, we were often supporting the same people as DCM. I clearly remember visiting Pat Hill at Te Aro Health during the early days. She introduced me to a man who was sleeping under the motorway, who had no home and no income or benefit. She talked about DCM being a key organisation in the city, working with marginalised people. “More recently, I have been able to support DCM in a different way. I enjoy being able to go out with members of the DCM team to take photos, when they need these. I have met some lovely people and heard some great stories. Like Alexi. I so enjoyed getting to know him and hearing his story – about how he had been supported to get housed by DCM, and had gone on to work at DCM. I went out with Alexi to the home of a taumai who needed support in cleaning and caring for his whare. I am thrilled to hear that Alexi is still working at DCM and has gone on to a fulltime role on your team. Mary first met Hapi back in 2017 when she took this photo of him with his aunt. Five years later, Mary is photographed standing in the same spot in Newtown. “I first met Hapi in 2017 in Newtown. He was out on Riddiford Street, talking to his aunt, Connie. It was late in the day, and they were happy to have me photograph them. His face, his smile, his warmth – they were unforgettable. When I headed out to take the photos of a man who DCM was supporting, I didn’t realise that it was Hapi, that it was someone who I had met before. He immediately recognised me, and he went to get the photos I had taken of him five years ago. Yes, he had them with him, there in his new whare. What a privilege to be able to go on and take new photos of him, with the people who have supported him in to a home of his own, and who are working with him so that he can truly thrive in his home. “When I get to meet (and sometimes photograph) the taumai you work with, they demonstrate a sense of pride – in what they have achieved, in what you have achieved together. Something great has happened to them, and they value this. At DCM, you always lift them up, build them up. This is such a contrast to so many other portrayals of these people. And I too am lifted up by being able to be part of your mahi.” <!-- --> Getting to know you... Megan We love introducing you to members of our team (kaimahi). Today we hear from Megan; she has been part of the amazing team of nurses from Te Aro Health who run a satellite clinic here at DCM. Farewelling Megan - After more than 12 years at Te Aro Health, the team farewelled Megan this month. DCM’s Director Stephen Turnock thanks Megan and presents her with flowers on her final day at DCM (left) and Megan at her desk at Te Aro Health on her final day (right). "I have absolutely loved working at Te Aro Health. Leaving is very difficult. I love the patients; I love what we do. Everybody is entitled to respect and to healthcare, and we are committed to delivering both. I have especially loved the team – close-knit, stable and so supportive. They are really good clinicians, and all of them are passionate, good-hearted people. We are united in our mahi, a true team, and all committed to manaakitanga. "I have valued and will miss the connections with patients. There are those who DCM and Te Aro Health have supported over many years who regard us as their family, like Cheryl. I have loved getting to know people like Johnny - getting to the stage in our connection where he has shared stories of his childhood; we have shared our life stories with one another. He used to ride horses, something he really misses now. His father would go out rabbit or possum trapping. It was a different time, a whole different life. What a privilege to share these memories. "A highlight from our collaboration, and my time working here? Well, look at the fantastic team effort recently, as we all supported Jane (not her real name) during the final weeks of her life. She was a private person, and there had been years of little engagement. But we were the ones she let in during those final weeks, days and hours. She died surrounded by people, in a room full of sparkles, balloons and colour. She died just before her birthday, so the team at DCM had decided to celebrate her birthday early and fill her room with joy. I feel very privileged to have been part of her journey, especially during those last weeks. "I am so lucky to have had this experience. And if there is anyone reading this who would love to use their nursing or GP skills to support the most marginalised, I encourage you to have a chat with Bronwyn at Te Aro Health. There are roles there, and opportunities for you too to be part of this amazing mahi. Together, we are all achieving something very special.” Megan shares more about her career and time at Te Aro Health Centre in this story on our website. Bronwyn Boele Van Hensbroek-Miller is a nurse practitioner and a registered midwife who is the clinic lead at Te Aro Health. You can get in touch with her here. <!-- --> Support DCM We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Happy New Year from team DCM
      • 96 Happy New Year from team DCM p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Looking back - and looking forward to 2022 Looking back over 2021 Here at DCM, we like to celebrate the special moments that can be found in each and every day. In 2021, we have been sharing one such moment every week via our social media channels - on “Taumai Tuesday”. Here we look back on a year of Taumai Tuesdays... We celebrated when taumai moved into their own homes, often after many years of homelessness - like Peter and Jason. Jason sent us a letter soon after: "Dear DCM crew, I would like to express my gratitude to all of you for helping me onto the next step of my journey and finding me a house. I'd like to acknowledge the humbleness and humility within your organisation, and the way you all treated me as nothing less than human. For that I am truly grateful." We loved being able to take taumai who had recently been housed, out shopping to purchase much needed items for their new whare. This was made possible by the generous donations of vouchers that some of you provided. At DCM we celebrate tuku atu tuku mai - when taumai are able to lift up others. Frankie made a beautiful speech of acknowledgement on the day John Buckerfield took his 100th dental session at DCM. Trevor popped in to DCM to let us know that it was exactly 9 years since DCM supported him in to a home of his own, and to thank us for always being there for him. And Uoneone came in to thank us for a birthday card he had received in the post from DCM. “I didn’t even know it was my birthday!” he laughed. We are all lifted up when taumai express their thoughts and their thanks through the written word. We shared some of these with you on Taumai Tuesdays. And in a year which was once again overshadowed by COVID, we celebrated the courage of taumai who stepped up to be vaccinated. For so many of them, this was very challenging, yet they picked up the paddle (ki te hoe), often sharing with us the many different reasons why they decided to be vaccinated. In 2022 our weekly focus will be on our supporters, the many different individuals, groups, businesses and communities who, like you, make this amazing mahi possible. If you don’t already follow DCM on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter click our links so that you too can acknowledge 52 different supporters who are part of “together we can end homelessness”. <!