Related Tags

St John's in the City items have been tagged with:

Tags

St John's in the City

A Wellington inner-city Presbyterian Church.

  • Tagged as:
  • religiousgroups
  • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)

    Just St John's in the City

    St John's in the City newsitems

      • St John’s Church strengthening project update
        • 18 Aug 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • We have now completed the strengthening project and celebrated our reopening on 9 August 2020. We’ve raised $3.2 million towards the cost of doing this. We have also carried out maintenance that was only discovered when the building was opened up (in some cases for the first time since it was built).
        • Automatically tagged as:
        • religiousgroups
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • A response to the Destiny Church: applying Christian ethics in a time of pandemic - Rev Allister Lane
        • 17 May 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Last week Brian Tamaki vowed to hold a Destiny service this Sunday in defiance of the decision by the Government to continue the ban on large gatherings under Alert Level 2. Tamaki urged other churches to join him (see Stuff Article). Many of us will have our own instincts in responding to the pandemic, with varying appetites for social controls and government guidelines. So, as well as assessing the risks of the virus, how do we assess how we do ‘the right thing’? What should guide us in whether we side with the opinion of Destiny Church, or not? Christian ethics offer resources for us at this time, to know how best to respond as individuals, as churches, as communities, being attentive to what really matters. Here are five points of Christian ethics for us to consider in how we respond to the pandemic. The sanctity of human life Truth telling Social justice Church Witness in the world Government. Each of these is consider in more detail below as an offering toward a moral framework to help respond well in a time of pandemic. 1. The sanctity of human life. God has shown through scripture and the incarnation of Jesus that human beings have sacred worth. Given this understanding of the inviolable sacredness of human life, there is an imperative for us to protect human life. This value of human life is linked to love of neighbour. In Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan, we are invited to consider what this means with regard to responding to the physical health, safety and well-being of the stranger (Luke 10:25-37). In his book Kingdom Ethics, David Gushee states “Love sees with compassion and enters into the situation of persons in bondage.” (David P. Gushee, Kingdom Ethics (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016), 204. ) The life and teaching of Jesus has shaped our understanding of prioritizing human health, and influenced the medicine and nursing vocations in caring for the sick, disabled and dying. Because Christians value the sanctity of human life, we strive to minimize any threat that destroys human life. We have all been presented with the evidence of the risks of large gatherings and how they unduly danger the lives and health of our neighbours. 2. Truth telling. A commitment to truthfulness is recognised as a hallmark of humility and forgiveness exercised in Christian discipleship. An openness to recognising the evidence and facing reality, in a way that allows our perceptions to be changed, is necessary in the pursuit of truth and the sharing of truth. We can therefore support the provision of clear and transparent information that offers guidance for making informed decisions. Insofar as the New Zealand Government and Health officials have offered clear and direct guidelines for mitigating the risks of the pandemic by limiting large gatherings, Christians should take this into account. 3. Social justice Scripture shows that human freedom is important to maintain. But human freedom is not ‘individualistic moral authority’ ( Gushee, Kingdom Ethics, 209) , rather it thrives when we live with love toward others by fostering compassionate justice. We must always recognise and advance the freedom of the other. In scripture justice is always ‘from below’, showing consideration and caring for the most vulnerable among us. Justice is only full when it includes justice for those who are the least in society. A pandemic affects everybody, but does not affect everybody equally. Our response must pay special attention therefore to those who are most vulnerable. Covid-19 is particularly dangerous and deadly to those among us who are elderly and have underlying health issues. Christians must therefore have particular regard for these vulnerable people among us. 4. Church Witness in the world Jesus says to his followers “…you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” (Acts 1:8) The witness of the Church is to point to the person of Jesus as God’s revelation of truth, justice and compassion. What does the Church look and sound like when getting all grouchy and demanding our rights? Civil disobedience can be noble, and has been part of campaigns by Christians for standing up for what is right, but whose interests are we protecting? If we are witnesses to Christ, our actions will align with the interests of the least powerful and influential; we will demonstrate Christ’s love for those who may be otherwise overlooked by society. The Church exists for the sake of the world, and therefore its primary concern is not the preservation of its own internal activity. 