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    • Damage of Whiria Project Furthering Distrust
      • 4 Oct 2020
      • Salient
      • While the highly controversial Whiria project did not progress further into stage 2, many restructural plans are continuing with similar essence. The impending financial issues VUW face are further building tension between University staff and University senior leadership. A university staff member spoke to Salient about their concerns shared with many colleagues, saying they “actually expect nothing good anymore [from the University]”
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 2 weeks ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • consultation

    • VUW Academics Stand with Māori Academics at University of Waikato
      • 27 Sep 2020
      • Salient
      • Rachel Trow | Kāi Tahu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa | She/Her <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Photo: Stuff After incidents at Waikato and Otago Universities, an open letter to Education Minister Chris Hipkins has been undersigned by Māori academics across the country. The open letter calls for a national enquiry into racism at New Zealand universities “for the purpose of committing to, and accelerating with urgency, a tertiary sector that honours te Tiriti o Waitangi.” The letter comes after caps on Māori and Pacific entry to Otago Medical School and an independent enquiry into racism at the University of Waikato garnered national attention. Leading academics Dr Linda Tuhiwai Smith (Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Porou) and Prof. Brendan Hokowhitu (Ngāti Pūkenga) have not had their contracts renewed at Waikato while the review takes place, according to RNZ reporting. In a statement to Salient, Victoria University expressed support for the open letter sent to Minister Hipkins, adding that they “do not conduct specific cultures [sic] reviews as such” themselves. The University listed their “commitment to decolonisation and indigenisation” as ranging from “symbolic changes” such as changing the University’s name to “active and visible commitments” such as including Māori leadership at all levels of University structure. VUW also recognised that “there is always more to do.” Academics at VUW have come out in active support of Māori academics at the University of Waikato, participating in a solidarity event on Friday the 18th of September. Staff were encouraged to wear purple and “incorporate Waikato Indigenous academics” into their teaching. Salient spoke to Dr Emalani Case (Kanaka Maoli) and Dr Vincent Olsen-Reeder (Ngā Pōtiki a Tamapahore), representatives of the solidarity event at VUW. Olsen-Reeder commented on the situation at Waikato, stating that “it’s really hard to see your colleagues, friends and whānau in distress. So many of us have been victims of racism in some form, at some time, so we’ll always want to show solidarity in that way.” Case and Olsen-Reeder were in agreement that VUW had “solid fundamentals in place” in regards to race at the University citing their Treaty Statute and Māori Outcomes Framework. However, the pair echoed the University’s assertion that there is always more that can be done. Dr Case offered that “one of the things I think all universities can do is hire more Māori and Pacific staff.” Case highlighted the importance of hiring Indigenous staff in permanent positions. When asked what they would like tertiary staff and students to consider moving forward, Olsen-Reeder told Salient, “I would love for us all to review what it means to be a great citizen of Aotearoa, regularly… Ask yourself how you can dismantle harm today, or open up space for someone, or challenge the stuff your parents taught you. Those are great things to do not just to combat racism, but to be anti-racist.”
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 3 weeks ago by tonytw1
      • Automatically tagged as:
      • media
      • vuw