-- --> Looking...and seeing clearly Here at DCM, we are farewelling a very special supporter - our retiring eye doctor Paul Herrick. Paul’s contribution to the most vulnerable people in our community has also been acknowledged by his profession, with a story about his work at DCM featuring in NZ Optics magazine. We share part of the story below; you can read it in full here. “We have so valued Paul’s generosity and commitment to the vulnerable people we work with every day at DCM,” said Michelle Scott, DCM’s manager of health services. “When he first approached us, we hadn’t even dreamed of being able to offer this kind of support. To see people leave with a pair of glasses and a big smile on their faces says it all.” Reflecting on the years he has volunteered his ophthalmology expertise at DCM’s hub in Lukes Lane, Wellington, Dr Herrick said he found the eye complaints very similar to those he encountered at hospital. “It’s a place of triage. Some patients just need reading glasses, others need to see an optometrist for refraction, while some, mostly with cataracts, are referred to Wellington Hospital.” “In some ways, it is a drop-in clinic. And, in the course of a few hours, many can be seen and helped. Unless you offer a service like this, at a place where the most marginalised people genuinely feel welcome and so spend time, you don’t find out what the issues are and what support is needed.” Herrick’s patients - or ‘taumai’ as DCM calls them, meaning ‘to settle’ - are grateful for the eye health services provided. “I was having blurred vision and starting to get pretty worried about my eyes,” said taumai Jay Jay. “Paul checked my vision and told me I might have what’s called a macular hole. He’s now referred me to a specialist and I’m making sure I get along to my appointments so this can be fixed.” Athena discovered she had cataracts after seeing Herrick. “I wanted to get on top of my health concerns, so I saw Paul. He found out I had cataracts! That was a big surprise. I’m pleased though, because he explained to me that this can be treated, so I’m looking forward to getting it sorted soon,” she said. “I’m just one of a whole community who brings their skills to DCM,” said Dr Herrick, adding that his dentist, David Corcoran, regularly offers taumai dental sessions at DCM. “The fascinating thing about working here has been meeting such a broad cross-section of people. Some come in with a backpack containing all their worldly possessions. When I was making a referral to the hospital, one man gave his address as ‘The Soup Kitchen’. The most amazing thing for me, however, has been watching the DCM staff, how they are with people, how they know all of them by name. It’s a very special place and it has been very special for me to be part of this work.” DCM is keen to connect with other eyecare professionals who may like to help out occasionally at DCM. For more info, please email Matt. <!-- --> Looking ahead - to 2022 Several of our kaimahi are looking forward to new experiences in 2022. Some have just joined team DCM, while others are leaving to take up new challenges. Dom and the Outreach team Dom: “There is a living culture here, which runs right through this place. New people come in, they see the culture in operation and in evidence, and they pick up on it. We are patient, we are forgiving of some of the behaviours which other organisations can’t see past. We don’t encourage it or facilitate it, but the important thing is that we welcome and work with these people. I planned to stay two years and I have done that and more. There have been many challenges along the way. All of us, kaimahi and taumai, are faced with a housing crisis and rising rents. We are all impacted by the global pandemic. We have so much in common. There is definitely something special about this place. It’s the taumai. Yes, this is what I will miss most about DCM - the very special people who have allowed me to walk alongside them, to be part of their journey. I have been so lifted up by them all.” Jay and George head out to deliver food support to taumai during lockdown Jay: “There has never been a day when I have NOT wanted to come to work here at DCM! I can’t say that about anywhere else I have worked. This is a testament to the people, and to the mahi, at DCM. No two days are ever the same. In many work places you can come in on a Monday and plan your week. Here, you come in on a Monday and cannot even plan your Monday afternoon! And at DCM we truly manaaki taumai. As an organisation, we are absolutely true to our core values. The time has come for me to return to Rotorua for a while, to support my parents at a difficult time. I am going to continue this mahi with Emerge. I feel very lucky to have found a role which I believe will hold the same core values as we have here at DCM. And I am going to do this because the mahi here has been so amazing. I am continuing the journey I have started on here. This will be my way of honouring the taumai and kaimahi at DCM, and I am going to carry a little bit of everyone with me.” New kaimahi Kendra especially loves being part of a team which feels more like whānau Kendra: “I didn’t even know about DCM until my lecturer at university told me about this place. He suggested I come down to DCM to see if it was a place I might like to do my placement for my social work qualification. I had an interview with Paula and Natalia, and began my placement not knowing what to expect. And of course I loved it, and never wanted to leave. In November I took on a role working full time at DCM. I love the environment, the relationships with taumai, and the way we all help and support one another. I haven’t worked in a true team environment like this before. You don’t have to have a specific qualification; we all bring different skills and talents to the team. All you need to have is a passion for building relationships and rapport with the most vulnerable people, and a can-do attitude. If this sounds like you, come and join my team!” <!-- --> ...and as you also look ahead - to 2022 At this time of year, we know that we all look ahead, and think about what we might like to achieve in the new year. If you, or anyone you know, is thinking that they might like a change of job, or - even better - that they would LOVE to work at a place like DCM, please encourage them to get in touch with us. You can read about some of the opportunities here:   Kaimahi/Key Worker AOD Counsellor/Key Worker Role Housing Procurement Specialist We also need more dental assistants. You can read more about this mahi here and please get in touch with Matt if you would like to know more about opportunities to work at the DCM Dental Service. ....or maybe you would like to become part of the amazing team of individuals who make a small but regular contribution to our mahi. We really could NOT do what we do without you guys having our backs. There are a couple of different ways in which you can do this:   Support DCM Join One Percent Collective <!-- --> We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • November Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
