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    • Play sparks curiosity at Tamariki Markets
      • The Play HQ space at Nōku Te Ao Capital E is dedicated to tamariki under six and their whānau. Halo Collins is Experience Wellington Mātanga Hōtaka Hāpori Tamariki’s Public Programmes Specialist. When I was a kid, I loved playing shop and creating my own menus. I do remember Mum was always delighted to see that […] The post Play sparks curiosity at Tamariki Markets first appeared on Capital E.

    • National Theatre for Children Auditions now open!
      • Nau mai, haere mai!  Capital E Live, National Theatre for Children, Te Whare Tapere ā-Motu mō ngā Tamariki, is holding auditions for professional adult actors for roles in their 2023 touring production “The Grumpiest Boy in the World”, for audiences aged 5-11 years old.  Physical theatre performers needed with acting and singing experience. Experience working with […] The post National Theatre for Children Auditions now open! first appeared on Capital E.

    • National Theatre for Children Auditions now open!
      • Nau mai, haere mai!  Capital E Live, National Theatre for Children, Te Whare Tapere ā-Motu mō ngā Tamariki, is holding auditions for professional adult actors for roles in their 2023 touring production “The Grumpiest Boy in the World”, for audiences aged 5-11 years old.  For more details and to apply, visit The Big Idea. Closing date […] The post National Theatre for Children Auditions now open! first appeared on Capital E.

    • National Creative Residency 2022
      •          The National Theatre for Children hosted its first National Creative Residency for Aotearoa-based Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA) aspiring makers. The 15 selected participants came brimming with ideas and energy and produced exciting work in response to the wonderful creative provocations of guest mentors Kate Parker and Benjamin Henson.     The programme […] The post National Creative Residency 2022 first appeared on Capital E.

    • Benefits of Displaying Your Child’s Art
      •     Capital E and the Wellington Sakai Association asked the tamariki of Wellington to “draw what home means to you” for the 5th annual Wellington Children’s Art Exhibition.  On now at Wellington Museum, the adorable exhibition runs until Friday 27 November. Selected artworks will be displayed in Wellington’s sister city Sakai, Japan.  For the 3 to 12-year-old Wellington artists, “home” is found in whānau, pets, nature, houses, monster […] The post Benefits of Displaying Your Child’s Art first appeared on Capital E.

    • Creative Collider Residency
      •   Capital E’s National Theatre for Children recently hosted the inaugural Creative Collider Residency, a unique programme designed to upskill local theatre practitioners and support the creation of high-quality theatre for young audiences. Fourteen Wellington-based theatre creatives attended the residency from 15-18 October at Waihōanga River Lodge and Retreat in Ōtaki.  The Creative Collider focused on supporting theatre practitioners to develop vibrant, relevant new work for tamariki by providing guidance from skilled industry mentors and access to new networking opportunities. The programme included pitching sessions, group […] The post Creative Collider Residency first appeared on Capital E.

    • Capital E Nostalgia Project
      • Capital E has been inspiring tamariki since aaages ago. Growing up in Wellington during  90s, Capital E (or Capital Discovery as it was known back then) in Te Ngākau Civic Square is a place of fond memories for me. We visited often and had numerous school and whānau visits there. My favourite part was the big red vertical slide! These childhood sentiments were echoed in an exciting project I got to work on, the Capital E Nostalgia Video Project. Earlier this year we put a call out seeking people who played, learned and created at Capital E in their youth. We asked them to share their memories. Here are some of the highlights below with links to their videos: Ashton Henty – One of Ashton’s first memories at Capital E was the giant red vertical slide. Ashton has done a bit of acting and theatre over the years which set him on the path of music management and he has since worked alongside well-known New Zealand musicians and icons. “Capital E was great for that free, open learning. The creativity was there” says Ashton. Gemma Aitchison – Capital E is a place that Gemma will never forget. In the 1990s, Gemma describes Capital E as a magical place, a thrilling and sensory experience that she remembers to this day. For Gemma Capital E is such an important resource for children, enabling them to dream, explore and create. Today she shares the magic at Capital E with her tamariki to help them express their creativity. Riki Gooch – Pōneke music legend Riki Gooch – drummer, composer and founding-member of Trinity Roots – talks about his memories of Capital E from 2012. Jamming out with tamariki during Orchestra of Spheres and Lord Echo – Riki values the importance of never losing sight of playfulness, or the imagination you have as a child. “There’s always that engagement of tapping into your inner child as than adult,” Riki says. Bethany Miller – Bethany Miller is a producer, performer, actor and Capital E Alumni. Back in 2006 Bethany experienced ONTV and enjoyed working with the tele-prompter and map-screen in what felt like a professional setting. Her confidence grew and she loved seeing the final product. “It’s pretty cool to know that that exciting experience of presenting in the Capital E newsroom, has become somewhat of a reality with what I do now,” says Bethany. Awa Puna – Filmmaker and actress Awa shares with us how Capital E sparked her passion for filmmaking. As a young person Awa was involved in the Roxy 5 competition and wrote a play called Tui the Vampire in association with Capital E. Seeing her final film on the big screen made her ambitious to continue film making and connect with audiences on a deeper level with her creativity.  It was heart-warming to see the positive influence Capital E has had on so many creative people. Capital E is still a place where tamariki are encouraged to, as my 10 year old poet self put it, “do what you want and let go of your cares”.     The post Capital E Nostalgia Project first appeared on Capital E.

