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    • June Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness
      • 96 June Update from DCM - Together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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font-size:12px; line-height:150%; text-align:center; } .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Clifton shares his story and we hear from Hapi again.  About Us Contact Clifton’s Story “I love being part of a major change in people’s lives.” Ko Clifton tōku ingoa. I was born in Wellington but lived in Ōpōtiki for the first 13 years of my life. I was raised by my Koro and Nanny in a whole house full of cousins and aunties and uncles. We grew up on the family farm. They had 14 children, so we were never without whānau around us. My favourite thing to do growing up was to ride my horse with my brother and cousins, down to the river for a swim or up the bush for a hunt, just exploring. My mother spent most of her time in Australia and down in Wellington. Then, out of nowhere, when I was 12 years old she turned up, and my brother and I went to live with her in Wellington. I have worked in a number of different jobs over the years. I started off in the family taxi office in Miramar as soon as I left Rongotai College. I have worked in the sugar cane fields of Fiji; I have had work with other whānau up in Ōpōtiki in kiwifruit orchards. Back in the early 2000s I worked for a time as a forklift operator. I was working for Fletcher Construction when the first lockdown began. When all the work stopped, I lost my job and my income. I was trapped in Wellington with no whānau support and nowhere to stay. I had to move into emergency accommodation. Clifton volunteered his time to support the DCM Foodbank Appeal in May. When was the first time I heard about DCM? It was during that first lockdown, and I was at AC International. There were three of us in the one room; myself and my two adult daughters. I saw a pamphlet about DCM, and gave them a call. Steph answered. I think originally I was asking for food, for a food parcel. It was a proper lockdown, and DCM was only open at very specific times. Steph told me to come down on the Wednesday morning, and I did. I told Steph that there were three of us in the same room. She said “we can’t have that” and got straight on to it. Paula arranged for us to move to two rooms at Halswell. My room number was Room 24, I remember that clearly. I was in one room, and the two girls were in the other. Once I was settled in at Halswell, Kat and Peni from DCM came over to speak to me – about getting housed! They spoke to me about finding the right place. I told them about the issues I had had, with places in certain suburbs where family and others from my past would come by. It was not so good. We agreed that I needed an apartment where others couldn’t just come in to my whare, and that it needed to be in the city. And it sure was meant to be! They offered me, Clifton, a place on Clifton Terrace! And I moved in – on 31 August 2020. Clifton with George on Super Saturday vaccine day. DCM supports people like me in so many ways. Not just with housing and food parcels, but I have also seen the audiologist, the dentist and the Te Aro Health nurses. I have been vaccinated at DCM – I had my first two shots there, and went off myself to get my booster. When I was in emergency housing, I would regularly come to Te Hāpai to get out and about and away from emergency housing for a while. I was always made welcome; the DCM kaimahi were genuinely interested in getting to know me, and hearing what my own hopes and dreams were. It was one of the DCM team, Dom, who supported and encouraged me to stop smoking. And then, a month after I moved in to my place, Kat asked me if I would like to work at DCM. I knew Fabian, and I had wondered how he came to get a job at DCM. The next step was for me to be part of one of the Peer Support courses which DCM offers to people who are interested in a kaiāwhina* role. No sooner was that done, than Kat came back to see me. She helped me with my CV and a cover letter. Then I had an interview at DCM – with Natalia and Paula. They asked me what sort of work I was interested in. I said I would love to work with the Outreach team, and they immediately agreed. They listened to me, to what I was keen to do. It was the ultimate miracle. Clifton is always looking out for ways to support others. He has stepped up to help all of DCM’s teams at one time or another. He enjoys working with Evan to deliver the Te Awatea programme (left) and participating in DCM training and team-building days (with Moses, Bella and Michelle at right). Since then, I have got to be involved right across the many areas of DCM’s mahi. I am part of the Outreach team, but I have also been out with Arieta, Adriana and George from DCM’s Aro Mai Housing First team and with Nadeeka to support our Sustaining Tenancies mahi. I have worked in Te Hāpai, and on DCM’s Te Awatea programme. I have been part of the team delivering our Community Connections programme. I was even at the very first session when we launched the programme at Newlands. I love the patience and resilience of DCM. We roll with it. When taumai are ready, we go forward with them. If they are not ready today, we will try again tomorrow. There are endless chances. We won’t give up on you. And now, I have been able to add more mahi