      • 96 November Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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font-size:12px; line-height:150%; text-align:center; } .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer{ min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupContent{ padding:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCaptionLeftContentOuter .mcnTextContent,.mcnCaptionRightContentOuter .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardTopImageContent,.mcnCaptionBottomContent:last-child .mcnCaptionBottomImageContent,.mcnCaptionBlockInner .mcnCaptionTopContent:last-child .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardBottomImageContent{ padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockInner{ padding-top:0 !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockOuter{ padding-top:9px !important; padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Fiona's story Fiona's story My name is Fiona, and I am very proud to be part of the team at DCM. I can’t tell you how much it has meant to me to have this job, and I just love it! But I have always been a worker. I was born in Christchurch in 1962; I was the only girl and grew up with my six brothers. We had to earn our own money because mum and dad were pretty broke. Dad was a slaughter man but it was seasonal work, and my mum was a nurse. We used to go around the streets with home grown veges in a wheelbarrow, my brothers and I. We did raspberry picking on weekends, and I had a paper round. I then went into the shearing sheds, shearing sheep with my brothers. From the age of 15, I was a gang member. Robert Muldoon set up a scheme to help gangs back then, to help them get into work and off the street. I started my apprenticeship to become a chef – it took four years: the first year in the vege room, the second year washing dishes, third year kitchen-hand and in the fourth year I went from third cook, to second to first cook. My gangster career ended when I got a long prison sentence. I made the decision right there and then: I don’t need the gang. I would stand on my own two feet – finally. I used the system to better myself. I joined kapa haka which built my confidence and self-esteem. I put my head down, supported myself in prison by bone carving, and went to all the groups I could think of to sort out my issues. I sat School Cert and academically I grew. But after all those years in jail, when I got out, I realised I still needed to grow emotionally. DCM was there for me when I needed them most. Let me tell you about that. I moved to Wellington 12 years ago where I married my husband. He got cancer and I looked after him for 3 months before he passed away. That led to me abusing alcohol. I moved to a one bedroom flat in Island Bay where I thought I could start over but things went downhill from there. I lost my job, didn’t pay my rent and found myself on the verge of homelessness, and suicide. My power was getting cut off and I was told that I couldn’t go on a benefit for 13 weeks. I heard about this organisation in the city called DCM, so I walked in from Island Bay, asking for help along the way. I believe if I didn’t come down Lukes Lane that day, I would have given up there and then. That’s when my life changed. DCM worked with me to help me get into a new place which I’m still in today. I got on to DCM’s money management programme which helped me pay my rent and bills on time, and debts as well. I’m debt-free today! And I have savings for the first time too. It’s amazing. There are many other great memories of my time as taumai at DCM. The Te Reo classes were very special, and I just loved being part of the DCM Ukes - the rehearsals at Wesley Church, performing at Thanksgiving and other events at DCM. I got a lot out of the self-management for health and wellbeing course I did at DCM too. Yup, DCM supported me when I needed it most, and now I am honoured to be able to support other taumai. I began by volunteering to cook at the DCM Bookfair. On Christmas Day I was part of the team at Te Aro Community Centre feeding the whānau. Then DCM started running peer support courses, and several of the team suggested that I should take part. After the course, I finished off my CV and applied for some of the roles going. I started as a paid support worker – a kaiawhina – at DCM in February 2020, just before the COVID lock-down. During the first lock-down I was working with taumai in emergency housing. We were mainly at the old Night Shelter, doing welfare checks, and other peer support work. Back at DCM, it has just been brilliant. I love the whānau! And especially the equality – being treated the same. I’ve worked all my life but I have never before been in an environment where people are treated as equally as they are at DCM. Peer support can cover a whole lot of tasks. I can be working in Te Hāpai in the mornings, interacting with taumai. I’m there to listen, observe and support. In the afternoons, I may be out with other kaimahi on home visits. We have a lot of taumai who have recently been housed, and we go in to support them. I do the basics – cleaning and showing taumai how to clean. We’ve dealt with hoarders, people who have a lot of challenges, and people who don’t even know how to cook a piece of toast. But generally our taumai take great pride in their whare. They just need the utensils. I ask them what their favourite food is. If it’s scrambled eggs, we make sure they have a frying pan and a whisk, along with some of the basics we take for granted, like a toaster or a microwave. And I love the “Welcome to Your Whare” packs which DCM puts together for people moving in to a home. All those cleaning items are expensive for taumai. Providing them with the basics, and seeing the pride on their faces when they ki te hoe (pick up the paddle), and take care of their own whare, that is a special privilege. I am able to do more and more, to take the initiative. I have a clean driver’s licence, so I can help with driving, shopping, deliveries and home visits. I have finished a Literacy Aotearoa course and am three-quarters of the way through achieving a certificate in health and wellbeing which Paula has been helping me with. I want to do to anything I can to keep developing my skills. Because DCM has given me an amazing opportunity, and I want to grab it with both hands, and to really play my part on this very special team. Most of my work now is with the Aro Mai Housing First team, supporting people who have long histories of homelessness. Photo shoot by Gabrielle McKone. Let me tell you about one man we have housed recently. Patrick* is a long-term rough sleeper who struggles with a critical mental health condition and severe substance abuse, as well as the after-effects of traumatic experiences from his childhood. Now he has his own home – thanks to a local landlord who provided the team with a whare. Twice each week I head out with Patrick’s keyworker to check in on him; we make sure he is doing okay and looking after his whare. To begin with, there was so much about living in a house that he didn’t understand. He didn’t know how to take the washing out of the machine, hold a vacuum cleaner or wipe the benches down. It is the simple stuff that we can show him, and which makes such a difference. Things like what to do with cigarette butts – you don’t drop them on the floor when you have a whare. And we celebrate the small changes – like rather than leaving his dirty clothes scattered all over the floor, he now puts them into his washing basket. Yes, now he is really looking after his home – it looks great. This year I have also been double vaccinated – right here at DCM. It wasn’t easy for me, and it took a while to make the decision. But then we had a vaccine day with Bronwyn from Te Aro Health. I know and trust her and her team, and then I saw taumai who were getting their vaccines and they were so brave. Finally, my fellow kaiawhina Rochelle encouraged me, and we decided to do it together. I am so pleased that we did, because we can now support our taumai, and we know how much they are going to need our support when COVID hits Wellington. Our work will be even more important, and much needed.  Our ultimate goal is to end homelessness and I believe we will get there. We’re all part of the solution. And the work we do here at DCM is a major part of that solution. I am proud and privileged to be part of this team. <!-- --> Jordon Jordon was recently housed thanks to another local landlord who provided a whare, and the support of our Aro Mai Housing First team. This is the first time Jordon has been housed in over a decade. When her keyworker Bella asked her what the best part of having her own whare is, she shared “Having my very own bed - being on the streets is really hard”. We love to be able to lift up taumai like Jordon who have done the hard mahi needed to get housed. Bella was able to take her out shopping thanks to those of you have have donated vouchers. Jordon got herself some items for her bathroom, sheets and two new pillows. “I am excited to be able to put bedding on the spare bed so that I can have family to come stay, hopefully my youngest son... Thank you so much guys, I really appreciate it.” Ka mau te wehi Jordon! <!