    • Seasons – Reviews
      • The 2021 junior education tour for the National Theatre for Children is well underway with the completion of the first part of the tour. The second part of the tour kicks off in the Wellington region from 19 October before heading to the South Island.  5000 children from schools and early childhood centres across the North Island have already seen the 2021 version of Seasons, The public season of Seasons received rave reviews and the education tour is no different. The clever use of Te Reo Māori, NZSL and English and the ear-wormy songs have been a big hit with teachers and tamariki alike. We wanted to share some of the lovely messages that we have received from our audiences so far. Congratulations to all involved on such a beautiful and well received show! “They were dancing & clapping along. When we got back to the school van they even sang the songs.” TKKM Kaiako, Gisborne “Well done team, great story, amazing singing and instrument playing, age-appropriate, engaging, loved the colours and variety of NZ insects, the best show yet. We loved the use of te reo and sign language.” ECE Teacher, Tauranga “Excellent experience, right from the friendliness of the theatre staff to an amazing, professional show!  Thanks so much, the best show we have been to for ages.” Year 1 Teacher, Hawkes Bay “My three children came home from the show and last night they were inspired. I had to find them an old white sheet and a torch, they then pulled out the dress ups and proceeded to put on a show for us in the living room. Starting with all three under the sheet with a torch making shadow puppets with their hands. This was followed by lots of dancing and singing and many costume changes.” Parent, Tauranga The post Seasons – Reviews first appeared on Capital E.

    • Seasons – Feedback
      • The 2021 junior education tour for the National Theatre for Children is well underway with the completion of the first part of the tour. The second part of the tour kicks off in the Wellington region from 19 October before heading to the South Island.  Over 7000 children from schools and early childhood centres across the North Island and our public season have already seen the 2021 version of Seasons, The public season of Seasons received a rave review and the education tour is no different. The clever use of Te Reo Māori, NZSL and English and the ear-wormy songs have been a big hit with teachers and tamariki alike. We wanted to share some of the lovely messages that we have received from our audiences so far. Congratulations to all involved on such a beautiful and well received show! “They were dancing & clapping along. When we got back to the school van they even sang the songs.” TKKM Kaiako, Gisborne “Well done team, great story, amazing singing and instrument playing, age-appropriate, engaging, loved the colours and variety of NZ insects, the best show yet. We loved the use of te reo and sign language.” ECE Teacher, Tauranga “Excellent experience, right from the friendliness of the theatre staff to an amazing, professional show!  Thanks so much, the best show we have been to for ages.” Year 1 Teacher, Hawkes Bay “My three children came home from the show and last night they were inspired. I had to find them an old white sheet and a torch, they then pulled out the dress ups and proceeded to put on a show for us in the living room. Starting with all three under the sheet with a torch making shadow puppets with their hands. This was followed by lots of dancing and singing and many costume changes.” Parent, Tauranga The post Seasons – Feedback first appeared on Capital E.

    • Heart Warming Letters to Capital E
      • One of the rewarding aspects of working in an arts and heritage organisation is hearing from our audiences about how their experiences with us have impacted their lives. Capital E’s educators are frequently the lucky recipients of this feedback from the young people they work with, receiving handwritten thank you letters from tamariki in schools across the country. ​​​​​​​ This week we have a heart-warming letter to Capital E from a North Island school who recently visited our OnTV digital studios.  “Dear Capital E Staff, Thank you so much for letting us come and explore your awesome facility. It was so fun to use all of the cool equipment like professionals, we all learnt so much and had a great time. Yours sincerely, Oakura School.” The post Heart Warming Letters to Capital E first appeared on Capital E.

    • Theatre for Young Audiences panel event
      • An event was held for the Theatre for Young Audiences sector hosted by Capital E and Circa Theatre, in collaboration with PAYPA (Performing Arts for Young People Aotearoa) on 19th April at Circa Theatre Wellington. This was an inaugural event which included an introduction to PAYPA, the launching of a new award for the TYA sector, and a practitioner panel discussion on why and how we engage young people when making theatre.  With an aim to bring the sector together and connect, celebrating the successes of making work for young audiences and looking forward to how work is made with children and young people, over 90 people attended in person and online. Photo: TYA panel at Circa Theatre Wellington. As part of the evening, PAYPA announced an exciting new award in memory of Peter Wilson, the ‘Peter Wilson Award for Excellence in TYA’. Peter who was the founding director of Capital E’s National Theatre for Children until he left in 2013 to start his own company, Little Dog Barking; passed away earlier this year. This annual award created by PAYPA will currently be looked after by the Wilson family until its first recipient is announced in 2022. Kerryn Palmer, the administrator for PAYPA (Performing Arts for Young People in Aotearoa) held a panel for the evening to discuss how practitioners work with young people with featured speakers; Tanemahuta Gray (Taki Rua productions), Kenny King (Little Dog Barking), Sacha Copeland (Java Dance) and Mel Luckman (Cubbin Theatre Company) offering amazing insights to the sector needing more advocacy and recognition for making work for children; not as an audience in waiting but one in their own right. Photo: Tane Mahuta Gray (Taki Rua) and Mel Luckman (Cubban Theatre). As Kerryn Palmer said, “It was exciting to have a group of TYA practitioners in the same room, celebrating and valuing TYA work in New Zealand. It is easy to feel disconnected within the industry, and alone as you often create work in a silo, so it is always great to come together and share ideas in a group. To have PAYPA supported by our only Totara funded TYA company -Capital E- and by Circa theatre is fantastic. We can make real inroads into strengthening and advocating for all the TYA work that is happening nationwide, with the long-term goal of all children in Aotearoa New Zealand have access to high-quality theatre made specifically for and with them”. Photo: Kerryn Palmer (second from left). Sue Giles, the artistic director of Polyglot Theatre and newly elected President of Assitej International also spoke at the event on her work for young audiences in Australia in an effort to inspire New Zealand practitioners on how they approach this important young audience. “It was so amazing to have Sue speak at the event, being such an influential figure in the sector internationally, looking to our international leaders to get inspiration and build connections” (Beth Taylor, Producer at Capital E) The event was a collaboration between PAYPA, Capital E: National Theatre for Children and Circa Theatre was the inaugural networking session for the sector but with hope to make this an annual occasion in the future, bringing practitioners and organisations together. Photo: Sue Giles (pictured on screen). The post Theatre for Young Audiences panel event first appeared on Capital E.