5. Government. As part of Christian ethics, the Church must consider what is the ‘right’ relationship to hold with the Government. This needs to be assessed according to the system of government and the particular governing authorities of the time. In scripture we hear the deliberately subversive teaching of Jesus, who stated “render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s” (Mark 12:13-17; Matthew 22:15-22; Luke 20:20-26). Jesus distanced himself from the Roman power structure and tax system that oppressed the poor, and cultivated idolatry. Christians live in a tension that recognises the appropriate role of the governing authorities, while giving ultimate loyalty to God as citizens of heaven (Philippians 3:20). Importantly, the prohibition on large gatherings is not a prohibition of worship. Indeed, most churches are creatively using multiple forms of technology to continue worshipping. Therefore the ban on large gatherings for the sake of the common good is part of the appropriate role of the governing authorities – it is part of ‘the things that are Caesar’s’! Conclusion These five points of Christian ethics are offered to assist us in adequately considering how we best respond to the pandemic. They are guidance for us, as we try to do the right thing. These points are offered as a contribution toward a robust moral framework that helps us assess particular actions, decisions, proposals and priorities. But, we also need to maintain a gracious disposition toward others – especially those immediately around us. Let us not be too quick to condemn. With grace as our guide, we can assume the best in others, discover the way forward together and default to human solidarity – just as Jesus shows us. With thanks for the input of Dr Derek Woodard-Lehman and the group members of the St John’s Daily Devotion Together.
        • Accepted from News - St John's in the City Presbyterian Church 2 months ago by tonytw1
        • Tagged as:
        • covid-19
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • Aitken Memorial Window - St John’s in the City Earthquake Strengthening Fund
        • 15 Apr 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > As of 26 June 2020 Do you want to sponsor a panel of the Aitken Memorial Window as a donation towards the Earthquake Strengthening Fund? Sponsorship can be $250, $500, or $1,000 amounts. For a contribution please follow the instructions below:Bank Account Number:  02 0500 0021908 01Reference: WindowAmount of sponsorship: $________________ and email the church office at enquiries@stjohnsinthecity.org.nz with your details so a receipt can be issued or if you want your name to appear on the panel that you have sponsored.
        • Accepted from News - St John's in the City Presbyterian Church 2 months ago by tonytw1
        • Tagged as:
        • earthquake-strengthening
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • Remember me (Part 2)
        • 29 Feb 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • Sermon by Rev Stuart Simpson on 23 February 2020 Readings were Isaiah 46:3-4 and Matthew 4:18-22 Download this sermon as a PDF Last week I shared with you some thoughts and reflections on dementia, which was based from a summer paper I took called The practical theology of mental health presented by Professor John Swinton.
        • Accepted from St Johns in the City sermons 9 months ago by feedreader
        • Automatically tagged as:
        • religiousgroups
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • Remember me (Part 1)
        • 29 Feb 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • Sermon by Rev Stuart Simpson on 16 February 2020 Readings were Psalm 139: 1-12 and Luke 23:39-43 Download this sermon as a PDF During the holidays I enrolled in a summer school course in Dunedin called the Practical Theology of Mental Health, which was run through the Theological Department of Otago University.
        • Accepted from St Johns in the City sermons 9 months ago by feedreader
        • Automatically tagged as:
        • religiousgroups
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • Who in the world are we?
        • 29 Feb 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • Sermon by Rev Allister Lane on 9 February 2020 Readings were Matthew 5:13-16 and 1 Corinthians 2: 1-5 Download this sermon as a PDF If there is one consolation I feel about all the work going on with the roads outside – with all the disruption, inconvenience, noise (and smell!) – I’m just really glad WE aren’t having to pay for it all! It must be costing a lot, and we know about the cost of getting things sorted and future-proofed! There has been anxiety for us, however. The streets closest to us are closed; the disruption is massive. And there is still uncertainty about when it will all be put right. It compromises access to Church, and there is a risk that for some they are simply unable to physically gather for worship and other activities here. We know it is necessary work, but at times, it feels all this disruption is a metaphor for the Church in New Zealand. I wouldn’t go as far as saying the Church is being directly targeted or attacked, but the Church in New Zealand increasingly finds itself cut-off, isolated and marginalised. The Church in New Zealand used to have a more central and influential role in society. But we can no longer assume this, and sometimes it may feel like the Church has been ‘fenced off’, or that there are increasing obstacles that have to be overcome for connection with church communities. This week it has been unusual to hear, in the media coverage of the Southland floods, the Presbyterian Church communities mentioned as they assist in the disaster recovery. And, let’s be honest, maybe we don’t hear much about Church communities in the media simply because Church communities aren’t often involved in key events. Increasingly, Churches do not have the resources they once had to offer practical assistance. As church communities lose their social influence, they can correspondingly lose their ability to be involved – the lack of capacity follows the lack of having any significant role in the eyes of the surrounding culture. Phew! This is a pretty gloomy picture, huh? But for those of us who’ve been around for the last 2, 3, …4(?) decades, the decline of the social role of the mainstream church is familiar. We have observed people’s decreasing involvement in churches – along with rugby clubs, Girl Guides, Rotary, and other volunteer organisations. Many of us are still processing this lack of influence related to involvement stemming from a perceived lack of relevance in society. Some yearn for the ‘good old days’. Others see that the current picture isn’t all gloomy. What is it that really matters for Christian faith? If dominance in the public square is the most important thing, then