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    • Too much news not always a good thing
      • 1 Apr 2020
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Tuning in for news on COVID-19 has now become part of many people’s daily lives. Millions of people around the world who now find themselves in lockdown are frequently accessing numerous social and news media platforms to seek up-to-the-minute information.
      • Accepted from VUW News feed 6 months ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • art
      • covid-19
      • media
      • people
      • Victoria University of Wellington, Waiteata Road, Aro Valley, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • March update from DCM - together we can end homelessness
      • 1 Apr 2020
      • Downtown Community Ministry
      • 96 March update from DCM - together we can end homelessness p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } March update from DCM - together we can end homelessness COVID-19 Supporting our taumai at this most challenging of times What a month it has been – for DCM, our taumai, and all of New Zealand. Is it just us, or does the first half of March seem so long ago, almost like we were living in a different world? Here at DCM, we are totally committed to finding new and different ways of working, so that we can continue to support people who are experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness throughout the COVID-19 crisis period. Doing things differently at DCM – Dom supporting taumai with Money Management in the courtyard, and Rob manning our 0800 number service for taumai from his home. It is important that we are able to provide appropriate levels of support related to the assessed vulnerability of the taumai. We have identified a group of the most marginalised taumai – these have been assigned to a support team and they will be supported across a number of key domains, including money management/access to income, food support, emergency housing, connection to mental health supports, and access to medication. Kaimahi are also rostered to share the task of supporting rough sleepers into emergency housing over this period. Where possible, kaimahi are keeping in touch with taumai who they are keyworking by calling them on the phones we have provided them with; we have also set up an 0800 number for taumai to call us on. As always, as we are able to lift up our taumai, in turn they lift us up; it is something very special to be part of this important mahi. As Stephanie reflected at the end of a very different Monday afternoon Foodbank session this week: “It has truly been very moving to be able to support our taumai at this time. Today a number of people came to us for food support. We were able to send them away with a generous selection of canned and dried foods, fresh fruit and veges, bread, milk and frozen meals. But more than that, we reminded them that we are still here for them, that so much has changed, but DCM is only a phone call away. As we spoke with taumai out in Lukes Lane, with spaces set up to ensure that we maintained and modelled safe distances, we asked them how things were going for them. People were in tears, they were so touched by the support and community that DCM continues to offer them.” Many of you have made donations for us to purchase phones for our taumai – one of our key responses to keeping in touch during this difficult time. Every day we hear uplifting stories from our kaimahi about taumai who have received and are using these phones. Nani shares one below, about a man who says very little. At the other extreme, yesterday Natalia received a very lengthy and reflective text from a man she has provided with a phone. He ended the text with this reflection – we couldn't have put it better ourselves: "We need to remind ourselves how lucky we are to be in Aotearoa, not only are we pioneers of the world, adversity brings us together. History has proven that. Maybe this is what we need to get us all together, to build again real communities". <!-- --> How can I help? When our seasonal kai for autumn (ngahuru) was not able to go ahead earlier this month, the wonderful people from Wellington’s Sikh community who were to prepare this community meal for our taumai, brought down 100 delicious pre-cooked meals, which we were able to hand out at our Foodbank. We have always known that DCM sits at the centre of a community that is totally committed to supporting us in our work to end homelessness. But at times like this, we are reminded of it daily, as so many of you have got in touch to ask what you can do to help. And of course your support is needed now more than ever. And so we have put together some thoughts on how you can continue to be involved during this lock-down period.   Click here to find out more. <!-- --> "It's Nani calling!" The Sustaining Tenancies team - Moses, Sia, Poutalie, Alan and Nani. This photo was taken 11 March at a mihi whakatau to welcome new team member, Poutalie. A few short weeks later, it is difficult to believe that we were all able to stand so close together just the other day! This year, we are introducing you to some of our kaimahi, the amazing team of people here at DCM who support taumai to access and sustain housing. Nani joined DCM's Sustaining Tenancies team last September. This team works with people at risk of homelessness, supporting them to sustain their tenancies and thrive in their homes. Tell us a little more about yourself, Nani. My full name is Utuagiagi Taupau; Utuagiagi is the name of my iwi on the island of Salua Manono Tai, and Taupau is my dad’s last name and title name. I love my Samoan culture, it has moulded me as a person and taught me all about love and respect, not only for myself but for all those who I come face to face with. I went to school just down the road from home: Russell School, Brandon Intermediate and – the best days of my life – Porirua College. What have you most enjoyed about your time at DCM so far? I’ve enjoyed meeting new people every day. It's also amazing to be able to work with and learn from my amazing team leader, Sia