-- --> Acknowledging David Zwartz At DCM’s AGM this month, we were able to acknowledge the contribution of retiring board member, David Zwartz, who joined the DCM board in 2005. A member of Temple Sinai and a past President of the New Zealand Jewish Council, David has been a passionate advocate for interfaith cooperation. He is proud of the different perspectives which are now involved in DCM’s governance, and hopes that this will continue to widen. Thank you David for all your mahi on behalf of the most marginalised people in our community. <!-- --> Re-stocking our Foodbank Kia ora rawa atu ki a koutou! Thank you to everyone who purchased items for our Foodbank re-stock on Saturday, to New World Chaffers and Wesley Church for providing the venues, and to our lovely team of volunteers who gave up their time to collect the items and sort them. If you weren’t able to get down to the city last weekend, we would love any groceries you are able to drop in to our collection bin at New World Chaffers. And our friends at Ngaio Union Church accept donations for our Foodbank on the first Saturday morning of each month. That means that you can drop some items to them this weekend.  <!-- --> How can I help? As we look ahead to 2022, and a time when COVID will be in our communities and a part of our daily lives, we know that the people DCM supports will be the most impacted. They will need our support more than ever as they experience illness and isolation, many of them without any family support. If you would like to make a donation to DCM this Christmas so that we can continue to provide this level of support to the most vulnerable in the year ahead, please visit our website. If you are, or know, a landlord who would like to speak with us about providing a home for people like Patrick and Jordon, our Director, Stephen Turnock would love to hear from you. Together, and at the most challenging of times, we will continue to do something very special. <!-- --> *Not his real name. We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Douglas shares his story - October at DCM
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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Douglas is a warm-hearted man of Samoan descent who has faced many challenges in his life, struggling to find spaces to belong. Douglas's story 'O LE TAGATA MA LONA AIGA, O LE TAGATA MA LONA FA'ASINOMAGA' 'A person and their family is a person and their identity' - Samoan muagagana (whakatauki) Douglas is a warm-hearted man of Samoan descent who has faced many challenges in his life, struggling to find spaces to belong. From childhood, things have not been easy for him. He was removed from his family at a young age, and as an adult has struggled with addictions, and poor health. He has been able to hold down a tenancy at some times in his life, while at others he has cycled through various forms of homelessness – rough sleeping, couch surfing, emergency accommodation and the Night Shelter. Douglas has connected with many different DCM kaimahi since he first walked through our doors in 2008, in particular our Pasifika and Māori staff. Over the years, he has been supported by a wide range of DCM services. When he was unable to access a bank account and benefit, this gap was filled by DCM’s Money Management Service. DCM has supported him with budgeting and Work and Income advocacy, and with sorting his debts. Douglas has received emergency dental treatment at DCM on several occasions, and has lost count of the number of times DCM has stepped in with food support for him when the money has run out. Douglas has now been housed for some time in Berhampore, with the support of DCM’s Sustaining Tenancies team. But perhaps even more importantly, DCM has been able to support Douglas to rebuild connection with his family, and to connect and find his place in his own community. Photo shoot by Nikki Parlane. “I was born in Wellington and grew up in a Samoan family. My father was the caretaker at Wesley Methodist Church on Taranaki Street. I was the ‘black sheep’ of my family. I didn’t see eye to eye with my father or my brothers due to my sexuality,” Douglas shares, “which isn’t just a Christian thing, it’s also cultural. Growing up, I didn’t feel loved because of who I was. It was hard for them to accept me.” But through it all, Douglas never lost his desire to reconnect with his whānau. This disconnection and sense of rejection had a lasting impact on him, and on his mental health and addictions. As DCM built stronger connections with Douglas, it became clear how very important this reconnection was for Douglas’s wellbeing. Sia To’omaga is DCM’s Practice Lead. Her team delivers DCM’s Sustaining Tenancies and Community Connections programmes. They work with vulnerable tenants in their communities so that they do not fall back into homelessness, and are supported to thrive in their lives. “We have so many connections with Douglas,” says Sia. “Even before he came to DCM back in 2008, he already knew Regina from the Benefit Rights Service, where she used to work. And Douglas and I have a family connection. So when I came to DCM I already knew his whānau. And I knew Douglas was estranged from them, and how much this had affected his life. When his father died, it was a chance for him to reconnect. We made sure he was decked out in new clothes and new shoes and Regina and I took him to the funeral. He had to sit up front. That was a huge moment for Douglas, and the significance of that moment is hard to explain. Mostly it was a time to heal old wounds. Since then Douglas has been trying to make sense of his world. By the time of his brother's funeral, his relationship with his whānau had improved massively.” “I was left out in the dark,” agrees Douglas, “until I lost my parents. Then, my relationship with my brothers started to improve. Finally, when my older brother died, I was able to really connect with my other siblings, and we’ve been a lot closer since.” In Samoan, so'otaga refers to the making of connections, and feso'otaga to the connectivity between people. The past 12 months have brought more challenges for Douglas. The Covid-19 lockdown was hard on him – “There were no positives for me – though I understand it’s better to be safe than sorry. The hardest part for me was being stuck in a bubble. I wanted to reach out to my brothers and nieces, but I couldn’t.” He has also been coping with other health concerns. Recent surgery has made accessibility to his whare a challenge, but with DCM’s support, he is working through that as well. And the past year has brought positives too. Douglas is really enjoying connecting with DCM and his community at his local community centre. Sia and DCM’s Sustaining Tenancies team lead DCM’s community connections programme. When people move into their own homes, we want to spend time with them in their new communities, rather than having them come in to DCM in Lukes Lane. This programme is focused on building strong connections between taumai and their neighbours and other groups close to their homes, so that they can not only sustain their tenancies, but thrive – in their lives and their communities. Douglas rates the Community Connections programme highly. “I think it’s a good move. It’s good for people to see DCM out in the community. A lot of people don’t know what DCM’s about, so it’s great that the staff can catch up with people right where they live. It’s not just those of us who have been