    • Meet the cast of Seasons – Flora
      • Growing up, Flora loved escaping to new worlds through stories, that love only grew greater when she realised that through theatre, she got to become a direct part of them. Having gained a Bachelor of Creativity in Performing Arts (Musical Theatre) in 2020 from Te Auaha, Flora has been fortunate enough to have leading roles in ‘The Addams Family: A New Musical’ ‘Cry-Baby The Musical’ (2019) and most recently ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ (2020). A highlight of Flora’s was performing with Orchestra Wellington in the 2019 show ‘Heroes and Villains,’ where she was a part of bringing the magic of music to children. Flora is delighted to be looking towards a future of sharing her New Zealand based training  for all audiences bringing worlds to life through music, writing, storytelling and movement.    What is your favourite seasons of the year and why?  My Favourite season is DEFINITELY Summer, the days are longer which means spending more time with your friends and family and going for lovely sunset walks on the beach. It’s the kind of weather that makes you feel the same INSIDE as the sunshine OUTSIDE. What are you most excited about for this show and why? I am so excited to be meeting lots of new friends throughout all the different seasons in the show and being able to bring the magic of theatre to families across New Zealand.  What is your favourite thing to do in Summer?  My Favourite thing to do in Summer is saying hello to all of the people and the dogs that I walk past on my walk from my house to the beach, listening to music and letting the cuffs of my jeans get sandy and wet in the ocean! What is your favourite animal and why? My favourite animal is a Deer because I think they are very graceful and elegant and they have very soulful eyes     Wellington, NZ. 12.03.2021. Capital E National Theatre for Children presents SEASONS. Written by Peter Wilson. Photo credit: Stephen A’Court. The post Meet the cast of Seasons – Flora first appeared on Capital E.

    • Meet the cast of Seasons – Dom
      • “Dom is soon to graduate from Victoria University with a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Film, with a minor in NZSL. Recently, he performed in LEGEND, and toured the play Too Much Punch for Judy around South island high schools. Shout out to his partner Olivia, and their tabby cat, Susan.   What is your favourite seasons of the year and why?  My favourite season is spring because I love seeing the beautiful colours of flowering fruit trees – it always reminds me of the gorgeous cherry blossoms where I grew up. What are you most excited about for this show and why? I’m really looking forward to working on Seasons because it’s an amazing opportunity to experiment with puppets and learn from some of the best theatre-makers in the country. I’ve always wanted to develop skills in puppeteering. What is your favourite thing to do in Summer?  My favourite thing to do in summer is to have a nice long nap. The warmth and humidity makes me super sleepy! My favourite animals are ducks because they warm my heart with their quacks, clumsy waddles, and desperation for food.” Wellington, NZ. 12.03.2021. Capital E National Theatre for Children presents SEASONS. Written by Peter Wilson. Photo credit: Stephen A’Court. The post Meet the cast of Seasons – Dom first appeared on Capital E.

    • Meet the cast of Seasons – Mia
      • Mia Alonso-Green is a Wellington based performer who graduated with a performing arts degree from Te Auaha New Zealand School of Creativity. She has recently come back from the UK but delved right into the capital’s theatre scene. Recently seen in WITCH’s theatre concert and as a featured soloist in Unity Dance Company sold out season of “Unity In Advertisity” she is grateful for the arts and cannot wait for her opportunity with Capital E.   What is your favourite seasons of the year and why?  My favourite season is Autumn. The colour of the leaves on trees during autumn are so beautiful and eye catching.     What are you most excited about for this show and why?  Being able to travel around Aotearoa while performing to kids, that is what I am most excited about!    What is your favourite thing to do in Summer?  Sitting on a beach with a guitar and my friends is my favourite thing to do in summer by far.     What is your favourite animal and why?  My favourite animals are Elephants; they are fascinating and have such a strong family bond!    Capital E National Theatre for Children presents SEASONS. Written by Peter Wilson. Photo credit: Stephen A’Court.   The post Meet the cast of Seasons – Mia first appeared on Capital E.

    • Behind the Scenes – Simon Watts from SoundScapes
      • What inspired you to start designing or making as a profession? Keeping my fingers in several ‘creative pies’ over the years is what’s kept me designing. I like to think ‘design’ goes further than how most refer to its definition. My past consists largely of dance/choreography (design of movement), percussion (design of rhythm) and Audio Engineering (the design of sound/music). My recent work – designing and building interactive installations for events – combines a combination of these skills which I have an on-going fascination for. What inspires you when you are working on a project? I find almost anything can be fuel for inspiration. Turning noise into music has often been a big inspiration for my work. An example of this is the story of dancing to the beat of the washing machine, something I couldn’t resist as a toddler. Years down the line I took this as inspiration to produce a music track completely out of sounds recorded from my washing machine and then worked in choreography for it to become a live performance piece. What is your favourite element of the SoundScapes play activation and why?  My favourite element is the echo chamber! A huge ‘echo’ or ‘reverb’ is an out of body experience which never gets old. Tell us about someone that inspires you. I have a group on ‘Whatsapp’ of the ‘Creative Lads’ I toured with in theatre show ‘Stomp’. We often bounce around and exchange ideas to help and encourage each other on creative projects from our various corners of the world.     The post Behind the Scenes – Simon Watts from SoundScapes first appeared on Capital E.

    • Te Reo Māori Zines
      • In celebration of Mahuru Māori we have created these free te reo zines for you to download. There’s five to choose from, with tales from singing pīwakawaka, grumpy taniwha, naughty tūī and talking cats and dogs! Our designer Flavia, writer Lizzie, and translator Wiremu created these and we think they are awesome! Ka mau te wehi! If your tamariki love these as much as we do, we’d love to see your photos! Please email them to Hana at: hanam@experiencewellington.org.nz Cat Language | Te Reo Ngeru Dog Language | Te Reo Kuri Don’t draw in this book! | Kaua e tuhi ki rō nei! The Hungry Tui | Te Tūī Hiakai Yeah Right | Tēnā pōhēhē tēnā A note on printing: They print double sided with te reo and the English translations on either side. It’s really important when you go to print them that you choose A4 paper size and then make sure it is printing “actual size” (not “fit” or “shrink”). Otherwise the pages won’t line up with the folds in the zine & it’ll look silly! Once printed, follow these instructions on how to fold your zine: https://www.readbrightly.com/how-to-make-zine/   The post Te Reo Māori Zines first appeared on Capital E.