Toomaga. She continues to empower and encourage me to do better and I am very grateful for this. Your favourites... Food? Spicy fried chicken, taro, mum’s chop suey. Sport? Volley ball, touch and rugby. Film? War Room. Thing to do as a child? Playing gutter ball and of course eating. Whakatauki? “Ua fuifui fa’atasi ae vao ese’ese” – “We are from different parts of the forest, but connected in one cause”. At DCM we often share “moments” from our interactions with taumai. What’s a special “moment” you enjoying sharing with others? D is a man who doesn’t say very much. As you know, we have been working hard to provide our taumai with phones – this is so important at this very challenging time for everyone. I gave D his new phone, and I called him to test it. As his phone rang, my name came up as the caller, and he says very loudly: “Hey, it’s you; it’s Nani calling!” This was a moment for me, because D really only responds to his voices, or says yes and no. Yet here he was speaking to me, and using my name. Love it. <!-- --> Please help us get the message out there! Forward this email on to everyone you can think of who may be interested in how to respond to homelessness, and just generally people who are passionate about Wellington. <!-- --> Read More Success Stories Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2020 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
      • Accepted from DCM alerts archive 5 months ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
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      • media
      • rugby
      • covid-19
      • wellington
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    • THE VUW HALLS ARE (mostly) CLOSED
      • 25 Mar 2020
      • Salient
      • By Salient Staff <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Credit to Victoria University of Wellington The halls are closing. Education House, 222 Willis, University Halls, and Stafford House are remaining open as emergency housing along with Weir House. The Halls of Residence will remain closed throughout the lockdown and those who have been unable to return home will be moved into an emergency housing facility as soon as possible. This has caused widespread disruption to students who have not been able to return home ahead of the lockdown. “The announcement was a total surprise, especially as they had told us the hall would remain open no matter what.” commented one Weir House resident “I had planned to go out anyway, but now I have to clear my whole room” Azaria from Capital Hall told Salient “they essentially told us that we needed to find a way home within 48 hours without further notice, they've given us really mixed information and have sort of forced us out.” “I was planning to stay in the hall and they pretty much told me that if I could find a way home, I should.” The university’s decision to close the halls follows regulations set by the government and are aimed and reducing the infection rates among students. “As soon as I announced on Saturday that there was no longer any obligation to attend campus for any reason, the halls started emptying out right then” Commented VUW Vice-Chancellor, Grant Guilford. “We’ve had quite a few days to get people home so we’re in a slightly better position than some of the other universities.” While Guilford’s comments commended the Uni’s evacuation efforts, the same sentiment was not echoed by some residents. “[It’s] Caused a huge stir with Education House (comes under the umbrella of “Willis St Halls” with Cumberland) because they all have their own studio suites with bathrooms and kitchens, whereas Weir House are shared facilities” Comment Weir resident India. Not only this, but halls that are not currently being adapted for emergency housing are also still feeling the strain of this decision. “[Te Puni Village] was the same, just useless.” commented one resident. “We were told to go home with 48 hours notice. I’d already left by that point, but the communication and info from TPV has been shit.” The resident told Salient that they were expected to pack their rooms "like we were moving out", raising the question of how long VUW expected halls to be closed. The VUW website states that “All first-year students and Whānau House residents will be relocated to Weir House. This will ensure we can provide everyone a high level of care while ensuring health is protected through good public health practices.” On a Zoom meeting with Salient, the Vice-Chancellor insisted that there would be stringent self-isolation conditions within the remaining halls, which were to be administered by full-time staff, as well as some RAs. Guilford clarified that “there is a group of RAs that wanted to stay and wanted to be involved, so we’re likely to use some RAs in Weir, [...] but the bulk of the staff who will be deployed to these halls in this situation will be our permanent staff” The University was expecting only 250 to 300 students to remain within halls, however, they have informed Salient that this number is closer to 450-500. “We have three teams [at the halls] who we know are comfortable working through the shut down”, commented Guilford. “That allows us to spread the students out a bit more [...] at a couple of hundred it would have been okay at Weir but trying to pack 400 people in there would have been pretty hard.” The Vice-Chancellor continued to say that the focus for keeping these halls open was “Consolidating people into groups that can be properly looked after and properly fed.” If you are a student who has been moved to 222 Willis, Education House, Weir or another emergency housing facility we would love to hear from you. Please contact either news@salient.org.nz or editor@salient.org.nz and tell us how the Uni’s decision has impacted you.
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 5 months ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
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      • health
      • planning
      • wellington
      • art
      • housing
      • rates
      • zoo
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