supported by DCM for years who can be part of this, but others who are struggling too.” Sophie McKenna is the lead dentist at the DCM Dental Service. Her calm and reassuring manner is a taonga, and she is able to support taumai who have considerable anxiety around dental treatment. At an emergency appointment at DCM this year, Douglas saw dentist Sophie McKenna, who discovered that he had a bad infection which needed urgent treatment. Sophie was then able to catch up with Douglas at DCM’s first mobile dental clinic right in his own community at DCM's Community Connections programme there. She checked on his progress, and explained how a referral for dentures could work to better improve his oral health. Douglas has been following this up and is getting along to the hospital appointments needed to make that happen. He has also been fully vaccinated against Covid at DCM’s vaccination clinics, and is regularly attending counselling sessions. “Mama Dee suggested I keep that going, so I will.” During his life Douglas has done a lot of voluntary work, especially with Pasifika social services where his fluency in both English and Samoan has been an asset. He has to focus on getting his health back on track first, but then he really wants to get involved with peer support at DCM, so that he can support others to build connections. He knows how very important this is. “I’ve had some tough times,” says Douglas, “and DCM has been there to back me up. Thank you to all those I’ve connected with over the years. And especially to Sia, Regina, Stephanie, Alan, Ula and now Mama Dee. Thank you for being there for me.” “The majority of the people who come to DCM are estranged from their families,” says Sia. “When we have the privilege to be part of whānau reunification – at any level – it is such a beautiful thing. We don't take the positions we have here for granted!” Douglas is on a pathway to the life he has wanted for so long, a life in which he has his own place to call home, and regular contact with his family. His is a story about the importance of connections, and about the transformation that can take place in the lives of the most vulnerable when we are able to support them to build and rebuild those connections – with their whānau, with us and with their communities.   <!-- --> In the news... Interview with Stephen This month DCM’s Director Stephen Turnock talked about our mahi with Maggie from Radio Active, DCM’s neighbours in Lukes Lane. Tune in to hear the interview here! COVID vaccination clinics The New Zealand Herald visited DCM to learn more about the COVID vaccination clinics which DCM and Te Aro Health have been running for the most vulnerable people in Wellington. Read all about it here. Saturday 16 October saw DCM kaimahi out encouraging New Zealanders to get vaccinated. Super Saturday And of course also in the news this month has been the Super Saturday Vaxathon. DCM kaimahi headed out on the streets that day to encourage people to take the opportunity to get vaccinated and to point them in the right direction. This is one very important thing we can do to protect the most marginalised in our community, including those who are experiencing homelessness. One of these DCM kaimahi was Bella from the Aro Mai Housing First team. “It was genuinely a fun day,” she tells us. “People were really positive. Most were already double vaxxed but we had quite a few people asking to be pointed in the direction of the vaccination centres – wanting to make the most of the walk in, no booking opportunity. Lots of people who were already vaccinated thanked us for the effort. I got myself vaccinated when DCM first got called up. Being a young, healthy person, I didn't really get vaccinated for myself. Rather I got vaccinated for those who are more vulnerable...my grandparents, taumai, those who are immunocompromised. If me getting vaccinated can play any part in protecting these vulnerable people, then I'm happy to do this. To those who are hesitant, I would suggest that you take the same approach. I understand being worried about the impact it might have on you, but if you can – it really is the selfless decision to protect those more vulnerable than you.” <!-- --> How can I help? Get vaccinated! Here at DCM we are doing everything we can to ensure the Covid vaccine is as accessible for taumai as possible, and you can help protect the most marginalised in our community by getting vaccinated too. It has never been easier. Help us re-stock our Foodbank On the first Saturday of the month, Ngaio Union Church open their doors to receive food to help re-stock DCM's Foodbank shelves. Please bring along any food items you would like to donate on Saturday 6 November to 3 Kenya Street between 10am-12pm. We also have a Foodbank bin at New World Chaffers where you can drop items off anytime. And on the fourth Saturday in November we will be holding our Christmas Foodbank Appeal. Follow our Facebook page for more updates or if you would like to help, please get in touch with Matt. Vouchers for taumai We asked; you delivered! Thanks to all of you who donated vouchers for us to take taumai out to purchase items for their new whare. Sharnia is someone who has had a really tough time, and we're proud to see the progress she has made right up to being housed recently. Bella was able to take her to Briscoes to choose for herself some much needed items for her new home. Sharnia really enjoyed this: “Thank you so much, this is so fun, I’m excited!” We have now used up these vouchers and would love to receive more so that other taumai doing the hard mahi to get housed can also be lifted up in this way. If you can help with this, please drop off vouchers to DCM or visit our website. A heads up... On Tuesday 23 November at 5:30pm we will be holding the DCM Annual General Meeting. This may be able to be held in person, and/or we may need to facilitate this year’s AGM by Zoom. If you would like to attend, please email us and we will be in touch with further details. <!-- --> *We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021
      • 96 Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021 p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Lockdown 2021 has seen us working together once again to ensure that the most marginalised are supported at this challenging time. Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021 Just as we did in 2020, Lockdown 2021 has seen us working together once again, to ensure that the most marginalised are supported at this challenging time. From DCM kaimahi, to our team of health professionals, to our wonderful supporters - here members of team DCM talk about their work supporting the most marginalised during the latest lockdown. Natalia Outreach team Natalia and Joanne headed out on outreach together during lockdown. “We had a pair on outreach every day during lockdown, following up on notifications sent to us from the council or the public. We had way more notifications in the three weeks at levels 3 and 4 than we had had in the previous entire month. During lockdown, everyone on team DCM works together, doing whatever it takes to support taumai* during these challenging times. Members of our Outreach team have manned the 0800 number, been scribe support for kaimahi who were on the ground, supported on-site sessions, and delivered food and welfare checks, all on top of following up on notifications. Members of other teams have also gone out with us when we have needed support. Joanne has been a fantastic member of team DCM for some years now; she is currently part of the Aro Mai Housing First team out at the Hutt. One afternoon during lockdown, Joanne and I were doing street outreach around the Wellington CBD. We had some notifications to check on, and as we were walking back to base we came across a taumai who everyone at