    • Digital DJing
      • Words by Kit Benham, Digital – Technical Coordinator at Capital E. Do you love music? Do you love to dance? Maybe you play an instrument or love music-making apps. Maybe you already dream of a future as a globetrotting superstar DJ, playing to packed dancefloors of adoring ravers! Okay, that may seem a long way off, but in this post we hope to offer some help for those keen to learn more about DJing, covering the basics of what digital DJing is and how it can offer a cheap way to start down the road to DJing. Then, we’ll look at a couple of software options that might be perfect for helping you take your first steps.  What is digital DJing?  Two turntables and a microphone! When we think of DJing this is still the image that comes to mind for most. Digital DJing simply means using a computer or device in place of traditional DJing equipment like turntables, CDJs or DJ control hardware.  Not long ago, the need for equipment made learning to DJ an expensive and time-consuming undertaking. First, you needed to invest in two turntables and a DJ mixer. Then you needed to learn how to beat-match – the painstaking technique of carefully adjusting the speed of each turntable to get both vinyl records playing in time. But you couldn’t start doing that without first buying a bunch of records (or having some generous DJing friends to borrow them from!)  Digital DJing removes the need for this equipment, making it much easier to give it a go in order to see if DJing is something you’d like to explore further. And, rest assured that even free DJing software allows options to integrate hardware into your workflow as your skills develop.  How do I get started?  It has never been easier (or cheaper) to get started with DJing. A smartphone or tablet with the right app is plenty to start making some noise, and you can even DJ from within your web browser. But, you’ll pretty soon be looking for a more capable option and the easiest one here is a computer, something you may already have access to. It won’t need to be super powerful, but it will need speakers or headphones attached.  Next, you’ll need some DJing software. Professional options here can be quite expensive, but later we’ll look at two options that won’t cost you anything despite being surprisingly well-featured. DJing software commonly has a shared layout and workflow. The top half is where performance happens with decks to control each song at left and right, and a mixer in between to adjust and blend them. The lower half of the screen is where you’ll choose songs and manage your music library. With the most important controls accessible via hotkeys, a keyboard and mouse or trackpad are all you need to perform. It might feel a bit overwhelming at first, but any learning you do will translate well to other platforms and you can simplify the screen layout while you find your way around.  Finally, you’ll need some music. Most DJing software can sync with your iTunes or other music libraries, but many DJs prefer to set up their collection manually, grouping songs by style, tempo, and other categories to make it as easy as possible to find what they want to play. Your software will be able to analyse your songs for you, saving information like key and BPM (beats per minute) to make it much easier for you to find songs that fit well together. How you find your music is up to you, but aim for high-quality files and don’t play the music you haven’t paid for – producers work hard to create their art and thanks to platforms like SoundCloud there’s more than enough free music at your fingertips!  What software do we recommend?  MIXXX 2.0  Windows, macOS and Linux, open-source, free  Mixxx is our top choice for DJ software that is free to download and use. Where most free software options offer intro or “lite” versions or hide features behind expansion packs and in-app purchases, Mixxx seems too good to be true – fully-featured, professional DJing software that is completely free and always will be. While they do accept donations on their site they’re proud to keep their software free and open-source, meaning the programming code is freely available in order to allow curious developers to tinker and personalise to their heart’s content.  Mixxx leaves plenty of room to explore as your skills develop. Supporting up to 4 deck mixing, a full range of audio effects, the ability to connect microphones and external inputs, and full internet streaming and recording options, you won’t run out things to learn any time soon. And, with the ability to connect external hardware, and as the only free software to support for vinyl control – where traditional turntables or CDJs are used to control your digital decks by hand – you could go from beginner to a full professional setup all within the one piece of free software.  VirtualDJ  Windows, macOS, free for home and non-commercial use  Our second choice for getting started on a budget is VirtualDJ, which offers a free version for home and non-commercial use. Armed with a well-earnt reputation and the endorsement of big-name DJs, VirtualDJ is hugely popular with beginners thanks to its slick, easy-to-learn look and feel. But don’t be fooled, even the free version offers a serious set of professional features, many of which aren’t found elsewhere.   Unlike Mixxx, VirtualDJ follows a scalable pricing model where a one-off payment or monthly subscription is required to unlock key features. But, a quick look at their handy comparison sheet reveals that paid features are mostly for professional DJs making an earning through their performances, or those who wish to connect VirtualDJ to external hardware like DJ controllers and vinyl control systems.  So, you won’t get absolutely everything for free with VirtualDJ, but what you do get is well worth the free price tag. And, features unique to VirtualDJ like access to streaming services might make it the right choice for you. Support for video DJing, including a full range of video effects, means this software could be just what you need to develop a truly unique performance style! 