    • Whiria Project: Major VUW Restructure in the Works, But With Great Push Back
      • 30 Aug 2020
      • Salient
      • Te Aorewa Rolleston | Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi te Rangi | She/Her <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Victoria University of Wellington is proposing a substantial restructure plan named the ‘Whiria Project’—which translates as “to plait” or weave. The proposal has come as a surprise to many staff and has largely been met with resistance, particularly from unionised staff. The 30 page discussion document seen by Salient also lacks substantial focus on student experience and engagement.  According to senior leadership, the proposal is the University’s effort to “adapt” to the current times with the economic impact of COVID-19 a significant feature of the discussion document.  The discussion document outlines a series of significant changes across the entire structure of the University which will impact students, staff, schools of learning, and senior leadership.  Key areas of focus within the document include: Dividing and sectioning the current three tier organisational structure to make it more fluid and efficient Aligning the current academic systems to the strategic plan focusing on a global, civic university Examining ways to incorporate values of Te Tiriti o Waitangi more centrally Increasing communication and engagement within the institution  Managing the financial stability and cost savings of the university. The proposal has been met with great pushback from stakeholders, highlighting the need for consistent communication and transparency from the University.  Salient spoke to VUWSA about their contribution and participation in the Whiria project and whether they believed there had been sufficient consultation.  Acting President of VUWSA, Taylah Shuker said they, alongside the Student Academic Committee, were "disappointed with the level of consultation from the University about the Whiria project." Shuker also confirmed that VUWSA had to actively seek documents and facilitate consultation, adding that “if students had been approached early on it would have shown a commitment to students as partners and acknowledged the potential affects this project has on them.” VUWSA understands there is no intention to hold specific student consultation.  As a result, “VUWSA has requested an executive summary of the Whiria discussion document (shorter than the 28 pages to make it more accessible for students), with clear communication on how students can submit feedback.” At the time of publication, VUWSA had not received a summary. As well as consultation with students and student representatives, there were also concerns expressed for academic and administrative staff.  Several VUW staff have spoken to wider media explaining that staff were already feeling exhausted and stressed and that the recently revealed discussion document was worrying.  Tutor and doctorate student, Erica Cassie told Salient that many tutors have been sharing their concerns around the University's decision making. She said the insufficient consultation has caused many tutors to fear for their job security.  Cassie said, “The first time I actually saw the document was when it was released to staff a few days ago.”  “There haven’t been discussions in our school and there hasn’t been a great amount of information sent to me either as a tutor or as a postgraduate student.” “It’s really hard to pass the document, it does not make sense to most people.” “Staff are focussed on trying to teach and support students through all the ongoing disruptions of this year - now is not the time to be piling on still more uncertainty and the prospect of job cuts.” Co-President of the Tertiary Education Union VUW Branch, Dougal McNeill, said that "It is astounding that, in the middle of an ongoing global pandemic, the University's senior leadership should think this a good time to initiate wide-ranging and ill-thought-out restructuring.” McNeill added that the further centralisation and concentration of power Whiria proposes “will be bad for students and staff. It's more of the same tired managerialism that has served higher education so poorly over the past decades. And it would have to result in job losses.”  He stresses that students and staff “need more connection, support and interaction as a community of learners, not still further powers given to an ever-growing centre.” Union members joined in what were some of the biggest union meetings in years to have their say on this project.  McNeill states The Whiria Project needs to be withdrawn, “and the Vice Chancellor and Provost need to work urgently to try and restore trust and relationship with University staff."  Salient spoke to Deputy Vice Chancellor Māori,  Professor Rawinia Higgins about the proposal and the contribution the Māori community have had in the proposal’s intentions.  “As we were trying to weave together a number of different reports that we had done over time, Whiria was really trying to put that into a discussion document.”  “In terms of the Māori part of that, I was very much involved and Dr Ocean Mercier (Te Kawa a Maui) was included.”  Professor Higgins explained that this was a kaupapa where Māori were definitely involved and that it was an opportunity to look ahead at how the university will function in the future. Professor Higgins went on further to explain that she was confident with the support being facilitated by the leadership team in centralising the iho of the university, the marae complex and normalising Te Reo Māori. In regard to engaging and consulting tauira, Professor Higgins said that “to my understanding, people within their respective communities are engaging with their representatives.”  “I had the Ngāi Tauira (Māori Student’s Association) representatives join me in a Zui and assume they will engage their student bodies. I have said that I am happy to talk if they want me to.” The discussion document recommends giving Te Kawa a Māui more prominence in the new structure as a means to upholding Te Tiriti. In statement the University responded to Salient’s request for comment on the Whiria Project and the concerns being felt by students and staff.  “The document released is a discussion document not a proposal. It offers some high-level draft recommendations simply to help clarify, challenge and progress thinking prior to consultation.  The document was put together by the Senior Leadership Team after discussions with those whose roles could be affected by changes to the academic structure, namely SLT Members, Deans, Associate Deans and Heads of School.” “The discussion document was developed by the people whose roles could be affected by changes to the academic structure.  This week’s issue of Whītiki—our student newsletter—will include an item directing students to a Whiria project webpage and the discussion document.” Students and staff have been given until the 14th September to provide feedback on the Whiria Project following which a report will be released sharing those responses. Students are invited to contribute feedback via email to whiriafeedback@vuw.ac.nz The full discussion document (pictured above) is now available on the University's website.
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 1 month ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • consultation
      • covid-19

    • VUW Pushes Back Tri 2 Start Date and Cancels Face-to-Face Exams
      • 23 Apr 2020
      • Salient
      • Victoria University of Wellington has pushed back the start of Trimester 2 by one week. The Trimester 2 examination period has been replaced by an assessment period with no face-to-face exams. The new start date for Trimester 2 is Monday the 13th of July. The mid-trimester break remains the same at August 17th to the 30th. Trimester 2 will end on Friday the 16th of October.
      • Automatically tagged as:
      • media
      • vuw