DCM had been trying to find during the week – we wanted to get him into the emergency accommodation (EH) that had been booked for him. With appropriate social distancing, Joanne and I were able to bundle him and his blankets up and to walk him about a kilometre up the road to the EH where he happily checked in. It helped that Joanne bought him some coffee, sugar and milk and promised him that she would deliver a food parcel to him the next day; this was enough incentive for him to stay. It was a job very well done, and at last we were able to head back to the office. Just before we got to Dixon Street who did we see, but another taumai who everyone at DCM had been looking for and trying to get into the accommodation. After a bit of convincing (and half of Joanne’s cheese scone – boy she’s good!!), he too turned around and followed us up to the accommodation and happily checked in. What a long, but successful day that one was! When the rest of the city goes in to lockdown, DCM and our NGO colleagues continue to fill the void that other agencies and businesses leave when they close their doors. For example, people can contact MSD case managers by phone, but what if you don’t have a phone or any money to buy one? People who have no fixed abode and lose their Eftpos cards can’t access their money because the banks are closed and so they cannot go into a bank to order a new card. Rather they would have to log in to internet banking (a barrier for most of the people we work with) and have a bank card sent to their address (another barrier for many taumai). In these real life lockdown examples, DCM has stepped in to give people cell phones with credit, and to organise for benefits to be sent to DCM’s MMS account and taumai given DCM Eftpos cards in the meantime, so they can access their money. We leave the safety of our own homes and safe bubbles, to continue to offer face to face, daily support for people who cannot access some basic human rights, because those who provide the services aren’t able to offer a solution that meets the needs of their most marginalised clients.” George Aro Mai Housing First team George and Jay load up the car with food parcels to be delivered to taumai during lockdown. “I joined the team at DCM in June, so I was still a fairly new team member when we went back in to lockdown. We were immediately paired up with a bubble partner; I was paired with Jay and the two of us worked together throughout the lockdown period. I would begin my working day by checking flags and emails, before heading out to pick up Jay. We always had one in the front and one in the back when we were together in a car. We would arrive at DCM at our allocated time to load our food parcels into the car. Jay and I would make a plan as to where we should head first – delivering food parcels, checking in on someone who is isolated, ensuring people have their money cards, or getting a phone to someone who doesn’t have one. I would drive, Jay would sit in the back and keep checking our list of addresses and phone numbers for the taumai who needed our support. We called taumai when we arrived or we knocked. People were so pleased to see us and thankful for the food and social contact. DCM had allocated a scribe for the day to each pair bubble, so we would phone our scribe and get them to type up any notes for us into the database, or do any research we needed done. Often extra things came up, like one man who we were delivering a food parcel to who told us he needed his prescription renewed. We were able to sort this over the phone.   When we were not going out to connect with taumai, we spent a lot of time working to get others into emergency housing. We connected people with the health and other supports they needed, supported them with budgeting and access to money, and found out things for them, like if they needed to go to court under level 3. We were involved in many meetings by Zoom. We were every bit as busy during lockdown as we would be on an average day at DCM, and we were able to provide the same level of support, safely – by being creative, committed and kind.” Delena Sustaining Tenancies team Delena is part of the Sustaining Tenancies team, working with vulnerable tenants at risk of falling back in to homelessness and delivering DCM’s community connections programme. Photo by Nikki Parlane. “During the lockdown period, DCM was divided into different bubbles. I enjoyed being in a bubble with Tabitha from the Aro Mai Housing First team. This was a great opportunity to get to know someone from another team. We would start our day by planning it out geographically – figure out who we needed to visit and where they lived to make things as smooth-sailing as possible. Food was definitely an important support for taumai during lockdown, and we were able to take food parcels to those who needed them, leaving them at their door. It can be a challenge for taumai to prepare their own meals. It’s not just the skills, but often they don’t have access to even basic items like can-openers. We had two taumai in their own bubble; I made it my mission to get them an appropriate food parcel so they could eat together. They have been a good example of how our taumai support one another, how important this has been during lockdown, and how a simple thing like preparing a meal together can give them such a sense of achievement. One other thing we discovered all over again was that our taumai were desperate for someone to talk to.  Some of them would be calling over and over again on the 0800 number, and we knew they needed the reassurance of a visit to settle them. We were able to speak with them at a safe distance during lockdown. It’s in their faces – you can always see in the eyes of our taumai how important the time we spend with them is to them.” Sophie Lead Dentist Sophie ran a dental session at DCM as soon as we moved back to Level 2, providing emergency treatment to those taumai who were in the most pain. “At any level of lockdown I am just on the other end of the phone. We can triage taumai's needs and from what is being described, I'll quickly be able to tell if they need an urgent appointment at the hospital or if we can put a band aid on in the form of antibiotics, until DCM is able to open again. Fortunately emailing prescriptions has been made much easier nowadays. And as soon as we were back at level 2, we dentists were able to get back to DCM to run emergency dental sessions for those in the most pain. Taumai have been absolutely amazing, working in with DCM's level 2 safety guidelines, and as always, the people we're seeing here don't have easy access to dental care. It is great to be back on site here at DCM where they feel comfortable.” Stephen Director, DCM Stephen and Paula were one of the pair bubbles who led on site sessions at DCM, working differently to ensure support could be provided to the most marginalised in a safe way. Photo by Nikki Parlane. “At DCM, we were one of the few organisations able to continue to support the most marginalised people in our city face to face during alert level 4. We know that our taumai are even more vulnerable and isolated at times like this. How do we respond as an essential service, when others have closed their doors? The great news is that taumai were able to engage with us on our 0800 number, with some in-person mahi delivered at a safe distance.  Another key focus for us has been to ensure taumai have access to the COVID vaccine. Offering the vaccine at DCM during alert level 4 was challenging, but also absolutely necessary. We know how very vulnerable these people are to the Delta variant.  