    • EXPLORING CREATIVITY IN THE ONTV STUDIO – Part 2
      • Words by Kristen Rowe, OnTV Coordinator at Capital E. So why is creativity such a great thing to indulge in, especially during an OnTV session? As author Kurt Vonnegut says, “To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.” There’s a number of benefits that creativity brings: Developing confidence Engaging in the creative process builds confidence because it comes with ups and downs. A risk of ‘failure’ also leads to self-discovery. Once we see that failure is not the end of the world, we’re more open to taking risks, releasing fear, and stepping forward into new experiences. Getting creative results in growth and a boost to self-confidence. The OnTV studio is a fantastic space to encourage students to stretch themselves by taking on a new challenge. Self-expression and discovery Creativity provides freedom through self-expression. There is a deep satisfaction that comes from developing, shaping, and creating something yourself.  When you create, you put something of who you are into the work – your personality, your skills and your ability. Through experimenting and exploring you can also discover new interests, passions, and talents. I particularly love to see this play out in the OnTV studio. Often students are initially intimidated by their role (especially if it involves mastering technical equipment!) and by the end of the session discover that they can do it and they’ve had fun! OnTV’s ‘taster’ experience at Capital E, inspires students to continue exploring creativity and filmmaking in their own time. For some, it also results in an expanded view of what future career paths could hold. Capital E. Generic image showing facilities. Photo copyright Mark Coote/markcoote.com Creating brings joy! There’s nothing better than the satisfaction that comes when you finish creating – something new has been made out of nothing! We often see this sense of enjoyment and satisfaction from groups who work hard to learn their roles and successfully record their own unique show. Later on, they can also share, and relive this experience with their friends and family by watching the video at home. Improving mood We live busy lives, and the average person has around 60,000 thoughts rushing through their head daily! Any creative act helps focus and reset the mind. Getting creative positively impacts the brain and body. When you finish a creative task (which could be anything from drawing a picture to writing in a journal, to performing in an OnTV show!) your brain is filled with dopamine. This is an all-natural anti-depressant and makes you feel good! Capital E. Generic image showing facilities. Photo copyright Mark Coote/markcoote.com Increasing resourcefulness Being creative helps adapt your thinking. It leads to better problem-solving. Instead of coming from a logical, linear approach, your creative side can look at a situation from all angles. Sometimes obstacles arise while you are creating, so you must be resourceful in identifying and implementing new solutions. As you discover new ways of seeing, thinking, and doing, this instills confidence that you’re able to tackle the next challenge, whatever it might be! In the OnTV studio, we film the show as a ‘live production’ so there’s no stopping if mistakes happen, or if the record doesn’t run as planned! Here students are given an opportunity to think on their feet and implement creative solutions to problems as they arise. Forging connection to others Throughout life, social connection plays a large role in our wellbeing. Sharing creativity with others allows for new ideas to be sparked, as well as the opportunity to give and receive feedback and encouragement. A strong sense of community and connection is deeply rewarding! In the OnTV studio, teamwork is vital. Connection within groups are often strengthened through the sharing of a new, creative experience. Capital E. Generic image showing facilities. Photo copyright Mark Coote/markcoote.com

    • EXPLORING CREATIVITY IN THE ONTV STUDIO       
      • Words by Kristen Rowe Welcome to Capital E’s OnTV studio, an environment that provides kids new experiences with technology in the context of creating a ‘live’ news show! This challenge promises the excitement and uncomfortableness of trying something new with room to settle in and explore creativity in a team dynamic. As a tutor, one of my favourite moments is when a group first enters the OnTV studio and sees the green screens, lights, studio cameras and ‘scary’ looking equipment with lots of buttons and knobs. Usually there’s a wide-eyed ‘woooahhh!!’ expressed from students as they enter the space and are itching to get their hands on the equipment. Seeing students learn, explore and master new skills is a satisfying thing to be part of – especially when the realization hits that every role is vital to the success of the show. Each student’s participation becomes a piece to the puzzle, fitting together to create the best show possible. What makes for a really great OnTV show? The answer is not just in mastering the technical equipment but is found in utilizing and practicing ‘soft’ skills, such as teamwork, clear communication, listening skills, resilience and creativity. The hands-on nature of the studio lets students learn as they do. Every chapter of the OnTV experience from  ‘Practice and Prep’ time to the ‘Dress Rehearsal’, reflection time, and the ‘Final Record,’ offers engaging and kinetic learning. “Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun.” — Mary Lou Cook (actress). Creativity maximises students’ enjoyment of the learning experience by experimenting with their unique voice, personality and flair. OnTV is one big creative sandpit where kids’ imagination thrives! How can groups ‘get their creativity on’ in the OnTV studio? OnTV scripts topics are designed to produce ‘out-of-the-box’ thinking. The stories are often absurd, weird and wacky, leaving room for students to take the narrative wheel. Stories include an extraterrestrial threat in Alien Invasion, what happens after ‘happily ever after’? in Once Upon a Crime; an upside down building project in Wake Up New Zealand and much more! Every OnTV role stretches that creative muscle! Reporters and Interviewees work together on developing the interview questions and answers. Groups can choose from exemplar questions but we love it when students use their creativity to make their own! This team is also in charge of their role’s characterization. It’s fantastic when performers deliver their pieces with a bit of drama and expression. The Wardrobe team create interesting costumes for each of the performers. What should an alien look like? Does a politician have to wear a suit – or should some quirky elements be added to help express both personality and professionalism? Technical Crew roles don’t miss out on adding their creative flair either! There’s always additional elements a tutor can introduce to encourage learning and creativity for eager students. The Technical Producer chooses greenscreen backgrounds for each interview and pictures to introduce each story. They work with the Vision Mixer to decide on transition effects between camera shots. Should a monster hand pull in the next scene, or should there be an explosion? The Sound team decide on music for each segment, and if there’s time, they can add in a few sound effects. And finally, The ‘management’ team! The Director, Floor Manager, and Location Manager assist the cast and crew with their creative decisions, ensuring everyone is on track so the show flows well and starts on time. Camera Operators decide how to frame their subjects and create the best-looking camera shot. Graphic Artists set the show’s visual tone and style by creating digital art and on-screen graphics with descriptive titles to introduce performers and segments. Do you want your group to be even more creative? In the Newscast programme, students pre-write their own script! Here students brainstorm the stories and interviews they’d like to include, write the joining links for presenters and decide the show’s name. This allows for even more ownership during the creation process and contributes to a greater sense of accomplishment for the group by making a show the world has never seen before!                                          

    • Easy Unity Game Tutorial (Whack-A-Mole)
      • New to Unity and coding? Try making this easy game and learn a lot along the way! Why use Unity? Unity is one of the best apps for game development. When it comes to Unity, they’ve made the process for cross-platform development quite simple and easy to use, being highly flexible and highly extensible to create any game genre you want. The personal version is completely free, giving you instant access to starter resources to help you learn Unity quickly. Compared to other platforms, the Unity assets store is a great place to get free packages to start with that are easy to download and import. If you’re stuck on what to do, YouTube has a wide range of great beginner tutorials that are easy to follow. You can also make use of the tutorials and courses that Unity offers on its website to help develop your skills further. Take a read of the starter manual to help you learn Unity Editor and explain the basics of the Unity interface and menu items.  