in to my week. I have also joined the Take 10 team, working with youth. On a Saturday night, we are out from 9pm–4am in the city, connecting to young people, checking that they are safe, even paying for them to get an Uber home when this is what needs to happen. We offer water, sweets, etc., to get the young people to connect with us so that we can check in with them. All the DCM taumai seem to go by! They greet me, wonder what I am doing there. The way DCM has stepped up during this pandemic has been ever so encouraging and inspiring. They have come up with ways of supporting those who need it most, regardless of the traffic light system or regular lockdowns. That’s what separates DCM from other community services – the constancy of our level of passion for the work we do. It has been exceptionally impressive – the aroha and manaakitanga I have experienced and have seen others experience over my time at DCM – first as taumai, and now as a kaimahi. Clifton with his team leader, Natalia, outside DCM in Lukes Lane. Natalia Clifton is the type of person who will do anything for anyone. He is generous with his time, cares about his colleagues and keeps his eyes and ears open for ways that he can help people. Clifton also loves learning. It’s one of his great strengths – he listens, watches, and then tries something himself. He also asks for feedback from colleagues which shows great strength of character and humility. He is always open to doing things differently or better. Clifton has covered so much work for DCM including supporting us on outreach visits, running manaakitanga in Te Hāpai, coaching new kaiāwhina, moving furniture for taumai who have become housed, supporting community connections mahi, and sharing his own story in Te Awatea to help the taumai open up and share their story. He’s probably the only DCM staff member who has worked across all services and all teams. How would I describe Clifton? He is collaborative, humble, kind, patient and always supportive. Of both his colleagues – those he works alongside here at DCM – and of taumai. Clifton is always ready to lend a helping hand – whether it is cleaning up the hall after one of DCM’s Community Connections afternoons (left) or staying behind with Fiona after DCM’s last AGM to do the dishes and tidy up (right). <!-- --> Hapi In January, we introduced you to Hapi and shared his story. Hapi is a creative and sociable man who is thriving in his new home, a house provided by private landlord Dev. Hapi loves his art, and this month, some of his pieces have featured in a very successful exhibition organised by MIX, a mental health service which offers programmes in art and wellbeing. Hapi’s work has been popular, with more than half of the items he has prepared for the exhibition selling on opening night alone. Here’s what Hapi has to say about what art means to him: “Bro, it frees my mind. It frees me. I’m free! I'm free and I don’t have no other thoughts about anything else, but just go for my own things. Do my own style of work. I feel awesome when I make anything that I know that I can do, or whatever vision comes in my mind. I just lay it out how it is. What really makes me feel good is other people love it.” You can hear Hapi speak about his art for yourself, in this brief film clip: <!-- --> Support DCM *DCM uses the term kaiāwhina, meaning a helper or advocate for those staff who bring lived experience to their mahi at DCM. We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well. Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi. With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive. <!-- --> Copyright © 2022 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
      • Accepted from DCM alerts archive by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • miramar
      • newlands
      • covid-19
      • exhibitions
      • Newlands, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, New Zealand/Aotearoa (OpenStreetMap)


    • Asbestos as an excuse
      • You may have heard the Wellington City Council saying recently that protesters must leave their occupation at Shelly Bay because of health and safety concerns over the presence of asbestos in a building near the occupation site. Twelve years after this land was transferred from Defence into open public use, and 12 months after the occupation began, the WCC staff suddenly discovered an urgent asbestos health and safety issue. They sent the protesters 24 hours notice of the land being closed and having to leave.
      • Accepted from Inside Wellington feed by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • miramar
      • shelly-bay
      • Shelly Bay, Shelly Bay Road, Maupuia, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Review: Poprox Improv
      •   Poprox Improv is the brainchild of a bunch of Wellington theatre stalwarts: Pippa Drakeford-Croad, Dylan Hutton, Austin Harrison, Nina Hogg, Jonny Paul & Nino Raphael, and it is a show absolutely worthy of their talent. Performed for the first time this night at Miramar’s gorgeous new performance venue – Roxy Live (a glorious new space […]
      • Accepted from Wellingtonista Blog Feed by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • miramar
      • theatre
      • Roxy Cinema, 5, Park Road, Miramar, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6242, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Is WCC abandoning the community on the airport?