And yesterday, we were able to offer a third vaccine day at DCM, with even more of the most vulnerable receiving their first or second dose of the vaccine. If there are any ways we at DCM can ensure taumai are not even more marginalised as a result of COVID and lockdowns, we will search them out and deliver them. This has always been DCM’s kaupapa, and is what we are all about. We know this is why so many of you support our mahi, and why you have stepped up again during lockdown 2021, donating money and food so that we can carry on.” The Wellington community Together we can end homelessness During lockdown, taumai like Mahir were so appreciative of the groceries we were able to leave for them on their doorsteps. Lockdown 2021 has again reminded us that the people of Wellington really do have our backs, and the backs of our taumai. A number of you have made donations to DCM during this time, to enable us to continue to do the mahi which members of the team have shared with you here. During the lockdown levels, DCM has provided far more food support to the most vulnerable people than we usually would – and as a result, our foodbank shelves have been emptied. Many of you have understood this, and stepped up to help. From the Freemasons Charity, the St John’s Trust Op Shop and St. John's in the City who provided extra dollars for us to purchase food, to New World Chaffers who, when they received a large order from us, provided all of the items as a donation. Ngaio Union Church opened their doors to people who wanted to donate food items for DCM to re-stock our foodbank; the two women seen here with minister Sue Brown travelled all the way from Miramar where the Grind Health & Fitness gym had organised a collection. Ka mau te wehi! Last weekend, our friends at Ngaio Union Church opened their doors for local people to bring in food donations to restock our shelves. Yes, Lockdown 2021 has provided many examples of how the Wellington community comes together to support DCM and the people we work with. If you would also like to help in this way, remember that you can donate groceries at any time to our foodbank bin at New World Chaffers, and that there are a number of different ways in which you can make donations to our work. <!-- --> *We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • August Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } "I chose to get vaccinated because..." Working together to protect taumai DCM and Te Aro Health Centre (TAHC) have a long history of working together to support the most marginalised people in our city. TAHC operates a satellite outreach clinic at DCM three mornings a week. Over the past month, a key joint focus has been on ensuring that these vulnerable people are protected against COVID-19. The importance of this was brought into even sharper focus when our second vaccine clinic at DCM had to be postponed due to New Zealand entering another Level 4 lockdown. But as has always been the case at DCM, we found a way to make this work – and were able to continue to vaccinate those who need it most at a second vaccine day during lockdown. Here DCM’s Director, Stephen Turnock, and TAHC Nurse Practitioner/Clinic Lead, Bronwyn Boele van Hensbroek-Miller, talk about their shared commitment to the people who DCM calls taumai*. Before our first DCM vaccine day, we had lots of kōrero with taumai, ensuring they had the information they needed and that all their questions were answered. Here Bronwyn and Stephen lead a COVID vaccine information session at DCM. Stephen: Here at DCM this month, we have been reflecting on human rights – the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person. As a nation, we have signed up to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, yet so many of the people DCM supports do not have access to these basic rights. Article 25 states that everyone has 'the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and wellbeing of himself and his family' – including medical care. Our partnership with Te Aro Health Centre (TAHC) is key to providing this care for the people who come through our doors. Bronwyn: Yes, at Te Aro Health, we believe that everyone has a right to maintain good health and to have access to high quality health services. We work to assist those in Wellington’s inner city, with low or no income, and with other barriers to accessing healthcare, to achieve and maintain good health. Our priority is to enrol those who are homeless, those with a history of drug and alcohol abuse and those who have a mental illness. It was a very different world when the first vaccine clinic was held at DCM pre-lockdown. Stephen: Having TAHC and a team of vaccinators offer the COVID-19 vaccine here at DCM has been great for taumai – for them, it's all about accessibility. Having the vaccine available at DCM where they feel comfortable, among people they trust, has been an important factor. Last year, during our first lockdown, Bronwyn and her team went out alongside DCM kaimahi to connect with taumai in emergency housing, offering flu shots and health support. Every week, they are here at DCM, seeing taumai and addressing any health needs they may have: from long-term health issues through to injuries, rapid testing and treatment for hepatitis, and of course their mental health needs. And when we were again not able to open at DCM in Lukes Lane during this month’s Level 4 lockdown, TAHC continued to offer their support including COVID tests from their own health rooms nearby. In the weeks preceding our vaccine days at DCM, we have spoken with taumai, answered their questions and heard them share their own reasons for getting vaccinated. For our first vaccine day, we offered transport to DCM for those who needed it, so that they could receive their vaccine. We provided kai, community and waiata to taumai as they waited with us for 20 minutes after their vaccine. And after this time, we cheered for each person as they left, thanking them for the part they have played in keeping themselves, their whānau and all of us – their community – safe. Bronwyn: And then when we found ourselves in another lockdown, we worked together to find a way to continue vaccinating safely. TAHC enormously values the collaboration we have with DCM so it was great that last week we were again able to offer vaccines at DCM under Level 4 – masked up and safely spaced – enabling dozens of taumai to receive their first dose, and many their second. Rough sleepers who have been very reluctant to be vaccinated came forward and showed such courage. They are doing their part, just as so many other New Zealanders are. Yes, this is just one more example of how we can support the health and wellbeing of the most vulnerable people in our community when we all work together. Last week, taumai were able to safely access a COVID vaccine at DCM under Level 4 thanks to Bronwyn and her team. 24 received their second doses, while 56 received their first. At this challenging time, DCM was also able to support them in other ways. One very vulnerable man received his vaccine, and then we were able to arrange emergency housing for him. <!