    • Capital E GETS A PROGRAMMING UPDATE
      • This year our programmes are undergoing a refresh at Capital E as the Digital Team (Kit, Kristen, Loren and Marten) continue to work on new education programmes for OnTV and MediaLab. Though the pandemic has thrown in a few curve balls, we are looking towards term 3 to begin unveiling our new and revised line-up. The digital and media landscape evolves and changes quickly, so the team constantly work on bringing new technology and techniques into our learning spaces. The team are assessing all the programmes on offer and identifying ways they can support teachers in boosting important key competencies and delivering the widest range of curriculum needs, including both the Digital and local curriculum. In OnTV, we’ll be retaining the light-hearted, lively experiences of Alien Invasion, Wake up NZ! and Once Upon a Crime as well as audience favourite Newscast. The student-led inquiry and ability to customise makes Newscast an essential option for those wanting to explore the Local Curriculum. Sportsdesk brings together humour and team-spirit to compliment your class focus this year. Staying on offer in MediaLab is Coding: App Making, 3D Game Design and Your VR, all programmes that tie in with the digital curriculum; Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes. According to the World Economic Forum in 10 years’ time, 9 out of 10 jobs will require digital skills, as people, rather than being replaced by computers will work alongside machines. All our MediaLab programmes blend creativity and digital technology, but try out Music Making to link into the music curriculum. We have some exciting new programmes on their way, and we hope you can find the new line up an enticing mix of the classic and the cutting edge in our 2020 programming.

    • Digital Education Refresh
      • This year the Digital Education programmes are undergoing a refresh at Capital E as the Digital Team (Kit, Kristen, Loren and Marten) continue to work on new education programmes for OnTV and MediaLab. Though the pandemic has thrown in a few curve balls, we are looking towards term 3 to begin unveiling our new and revised line-up. The digital and media landscape evolves and changes quickly, so the team constantly work on bringing new technology and techniques into our learning spaces. The team are assessing all the programmes on offer and identifying ways they can support teachers in boosting important key competencies and delivering the widest range of curriculum needs, including both the Digital and local curriculum. In OnTV, we’ll be retaining the light-hearted, lively experiences of Alien Invasion, Wake up NZ! and Once Upon a Crime as well as audience favourite Newscast. The student-led inquiry and ability to customise makes Newscast an essential option for those wanting to explore the Local Curriculum. Sportsdesk brings together humour and team-spirit to compliment your class focus this year. Staying on offer in MediaLab is Coding: App Making, 3D Game Design and Your VR, all programmes that tie in with the digital curriculum; Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes. According to the World Economic Forum in 10 years’ time, 9 out of 10 jobs will require digital skills, as people, rather than being replaced by computers will work alongside machines. All our MediaLab programmes blend creativity and digital technology, but try out Music Making to link into the music curriculum. We have some exciting new programmes on their way, and we hope you can find the new line up an enticing mix of the classic and the cutting edge in our 2020 programming.

    • Digital Education Reboot
      • This year our Digital Education programmes are undergoing a reboot at Capital E as the Digital Team (Kit, Kristen, Loren and Marten) continue to work on new education programmes for OnTV and MediaLab. Though the pandemic has thrown in a few curve balls, we are looking towards Term 3 to begin unveiling our new and revised line-up! The digital and media landscape evolves and changes quickly, so the team constantly work on bringing new technology and techniques into our learning spaces. The team are assessing all the programmes on offer and identifying ways they can support teachers in boosting important key competencies and delivering the widest range of curriculum needs, including both the Digital and Local Curriculum. In OnTV, we’ll be retaining the light-hearted, lively experiences of Alien Invasion, Wake up NZ! and Once Upon a Crime as well as audience favourite Newscast. The student-led inquiry and ability to customise makes Newscast an essential option for those wanting to explore the Local Curriculum. Sportsdesk brings together humour and team-spirit to compliment your class focus this year. Staying on offer in MediaLab is Coding: App Making, 3D Game Design and Your VR, all programmes that tie in with the Digital Curriculum; Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes. According to the World Economic Forum in 10 years’ time, 9 out of 10 jobs will require digital skills, as people, rather than being replaced by computers will work alongside machines. All our MediaLab programmes blend creativity and digital technology, and we’re also offering our popular Music Making session which links into the Music Curriculum. In our new combined experience Game On! , students can get the best of both worlds with 1 hour of 3D Game Design and 1 hour of Multiplaying Gaming. We have other new and exciting programmes on their way in 2020, and we hope you find the new line up an enticing mix of the classic and the cutting edge!