we can concede the Church has lost a great deal. The Church is no longer wields significant power in politics, setting the moral agenda and social reform – in ways it once did. However, is Christian faith something more than dominating power? The Danish Philosopher, Soren Kierkegaard, warned the Christians of his day not to assume their Christian faith was assimilated into the national culture. He was worried about a prevailing attitude that reasoned to ‘be Danish’ meant to ‘be Christian’. For him Christian faith necessarily has a distinctive factor; Christianity must always retain a critical distance from the culture around it, in order to be faithful to God – first and foremost. I think Kierkegaard is on to something! Does this match what Jesus says…? Jesus says, You are the salt of the earth… You are the light of the world. What does this mean? Well, Jesus uses salt and light as images of change. They are nouns, but Jesus uses them to describe action. They bring difference (even transformation) from the bland; from the everyday gloom. Jesus says, You are the salt of the earth… You are the light of the world. (vv13,14) Remember, this is still early on in Matthew’s Gospel, as Jesus’ own ministry is beginning. And he’s laying out expectations about the mission of God, and people’s part in it. I’ve been preaching a consistent point this year so far: that, as followers of Jesus, we are invited to pray to God: ‘your Kingdom come on earth as in heaven’. We are implicated in the activity of God’s reign, and the further realisation of God’s reign. Jesus came in person, to reveal who God is, and how to be human. He blazes the trail and calls us to follow him. What does this mean for Christians today…? Theologian Stanley Hauerwas says: Jesus Christ is still the most interesting thing that the church has to say or to do in the world, the truth about us and God. God’s peculiar answer to what’s wrong with the world is a crucified Jew who lived briefly, died violently, rose unexpectedly, and even now makes life more difficult and out of our control—but so much more interesting than flaccid sociological analysis. …The church has trouble in the world because of Jesus. For God so loved the world that the Son was sent to the world, but the world has [not accepted him]. We wouldn’t know, that self-sacrificial, nonviolent love is the point of it all, without him.[1] Jesus says You are the salt of the earth… You are the light of the world. This seems extraordinary, that we would be thrust into the spotlight (almost literally!) It sounds like it’s about us, but we know this is ‘derived identity’ – we are salt and light because we are identified with Jesus. We get to have the enormous privilege to live as ambassadors of God: let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven. (v16) In the reading today from 1 Corinthians Paul makes clear to the Church, the most interesting thing that the church has to say or to do is Jesus Christ: I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ, and him crucified. … your faith rests not on human wisdom but on the power of God. (vv2 and 5) Perhaps it is worth reminding ourselves, as we are completing a significant strengthening project on this building, where we recognise power. We are investing in this building as a place for us to retain a presence in this city. We want to be among the world, the culture. And, having a recognisable place to stand together, allows us to be salt and light in the city. The building isn’t the salt and light – we are! In fact, do you notice Jesus says “You are the salt of the earth… You are the light of the world.’…? He doesn’t say “You should be the salt of the earth.” As though we have responsibility to be useful. Neither does he say “You will be the light of the world”, as though this is something saved up for a heavenly future. You are the salt of the earth… You are the light of the world. Already. Right now. If Jesus says this is what we are, do we need to earn this identity? Do we need recognition from others? Does the world need to acknowledge our ‘saltiness and brightness’? If we hear Jesus, and are willing to follow in The Way, we are on a mission. And this mission, although it centres on us (in Jesus’ words), its purpose is the glory of God. Let’s take that in for a moment… our mission brings glory to God.  There are needs everywhere in our world. Being salt and light in the world is to do God’s will and offer hope, offer purpose, offer meaning. By doing good, we do what we are made to do. And therefore, we become more who we truly are. So if we find ourselves questioning our identity because the Church is cut-off, isolated and marginalised in our society, let’s be reminded we don’t matter because we’re powerful, in control, and wielding influence. We matter because we are still following the One who proclaims an upside-down Kingdom and invites us to do whatever good we can in the world, to the glory of God. Let me finish with a quote from Stanley Hauerwas: once-disheartened church people [have] gained new enthusiasm for the odd way that Christ takes up residency among us, people who are able to say to various disbelieving, deadly presumptuous empires: “we are not going anywhere”. Let’s pray… ————– [1] ‘A reply by Stanley Hauerwas & William H. Willimon’ http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=11&sid=f6ab9bfa-080c-4692-9d45-1762d2963676%40pdc-v-sessmgr05
        • Accepted from St Johns in the City sermons 9 months ago by feedreader
        • Automatically tagged as:
        • religiousgroups
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)


      • Doubt it
        • 26 Feb 2020
        • St John's in the City
        • Sermon by Rev Allister Lane on 22 December 2019 Readings were Luke 1:5-20 and Luke 1:26-38 Download this sermon as a PDF If you think it seems you’ve heard these Bible readings recently – don’t worry it’s not you, it’s me.
        • Accepted from St Johns in the City sermons 9 months ago by feedreader
        • Automatically tagged as:
        • religiousgroups
        • St John's, Willis Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)



    1 - 30 of 94


    Feeds

    Latest Newsitems

    The latest newslog items.