    • THE VUW HALLS ARE (mostly) CLOSED
      • 25 Mar 2020
      • Salient
      • By Salient Staff <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Credit to Victoria University of Wellington The halls are closing. Education House, 222 Willis, University Halls, and Stafford House are remaining open as emergency housing along with Weir House. The Halls of Residence will remain closed throughout the lockdown and those who have been unable to return home will be moved into an emergency housing facility as soon as possible. This has caused widespread disruption to students who have not been able to return home ahead of the lockdown. “The announcement was a total surprise, especially as they had told us the hall would remain open no matter what.” commented one Weir House resident “I had planned to go out anyway, but now I have to clear my whole room” Azaria from Capital Hall told Salient “they essentially told us that we needed to find a way home within 48 hours without further notice, they've given us really mixed information and have sort of forced us out.” “I was planning to stay in the hall and they pretty much told me that if I could find a way home, I should.” The university’s decision to close the halls follows regulations set by the government and are aimed and reducing the infection rates among students. “As soon as I announced on Saturday that there was no longer any obligation to attend campus for any reason, the halls started emptying out right then” Commented VUW Vice-Chancellor, Grant Guilford. “We’ve had quite a few days to get people home so we’re in a slightly better position than some of the other universities.” While Guilford’s comments commended the Uni’s evacuation efforts, the same sentiment was not echoed by some residents. “[It’s] Caused a huge stir with Education House (comes under the umbrella of “Willis St Halls” with Cumberland) because they all have their own studio suites with bathrooms and kitchens, whereas Weir House are shared facilities” Comment Weir resident India. Not only this, but halls that are not currently being adapted for emergency housing are also still feeling the strain of this decision. “[Te Puni Village] was the same, just useless.” commented one resident. “We were told to go home with 48 hours notice. I’d already left by that point, but the communication and info from TPV has been shit.” The resident told Salient that they were expected to pack their rooms "like we were moving out", raising the question of how long VUW expected halls to be closed. The VUW website states that “All first-year students and Whānau House residents will be relocated to Weir House. This will ensure we can provide everyone a high level of care while ensuring health is protected through good public health practices.” On a Zoom meeting with Salient, the Vice-Chancellor insisted that there would be stringent self-isolation conditions within the remaining halls, which were to be administered by full-time staff, as well as some RAs. Guilford clarified that “there is a group of RAs that wanted to stay and wanted to be involved, so we’re likely to use some RAs in Weir, [...] but the bulk of the staff who will be deployed to these halls in this situation will be our permanent staff” The University was expecting only 250 to 300 students to remain within halls, however, they have informed Salient that this number is closer to 450-500. “We have three teams [at the halls] who we know are comfortable working through the shut down”, commented Guilford. “That allows us to spread the students out a bit more [...] at a couple of hundred it would have been okay at Weir but trying to pack 400 people in there would have been pretty hard.” The Vice-Chancellor continued to say that the focus for keeping these halls open was “Consolidating people into groups that can be properly looked after and properly fed.” If you are a student who has been moved to 222 Willis, Education House, Weir or another emergency housing facility we would love to hear from you. Please contact either news@salient.org.nz or editor@salient.org.nz and tell us how the Uni’s decision has impacted you.
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 5 months ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • vuw
      • health
      • planning
      • wellington
      • art
      • housing
      • rates
      • zoo
      • people

    • I Fucking Love Architecture School
      • 27 Sep 2015
      • Salient
      • Hoo boy, if there is one thing in this world that I love more than anything else it is studying fucking architecture at Te Aro campus.
      • Accepted from Salient main feed 60 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • architecture
      • Victoria University School of Design, 139, Vivian Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • Ermagherd, rent
      • 1 Jun 2015
      • Salient
      • Rent prices in Wellington are continuing to rise, with a 1.3 per cent increase over the last year, according to Trade Me. The property website’s Rent Price Index shows that as of April this year, an average Wellington rental property now costs tenants $395 per week. A study by the NZUSA gives the average rent prices for students living in Wellington at around $195 per week, much higher than the national average of $125.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 62 months ago
      • Automatically tagged as:
      • media
      • vuw

    • More Help Needed
      • 10 May 2015
      • Salient
      • Last week the VUWSA Women’s group marked the 2015 Annual Wellington Rape Crisis appeal with collections on campus. Wellington Rape Crisis is a safe support system for men and women who have experienced assault and those who are either too afraid to report an incident or, as Rape Crisis spokesperson Eleanor Butterworth says, those needing “to talk about any sexual experience that has left [them] feeling like something isn’t right.” VUWSA Women’s Group President Chrissy said that the group is “extremely passionate about supporting not-for-profit causes like Rape Crisis because we understand how valuable their services are for women”.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Automatically tagged as:
      • media
      • vuw