    • Creativity Collection – For Ages 6-12
      • We have compiled and curated a list of websites with high quality and inspiring creative content and fun and inspiring activities to do with your tamariki, or for them to do by themselves at home during lockdown.   Have fun creating and making!      TATE Modern Visit TATE Modern https://www.tate.org.uk/ in London, UK to see their online displays, and check out their dedicated children’s website Tate Kids https://www.tate.org.uk/kids  We love the range of art activities that can be found here, ranging from pop art design and fun art quizzes to online Street Art creations. We highly recommend checking out Create Line An Artist https://www.tate.org.uk/art/create-artist where children (and adults) can learn skills from casting to weaving, and with art activities for adults and children.              Exploratorium – Explore, Play & Discover  The Exploratorium in San Francisco, USA is a museum that invites children to explore and experience human perception, art and science. Their website offers a range of fun and engaging online activities to feed and inspire children’s wonder and curiosity. Link https://www.exploratorium.edu/explore     Exploratorium – Science Snacks  The Exploratorium Science Snacks are bite sized, hands-on and fun science activities using cheap and available materials. This is a great site for all children who love testing and experimenting    https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks    MetKids   MetKids is a digital feature for, with, and by children, sharing the amazing art that can be experienced in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, USA. On this site, children can hop in the Time Machine to discover big art ideas from different time periods and aeras and watch awesome Q&A videos of children interviewing artists about how art can tell us about who we are, and much more.   https://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids/    Design Digital Island Fashion   This is a great activity for young budding fashion designers.  Rako is an arts collective based in Fiji, New Zealand and Australia and on their website children can learn about Rotuman patterns which can be used to design and create their own online Pacific outfits and garments.  https://play.qagoma.qld.gov.au/island-fashion/    MakerBox – Daily Creative STEAM Challenges  Our friends at MakerBox have created a range of engaging and creative daily challenges sure to get children’s creative juices going.  On this website you can find lots fun and engaging activities to do at home, ranging from building flying contraptions and marble runs to sewing and making cool animations.   http://makerbox.org.nz/daily-challenges/      Coding Challenges  The website code.org https://code.org/ offer technology interested children code projects with easy step-by-step guides for children to enable them to create animations, games, websites and much more.    Record a Podcast  The Pineapple Studio want children all over the world who are stuck at home to share their stories in the podcast The Kids are All…Home/ This is a fun opportunity for children to learn how to make their own podcast at home and to share their stories with others around the world.  http://pineapple.fm/stuck-at-home    Nanogirl   Nanogirl’s online science Lab has a range of fun and engaging STEM projects and activities suitable for 6-11 year olds.   https://nanogirlslab.com/  Family Maker Camp – Make, Create, Discover, Play, and Share!  Family Maker Camp https://makercamp.com/  encourages making and hands-on learning from home, and provides inspiration, guidance and an opportunity to share what you do with others online and become part of a community of Makers. #Maketogether with Mario the Maker Magician and check out the Upcoming Events section and their website video tutorials for fun activities, Find out more https://makercamp.com/events  https://makercamp.com/event/bug-bites2/    OK Go Sandbox –   OK Go Sandbox https://okgosandbox.org/ is an online resource who uses OK Go’s music videos as starting points for integrated guided inquiry challenges allowing children to explore various STEAM concepts. OG GO Sandbox is about bringing different ideas, disciplines and people together to explore creativity and learning.   Karen’s top tip: I highly recommend you check out the cool video Art in Microgravity https://okgosandbox.org/upside-down-inside-out/art-in-microgravity about the challenges of creating art in micro gravity, through play, experimentation, trial and error.      ARTS:LIVE  ARTS:LIVE https://www.artslive.com/ is an Australian  award-winning, creative learning hub for the arts, which allows children of all ages, educators and parents to explore, learn and develop their creative skills.   All the resources have been developed with professional artists and arts organisations. Explore a range of fun craft, art, media and music activities on ARTS:LIVE for children and families to do together at home https://www.artslive.com/at-home/  Here you will find anything from Designosaurus https://www.artslive.com/courses/designosaurs/  exploring and experimenting with design and performance, to how to play the ukulele https://www.artslive.com/courses/pick-the-ukulele/ and much more. 

    • Creative Collection
      •   TATE Kids Visit the website for TATE Modern https://www.tate.org.uk/ in London, UK to see their online displays, and check out their dedicated children’s page Tate Kids https://www.tate.org.uk/kids  to discover an amazing range of fun art activities inspired by the great artists for little ones.   Try out making a collage Matisse Snail  https://www.tate.org.uk/kids/make/cut-paste/collage-matisse-snail , or make a cardboard loom and learn how to weave https://www.tate.org.uk/kids/make/cut-paste/learn-weave with artist Anni Albers.   Karen’s Tip: Weaving is a fun and relaxing pre-school activity that stimulates fine motor skills and hand eye coordination. Have a play with weaving with different materials such as string, paper strips, thin long leaves, flowers, wool and even small sticks, and mix them to create interesting patterns and textures. 

    • Creativity Collection – For Ages 3-5
      • We have compiled and curated a list of websites with high quality and inspiring creative content and fun and inspiring activities to do with your tamariki, or for them to do by themselves at home during lockdown.   Have fun creating and making!  TATE Kids Visit the website for TATE Modern https://www.tate.org.uk/ in London, UK to see their online displays, and check out their dedicated children’s page Tate Kids https://www.tate.org.uk/kids  to discover an amazing range of fun art activities inspired by the great artists for little ones.   Try out making a collage Matisse Snail  https://www.tate.org.uk/kids/make/cut-paste/collage-matisse-snail , or make a cardboard loom and learn how to weave https://www.tate.org.uk/kids/make/cut-paste/learn-weave with artist Anni Albers.   Karen’s Tip: Weaving is a fun and relaxing pre-school activity that stimulates fine motor skills and hand eye coordination. Have a play with weaving with different materials such as string, paper strips, thin long leaves, flowers, wool and even small sticks, and mix them to create interesting patterns and textures.    The Artful Parent – 3D and Sculpture The Artful Parent website has a good selection of inspiring process focussed and engaging art and crafts activities for littlies which are similar to the ones we offer in our Little Creators programme in PlayHQ.  One of the many activities you will find here which your little ones might enjoy is making 3D art and sculptures. https://artfulparent.com/3-d-art-sculpture-ideas-kids/  Karen’s Tip: Little children love building and making sculptures, towers and 3D creations.  You can use pretty much anything from blocks and recycled materials to popsicles, sticks, play dough, wood and items like sticks and stones found in nature.     TATE Modern – Show the World Your Artwork   Photo: artwork made by child (I have plenty if you want me to scan and send one)  At TATE Modern https://www.tate.org.uk/ in London, UK, you can not only experience amazing art in their online displays, children can also submit their own creations at Tate Kids (link) https://www.tate.org.uk/kids/gallery) gallery,  they also can enjoy seeing the artworks of other children.     The LEGO Foundation – Learning through Play (Parent Education Resource)  The LEGO Foundation https://www.legofoundation.com/ in Billund, Denmark aims to build a future in which learning through play empowers children to become creative, engaged, lifelong learners.  On this website you can find  lot of interesting and inspiring articles and studies on the importance of play, as well as inspirational tips and activities for using different types of play to support development and learning in children.   Karen’s Tip: I highly recommend reading the article Discover How Different Types of Play Support Your Child’s Development https://www.legofoundation.com/en/learn-how/types-of-play/ When we design play installations in PlayHQ we always try to cater for as many different types of play as possible.     The Kiwi Conservation Club   The Kiwi Conservation Club https://kcc.org.nz/  website has a good selection of fun and creative activities for children to do in nature or to make, inspired by nature. Many of their activities are created by children which is just awesome and most of the activities can be created using recycled materials.   Karen’s top tip: Check out the creative fruit feeder for birds https://kcc.org.nz/portfolio/making-fruit-feeders-for-birds/ activity created by children, and turn your empty milk bottles into a purposeful and fun projects for your little ones to make and decorate.     ARTS:LIVE  ARTS:LIVE https://www.artslive.com/ is an Australian  award-winning, creative learning hub for the arts, which allows children of all ages and parents to explore, learn and develop their creative skills. All the resources have been developed with professional artists and arts organisations. Explore a range of fun craft, art, media and music activities on ARTS:LIVE for children and families to do together at home https://www.artslive.com/at-home/  Karen’s Top Tip: Try out Playing the Pitch https://www.artslive.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Playing-the-Pitch.pdfand turn glasses of water into musical instruments and experiment by adding different amounts of water to containers. What songs can you make?  