      • In a post earlier this year, I talked about Wellington Airport’s plan to expand over Miramar’s golf course. This week, as the world painfully tried to reach an agreement in Glasgow, I wrote about the community groups trying to oppose this antiquated project. The Wellington City Council owns a third of the airport and as such, needs to support decisions in the airport’s best interests. But WCC must also support the community’s best interests. It is stuck between a rock and hard place, a situation which will not solve itself anytime soon with the recent decision to not sell its share in the airport.
      • Accepted from Inside Wellington feed by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • miramar
      • runway-extension
      • wcc
      • Miramar, Wellington, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • A story of David and Goliath
      • Earlier this year, WCC organised a public hearing about Wellington Airport’plans to expand over the Miramar golf course. Whether you are a keen golfer or not, the fact the airport thought a plane park was the best use of this land, in a climate and housing crisis, was shocking. Greed, unlike the land where the airport is located, does not know any limit, so the airport is trying to push through its expansion.
      • Accepted from Inside Wellington feed by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • miramar
      • runway-extension
      • Miramar Golf Course, Airport Bus Stop Walkway, Rongotai, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6242, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021
      • 96 Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021 p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; 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background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:50% 50%; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:54px; padding-bottom:54px; } .headerContainer{ background-color:transparent; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:0; padding-bottom:0; } .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ color:#757575; font-family:Helvetica; font-size:16px; line-height:150%; text-align:left; } .headerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#007C89; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } #templateBody{ background-color:#transparent; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; background-position:center; background-size:cover; border-top:0; border-bottom:0; padding-top:27px; padding-bottom:54px; } .bodyContainer{ background-color:#transparent; background-image:none; background-repeat:no-repeat; 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} .footerContainer .mcnTextContent a,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p a{ color:#FFFFFF; font-weight:normal; text-decoration:underline; } @media only screen and (min-width:768px){ .templateContainer{ width:600px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body,table,td,p,a,li,blockquote{ -webkit-text-size-adjust:none !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ body{ width:100% !important; min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnRetinaImage{ max-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImage{ width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCartContainer,.mcnCaptionTopContent,.mcnRecContentContainer,.mcnCaptionBottomContent,.mcnTextContentContainer,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer,.mcnImageGroupContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightTextContentContainer,.mcnCaptionLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnCaptionRightImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightTextContentContainer,.mcnImageCardLeftImageContentContainer,.mcnImageCardRightImageContentContainer{ max-width:100% !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer{ min-width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupContent{ padding:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCaptionLeftContentOuter .mcnTextContent,.mcnCaptionRightContentOuter .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardTopImageContent,.mcnCaptionBottomContent:last-child .mcnCaptionBottomImageContent,.mcnCaptionBlockInner .mcnCaptionTopContent:last-child .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardBottomImageContent{ padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockInner{ padding-top:0 !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockOuter{ padding-top:9px !important; padding-bottom:9px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Lockdown 2021 has seen us working together once again to ensure that the most marginalised are supported at this challenging time. Lifting up the most marginalised during Lockdown 2021 Just as we did in 2020, Lockdown 2021 has seen us working together once again, to ensure that the most marginalised are supported at this challenging time. From DCM kaimahi, to our team of health professionals, to our wonderful supporters - here members of team DCM talk about their work supporting the most marginalised during the latest lockdown. Natalia Outreach team Natalia and Joanne headed out on outreach together during lockdown. “We had a pair on outreach every day during lockdown, following up on notifications sent to us from the council or the public. We had way more notifications in the three weeks at levels 3 and 4 than we had had in the previous entire month. During lockdown, everyone on team DCM works together, doing whatever it takes to support taumai* during these challenging times. Members of our Outreach team have manned the 0800 number, been scribe support for kaimahi who were on the ground, supported on-site sessions, and delivered food and welfare checks, all on top of following up on notifications. Members of other teams have also gone out with us when we have needed support. Joanne has been a fantastic member of team DCM for some years now; she is currently part of the Aro Mai Housing First team out at the Hutt. One afternoon during lockdown, Joanne and I were doing street outreach around the Wellington CBD. We had some notifications