-- --> "I chose to get vaccinated because..." Our director Stephen led the way and was the first member of team DCM to get vaccinated. "I chose to get vaccinated to not only protect myself and my whānau but also to protect my community and those I interact with on a daily basis. As a middle-aged Māori, I also recognise that we have an increased risk of infection, hospitalisation and death. Therefore if my choice to be vaccinated results in more health resources available for others in need...Tu meke!!!" Some of our kaimahi received their vaccine at DCM – to inspire taumai to get their vaccine too. Delena (Mama Dee) is a member of team DCM who heads out to community centres as part of DCM’s community connections mahi: “I chose to get vaccinated in order to become a safer member of my community – I did it for my whānau, my colleagues at DCM, and the wider community.” Fiona is one of DCM's kaiawhina (peer support workers). She received her vaccine here at DCM alongside taumai. "I chose to be vaccinated because I care about our whānau – both those we support here in this special community which is DCM, and my whānau down south. It was in the back of my mind for a while, but being able to get the vaccine here at DCM – well, it was a no-brainer." Manu was the first of many taumai to receive the COVID vaccine at DCM. "Why did I choose to get vaccinated? I have been coming to DCM for 16 years. It takes 10 years to get to know me! But now I feel comfortable here because I know you all, and you know me. And I was reminded of a verse – 'Evening passed and morning came'. We have all been through some tough times, but now there is something we can do for ourselves and for others." Nicole was also one of the first to line up for a vaccine at DCM. "I chose to get vaccinated because I'm pregnant and I want to protect my baby." Some taumai shared beautiful reflections with us. One man told us: "I know that my ancestors have got my back. I just imagined, 'what if I got COVID and took it back to my marae?' I couldn't face my ancestors... So I looked up to the sky and thought, 'we got this'." <!-- --> Supporting the most marginalised during lockdown DCM kaimahi have been working in designated pair "bubbles", to keep everyone safe. Here George and Jay are all loaded up and ready to hit the road, delivering much needed food support to taumai. At alert Level 4, we have not been able to invite taumai to spend time with us here at DCM, or to meet with them out in the community centres near to their homes when they are housed. However as always, DCM has remained committed to supporting the most marginalised in many different ways. Taumai can get hold of us on a dedicated 0800 number and phones are again available for those who need them. The Outreach team has been heading out on the streets to connect with rough sleepers, while the Aro Mai Housing First and Sustaining Tenancies teams continue to provide a wide range of services to taumai throughout the Wellington region, ensuring they are well connected and supported during this difficult time. Food has been dropped on the doorstep for those who need it most, and emergency housing arranged for those without shelter. Our teams have also been calling taumai to check in with them and see how they are doing. Taumai often tell us that it is this contact and kōrero that they value most; lockdown is a very lonely time for many. If you would like to make a donation to support DCM’s work at this challenging time, go to our website – together, we are doing something very special. Te Riria works from home receiving calls from taumai on our 0800 number (left); taumai like Mahir have been able to receive food support, dropped off on their doorstep by DCM kaimahi (right). <!-- --> *We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    • July Update from DCM - together we can end homelessness
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line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } "DCM helped me get into a house, and they are helping me to stay in the house." Happy Matariki This month we have been celebrating Matariki, the Māori New Year, at DCM. This is a time to reflect on the past, celebrate the present and plan for the future. We came together for our Matariki Seasonal Kai, an opportunity for kaimahi to connect with taumai* during the cold days of winter, and to enjoy a very special hangi. Taumai wrote some beautiful reflections in a book that we gifted to the Tristram whānau, who make this meal possible. Smurf shared his poem: You may remember Smurf from our recent film clip; he first connected with DCM when he was rough sleeping in 2014. He has seen a dentist, audiologist and physiotherapist at DCM, regularly attended Te Hāpai and worked with Te Aro Health around his health needs. In 2020 he was housed by our Aro Mai Housing First team. We're very proud of the progress he has made on his journey to wellbeing. As he himself reflects, "DCM helped me get into a house, and they are helping me to stay in the house. I don't think I would have got healthy if I wasn't housed." <!-- --> How can New Zealand solve its social housing crisis? DCM Director Stephen Turnock with Associate Minister of Housing Marama Davidson This month DCM featured in an article in the UK newspaper, the Guardian, about homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand: “Once a world leader in social housing, New Zealand now faces what the UN has called a “human rights crisis”. Although the government is pouring money in, the waitlist for social housing has ballooned to 23,000 – triple that of three years ago – and there are more than 4,000 children living in motels. The government has repeatedly said it is rectifying a problem it inherited from the former National government, which saw the sell-off of state housing and underinvestment in social housing. The prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, told local media in January the government would leave “no stone unturned” to fix the problem. But groups working to end homelessness say despite those good intentions it could be years before those at the sharp end of the crisis are permanently housed. DCM, a Wellington organisation that helps rough sleepers find housing, has had a rise in the number of people with highly complex needs seeking its services, its outreach manager Natalia Cleland says. Often they are people who have come up against barriers trying to access state-run social housing. Nearly $1m a day is being paid in grants to more than 8,000 people requiring emergency accommodation. Motels are often used to house people for short periods and have been widely criticised as being unsafe and unsanitary. That money would be better spent on permanent housing, Cleland says. “It’s a tricky thing for the government to hold, because on the one hand we don’t want people sleeping rough or living in cars. For them to be inside and have a bathroom and power they can turn on is better than those scenarios. But the money being spent on that could be spent on permanent housing.” The housing crisis is affecting people “across the continuum”, DCM’s director Stephen Turnock says, adding that those who are chronically homeless struggle the most to get a home. The government of New Zealand has poured money into building social housing but the pace has so far been slow. It is a complex and nebulous problem that could take years to solve, Turnock says, and the crucial fix is more housing supply across the board: “[The government’s] vision is bold enough but the ability to pull all the necessary levers in unison is a very difficult task.” He puts the slow pace of new builds down to high construction costs, complicated and restrictive land and housing regulation, a shortfall in construction workers and skyrocketing prices for existing properties. DCM has permanently housed 82 chronically homeless people in Wellington using the Housing First model – which prioritises finding permanent homes for the homeless before addressing other needs such as drug counselling – but has 120 on its waiting list and there are no houses available. DCM finds most of its Housing First properties through the private market, rather than through the government’s housing agency Kainga Ora, and increasingly finds it is competing with Kainga Ora and other housing providers to rent homes. “We are all in the same sandpit together, and the sandpit is not big enough,” Turnock says." Would you like to know more about how you can provide a home for people who are experiencing homelessness? Do you have friends, contacts or networks who would like to be part of this? Stephen would love to hear from you, and to speak more with you about this. You can contact him at director@dcm.org.nz <!-- -->