    • Maker Faire Wellington
      • After 2 wonderful years, Capital E will no longer be producing Maker Faire Wellington. As you can appreciate, this was not an easy decision. We are focusing our resources on activities for our core audience of children and young people and looking forward to delivering an amazing 10th National Arts Festival for young Wellingtonians in 2021. We’re proud of bringing Maker Faire to NZ and fortunate to have had such a great partnership with Make Community. It’s been an enriching learning journey, and we look forward to continuing to support and work with New Zealand’s maker communities. We’d like to say a big thank you to the Makers from across Aotearoa and beyond for bringing Maker Faire Wellington to life.  You’ve sparked and inspired creative thinking and expression, reaching more than 9,000 people! We encourage makers to continue your journey of invention and creativity by joining the Make Community. Lastly, thank you to all who attended Maker Faire Wellington to make these events a success. Let’s continue to celebrate the maker movement by bringing creativity and the DIY ethos into our lives every day!  Follow our creative journey at the Capital E Facebook page

    • MediaLab Programmes
      • NZ Curriculum Achievement Objectives they correspond to: Programme Digital Technology Literacy Visual Arts Music – Sound Arts Extra Information Key Competencies 21st Century Learning Skills Music Making Level 2, 3 & 4 Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes Level 2, 3 & 4 • Purposes & Audiences • Structure • Ideas                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                N/A Level 2, 3 & 4 •Developing Ideas •Communicating and Interpreting   • Thinking • Managing Self • Using Language, symbols and text •Participating and Contributing • Collaboration • Knowledge construction • Skilled communication • Real-world problemsolving and innovation • Use of ICT for learning • Self regulation 3D Game Design Level 2, 3 & 4 Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes Level 2 • Purposes & Audiences Ideas Level 2 & 3 •Developing Practical Knowledge N/A STEM • Thinking • Managing Self • Using Language, symbols and text •Participating and Contributing • Collaboration • Knowledge construction • Skilled communication • Real-world problemsolving and innovation • Use of ICT for learning • Self regulation Coding: App making Level 2, 3 & 4 Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes Computational Thinking for Digital Technologies Level 2, 3 & 4 • Purposes & Audiences •Structure N/A N/A STEM • Thinking • Managing Self • Using Language, symbols and text •Participating and Contributing • Collaboration • Knowledge construction • Skilled communication • Real-world problemsolving and innovation • Use of ICT for learning • Self regulation Your VR Level 2, 3 & 4 Developing and Designing Digital Outcomes Level 2, 3 & 4 • Purposes & Audiences •Ideas Level 2, 3 & 4 •Developing Practical Knowledge N/A STEM • Thinking • Managing Self • Using Language, symbols and text •Participating and Contributing • Collaboration • Knowledge construction • Skilled communication • Real-world problemsolving and innovation • Use of ICT for learning • Self regulation Multiplayer Gaming N/A N/A N/A N/A Not educational Students do not learn 3D Game Design in this session                                                                                                          • Thinking • Managing Self • Using Language, symbols and text •Participating and Contributing • Collaboration • Knowledge construction • Skilled communication • Real-world problemsolving and innovation • Use of ICT for learning • Self regulation

    • Little Creators: Texture and Paint
      • Let’s explore how different textures create unique patterns! You’ll need: Materials with different textures (corrugated cardboard, scraps of materials, fake grass etc) Paint Paint brushes Sponges Sheets of paper Set out all of your textures on the floor (on top of a tarpaulin if you have one to help with clean up!). Let the children get creative, dabbing paint onto the textures with sponges or paint brushes. Before the paint dries, place a piece of paper over the top and push down. Carefully left up and see what pattern is on the paper

    • Talking ‘Te Kuia’ with Taki Rua
      • Last Saturday,  Taki Rua held the World Premiere of their latest show Te Kuia Me Te Pūngāwerewere in Te Marae, Te Papa as part of the Capital E National Arts Festival. This show is a prequel to the Patricia Grace classic, The Kuia and The Spider, and is performed entirely in te reo Māori using gestures and movement so that even non-speakers can follow along and enjoy.  We had the privilege of talking to Ama, who is not only one of the performers of the show but also helped to devise the work! Hi Ama! How would you describe your show in 5 words or less? A timeless tale of friendship. What do you want tamariki /children to take away from your show? That no matter what age, race, gender or species, friendships can be made anywhere and with anyone. What are you most looking forward to in the Capital E National Arts Festival? I’m most looking forward to sharing our unique and playful spin on the classic tale, and to see all the beautiful tamariki! How has theatre helped you grow your creative spirit? Working alongside other creatives has really helped the growth of my creative spirit. I’ve learned more about portraying different characters, finding deeper meanings within a text, and allowing myself to play and share offers to the work. What’s your earliest ‘creative’ memory? Entering a songwriting competition at school. I made the top three! I was quite proud of myself – I had thought I wasn’t great at composing, but it felt great to take on the challenge. Taki Rua will be performing their amazing show for students all week at the Capital E National Arts Festival before taking the show on the road for a NZ school tour. Make sure to keep an eye out for a performance near you! Public tickets are still available for other shows this weekend but be in quick! Tickets are selling out fast! Book now.

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