to check on, and as we were walking back to base we came across a taumai who everyone at DCM had been trying to find during the week – we wanted to get him into the emergency accommodation (EH) that had been booked for him. With appropriate social distancing, Joanne and I were able to bundle him and his blankets up and to walk him about a kilometre up the road to the EH where he happily checked in. It helped that Joanne bought him some coffee, sugar and milk and promised him that she would deliver a food parcel to him the next day; this was enough incentive for him to stay. It was a job very well done, and at last we were able to head back to the office. Just before we got to Dixon Street who did we see, but another taumai who everyone at DCM had been looking for and trying to get into the accommodation. After a bit of convincing (and half of Joanne’s cheese scone – boy she’s good!!), he too turned around and followed us up to the accommodation and happily checked in. What a long, but successful day that one was! When the rest of the city goes in to lockdown, DCM and our NGO colleagues continue to fill the void that other agencies and businesses leave when they close their doors. For example, people can contact MSD case managers by phone, but what if you don’t have a phone or any money to buy one? People who have no fixed abode and lose their Eftpos cards can’t access their money because the banks are closed and so they cannot go into a bank to order a new card. Rather they would have to log in to internet banking (a barrier for most of the people we work with) and have a bank card sent to their address (another barrier for many taumai). In these real life lockdown examples, DCM has stepped in to give people cell phones with credit, and to organise for benefits to be sent to DCM’s MMS account and taumai given DCM Eftpos cards in the meantime, so they can access their money. We leave the safety of our own homes and safe bubbles, to continue to offer face to face, daily support for people who cannot access some basic human rights, because those who provide the services aren’t able to offer a solution that meets the needs of their most marginalised clients.” George Aro Mai Housing First team George and Jay load up the car with food parcels to be delivered to taumai during lockdown. “I joined the team at DCM in June, so I was still a fairly new team member when we went back in to lockdown. We were immediately paired up with a bubble partner; I was paired with Jay and the two of us worked together throughout the lockdown period. I would begin my working day by checking flags and emails, before heading out to pick up Jay. We always had one in the front and one in the back when we were together in a car. We would arrive at DCM at our allocated time to load our food parcels into the car. Jay and I would make a plan as to where we should head first – delivering food parcels, checking in on someone who is isolated, ensuring people have their money cards, or getting a phone to someone who doesn’t have one. I would drive, Jay would sit in the back and keep checking our list of addresses and phone numbers for the taumai who needed our support. We called taumai when we arrived or we knocked. People were so pleased to see us and thankful for the food and social contact. DCM had allocated a scribe for the day to each pair bubble, so we would phone our scribe and get them to type up any notes for us into the database, or do any research we needed done. Often extra things came up, like one man who we were delivering a food parcel to who told us he needed his prescription renewed. We were able to sort this over the phone.   When we were not going out to connect with taumai, we spent a lot of time working to get others into emergency housing. We connected people with the health and other supports they needed, supported them with budgeting and access to money, and found out things for them, like if they needed to go to court under level 3. We were involved in many meetings by Zoom. We were every bit as busy during lockdown as we would be on an average day at DCM, and we were able to provide the same level of support, safely – by being creative, committed and kind.” Delena Sustaining Tenancies team Delena is part of the Sustaining Tenancies team, working with vulnerable tenants at risk of falling back in to homelessness and delivering DCM’s community connections programme. Photo by Nikki Parlane. “During the lockdown period, DCM was divided into different bubbles. I enjoyed being in a bubble with Tabitha from the Aro Mai Housing First team. This was a great opportunity to get to know someone from another team. We would start our day by planning it out geographically – figure out who we needed to visit and where they lived to make things as smooth-sailing as possible. Food was definitely an important support for taumai during lockdown, and we were able to take food parcels to those who needed them, leaving them at their door. It can be a challenge for taumai to prepare their own meals. It’s not just the skills, but often they don’t have access to even basic items like can-openers. We had two taumai in their own bubble; I made it my mission to get them an appropriate food parcel so they could eat together. They have been a good example of how our taumai support one another, how important this has been during lockdown, and how a simple thing like preparing a meal together can give them such a sense of achievement. One other thing we discovered all over again was that our taumai were desperate for someone to talk to.  