    • Is Karori over the hill?
      • 10 May 2015
      • Salient
      • Speculation has intensified in recent weeks over the University’s worst kept secret—its desire to sell the Karori campus.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • karori
      • Victoria University of Wellington College of Education, Scapa Terrace, Karori, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6012, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • VUWSA and Uni weigh in on Council’s plans
      • 10 May 2015
      • Salient
      • VUWSA and the University have made submissions to the Wellington City Council’s recently drafted Long Term Plan for 2015 to 2025. The Long Term Plan looks at the current and future needs of Wellingtonians and sets out how the Council plans to improve the city and what it will spend. VUWSA’s submission pointed out that students contribute at least $610 million to the city’s economy annually and expressed the association’s hope that the council will continue to work on a Warrant of Fitness plan for rental housing.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • housing

    • In Which Philip Eats Alone at Logan Brown
      • 3 May 2015
      • Salient
      • Conventional wisdom has it that New Zealand’s two largest cities have distinct Australian correspondents. There is at least one way in which Wellington doesn’t sync up, however, and that is when it comes to food. It’s not that our food isn’t great, but Melbourne has the “foodie capital” allure. We have a variety of cheap, mostly unpleasant Malaysian BYOs. Sure, we tried valiantly to rep our eatery steez with “Wellington on a Plate”, but when a university cafe qualifies as an entry you know something’s amiss.
      • Accepted from Salient Features Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • restaurants

    • Wellington: “Hi, cycle lanes!”
      • 3 May 2015
      • Salient
      • The Wellington City Council has proposed a new cycle lane plan in the hope of making Wellington at least seem like a cycle-friendly, modern city. According to Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown, 76 per cent of Wellingtonians said they would cycle within the city and suburbs if there were more protected bike lanes. The proposed cycling framework would cater to both experienced and inexperienced cyclists and builds on previous cycle policies that were put forward in 2008. One of the proposed lanes would see cycleway access for students up to the University campus in Kelburn.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • cycling
      • kelburn
      • cycleway

    • Restaurant Review: The Bresolin, Willis St
      • 27 Apr 2015
      • Salient
      • I had high hopes for this place after checking the menu out online. It seemed like a mid-to-high-end sort of establishment, offering a range of steaks on the Lunch/Dinner menu that were priced anywhere up to $70. I mean, you sort of start to take a restaurant seriously once they can justify charging you that much for a piece of meat and then expect you to buy sides on top of that.
      • Accepted from Salient main feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • reviews
      • restaurants
      • The Bresolin, Willis Street, Aro Valley, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • How does it feel? Blind
      • 27 Apr 2015
      • Salient
      • The recent attack on Adelaide Road has hit me hard. I, like many people, have walked Adelaide Road late at night. When walking anywhere late at night, the fear of attack is always in the back of your mind, but you walk on. The fear of sexual assault is a reality, but you never actually expect it to happen so close to home.
      • Accepted from Salient main feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • crime
      • Adelaide Road, Kowhai Park, Newtown, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6023, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • More than just numbers
      • 27 Apr 2015
      • Salient
      • The number of Māori and Pasifika students enrolling at Victoria is rising annually, but there are still issues around the retention and admission of students.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • vuw

    • Headline disappoints after Salient runs out of housing-related puns
      • 19 Apr 2015
      • Salient
      • The Wellington City Council will lobby the Government to introduce mandatory standards for rental housing in 2015. Over the last year the WCC has been trying to establish a rental house Warrant of Fitness programme along with local councils from around New Zealand. The Council commissioned a field test that found that only six percent of the 144 houses surveyed passed Warrant of Fitness standards. Further trials were conducted by Housing New Zealand, which saw similarly high failure rates.
      • Accepted from Salient News Feed 65 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • housing
      • wcc

Latest Newsitems

The lastest Newslog Items.

    • Ophelia Thinks Harder
      • 25 Oct 2020
      • Stagecraft Theatre
      • Are you a Shakespeare buff who loves Hamlet? Or are you new to Shakespeare and want an accessible way in? Do you just want to be part of a quirky play full of larger than life characters and outrageous moments of comedy? Maybe you want a chance to challenge some gender politics? If you said ‘yea’ to any of these, read on.
      • Automatically tagged as:
      • theatre

    • Titahi Bay Dinghy Capsize
      • 20 Oct 2020
      • Coastguard Mana
      • Operation Details Date/Time:  Fri, 16/10/2020 - 21:00 - Sat, 17/10/2020 - 00:30 Operation Type:  SAROP Cat 1 People Assisted:  1 Total Volunteer Hours:  35 Vessel Details Length:  3.00m Resources Attendees:  Devine CMFF Weedoogie Jake_Presling Jason Hall Katestewart Mark Presling Neil Cornwell Polarbear NZ Tuatara CRV's Used:  CRV Pelorus Attachments Image:  read more
      • Accepted from Coastguard Mana news 5 hours ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • titahi-bay
      • tuatara
      • -41.107291, 174.818514