Some of them would be calling over and over again on the 0800 number, and we knew they needed the reassurance of a visit to settle them. We were able to speak with them at a safe distance during lockdown. It’s in their faces – you can always see in the eyes of our taumai how important the time we spend with them is to them.” Sophie Lead Dentist Sophie ran a dental session at DCM as soon as we moved back to Level 2, providing emergency treatment to those taumai who were in the most pain. “At any level of lockdown I am just on the other end of the phone. We can triage taumai's needs and from what is being described, I'll quickly be able to tell if they need an urgent appointment at the hospital or if we can put a band aid on in the form of antibiotics, until DCM is able to open again. Fortunately emailing prescriptions has been made much easier nowadays. And as soon as we were back at level 2, we dentists were able to get back to DCM to run emergency dental sessions for those in the most pain. Taumai have been absolutely amazing, working in with DCM's level 2 safety guidelines, and as always, the people we're seeing here don't have easy access to dental care. It is great to be back on site here at DCM where they feel comfortable.” Stephen Director, DCM Stephen and Paula were one of the pair bubbles who led on site sessions at DCM, working differently to ensure support could be provided to the most marginalised in a safe way. Photo by Nikki Parlane. “At DCM, we were one of the few organisations able to continue to support the most marginalised people in our city face to face during alert level 4. We know that our taumai are even more vulnerable and isolated at times like this. How do we respond as an essential service, when others have closed their doors? The great news is that taumai were able to engage with us on our 0800 number, with some in-person mahi delivered at a safe distance.  Another key focus for us has been to ensure taumai have access to the COVID vaccine. Offering the vaccine at DCM during alert level 4 was challenging, but also absolutely necessary. We know how very vulnerable these people are to the Delta variant.  And yesterday, we were able to offer a third vaccine day at DCM, with even more of the most vulnerable receiving their first or second dose of the vaccine. If there are any ways we at DCM can ensure taumai are not even more marginalised as a result of COVID and lockdowns, we will search them out and deliver them. This has always been DCM’s kaupapa, and is what we are all about. We know this is why so many of you support our mahi, and why you have stepped up again during lockdown 2021, donating money and food so that we can carry on.” The Wellington community Together we can end homelessness During lockdown, taumai like Mahir were so appreciative of the groceries we were able to leave for them on their doorsteps. Lockdown 2021 has again reminded us that the people of Wellington really do have our backs, and the backs of our taumai. A number of you have made donations to DCM during this time, to enable us to continue to do the mahi which members of the team have shared with you here. During the lockdown levels, DCM has provided far more food support to the most vulnerable people than we usually would – and as a result, our foodbank shelves have been emptied. Many of you have understood this, and stepped up to help. From the Freemasons Charity, the St John’s Trust Op Shop and St. John's in the City who provided extra dollars for us to purchase food, to New World Chaffers who, when they received a large order from us, provided all of the items as a donation. Ngaio Union Church opened their doors to people who wanted to donate food items for DCM to re-stock our foodbank; the two women seen here with minister Sue Brown travelled all the way from Miramar where the Grind Health & Fitness gym had organised a collection. Ka mau te wehi! Last weekend, our friends at Ngaio Union Church opened their doors for local people to bring in food donations to restock our shelves. Yes, Lockdown 2021 has provided many examples of how the Wellington community comes together to support DCM and the people we work with. If you would also like to help in this way, remember that you can donate groceries at any time to our foodbank bin at New World Chaffers, and that there are a number of different ways in which you can make donations to our work. <!-- --> *We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we set out on together – to become settled, stable and well.   Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2021 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
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      • Ngaio, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Rethinking the airport barrier
      • Despite being surrounded by high hills, Wellington is fortunate to have an international airport that is under 10km from its CBD, with flight approaches over Cook Strait to the south and just missing the Newland hills to the north. The drawback is the runway which forms a major physical barrier over 2km long between the city and the airport terminal and the growing population of over 20,000 residents who live east of the airport on Miramar Peninsula.
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    • Cafe Polo Miramar
      • Cafe Polo brings you honest, homemade seasonal food with a welcoming local bistro- style of service. Named for the nearby historic Miramar Polo Grounds, Cafe Polo looks back to slower times to produce food made with care and the freshest ingredients, for enjoying with friends and family. We hope you make Cafe Polo your 'local'.
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    • Miramar Golf Club
      • Miramar Golf Club has been at the present site on the Miramar Peninsula since August 1908 and has become a championship golf course close to Wellington City.
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      • Miramar Golf Course, Airport Bus Stop Walkway, Rongotai, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6242, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


    • Miramar Links
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      • We are a friendly and welcoming faith community based in Miramar, Wellington, New Zealand. We are a small and diverse congregation which we expect to grow. Please feel free to explore our website to learn a bit more about who we are and what we do.
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      • Roxy Cinema, 5, Park Road, Miramar, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6242, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


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