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Covid-19

    • COVID-19: Alert level 1 update for all services
      • 21 Sep 2020
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • The Wellington region is currently in COVID-19 Alert Level 1The latest amendments to travel restrictions are:  From Tuesday 22 September, face coverings are no longer mandatory on any Metlink services While face coverings are no longer mandatory, passengers can continue to wear them out of personal preference.
      • Accepted from JVL Line alerts 9 hours ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Election 2020 – voting from hospital
      • 21 Sep 2020
      • Hutt Valley District Health Board
      • Due to COVID-19, Electorate Returning Officers will not be collecting votes from patients in hospital either in the lead up to or on Election Day. Hospitals will also not be used as designated voting places. However, people who cannot get to a voting place because they are in hospital can still vote.
      • Accepted from HVDHB news 1 day ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Sign languages are real languages
      • 21 Sep 2020
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • COVID-19 has put sign language in the public eye, and New Zealand is often regarded as a shining example of strong status recognition, but there is much scope for improvement.
      • Accepted from VUW News feed 13 hours ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19
      • Victoria University of Wellington, Waiteata Road, Aro Valley, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • A spike in vaccine development
      • 20 Sep 2020
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington’s Dr Davide Comoletti is playing a pivotal role in New Zealand’s drive to develop a COVID-19 vaccine.
      • Accepted from VUW News feed 13 hours ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19
      • Victoria University of Wellington, Waiteata Road, Aro Valley, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • Junior Prizegiving Timetable
      • 16 Sep 2020
      • Petone FC
      • To all Junior parents, grade managers and coaches; Here is the confirmed timetable for our Junior Prize Giving which will be held over the last weekend of our regular football season. Please note: This prizegiving schedule only applies if Lower Hutt moves to Covid19 Alert Level 1. Your coach will hold a team-only prize giving […]
      • Accepted from Petone FC 2020 5 days ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Bikes & Brunch, 20th September
      • 16 Sep 2020
      • Cycle Aware Wellington (CAW)
      • UPDATE: In light of movement to Covid Alert Level 2 this event has been moved provisionally to 20th September Bring along your whānau and have a chat about all things bike in Te Whanganui-a-Tara! We’ll be sharing ideas on fun places to bike with family and friends around the Wellington region and places to do a good biking staycation in Aotearoa, so bring your favourite biking stories.
      • Accepted from CAW HTTPS 6 days ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Not Quite Dorset Ridge
      • 14 Sep 2020
      • Wellington Tramping and Mountainneering Club
      • With the club Ruahine Crossing tramp cancelled due to COVID Level 2 restrictions I managed to persuade a number of club members to come out on a private trip with me that had the goal of having a fun weekend out in the hills. One of the options Tony suggested was Dorset Ridge from Jumbo ... Read more
      • Accepted from WTMC news 2020 1 week ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • A city with a vision? AKL x WLG
      • 6 Sep 2020
      • Talk Wellington
      • Wellington’s got a lot of bustle and noise (Let’s Get Wellington Moving – Spatial Plan – new subdivisions – convention centre – library) but where’s the coherent vision? Hey Auckland – can we learn some things? The Wellington Urbanerds invited some insightful Aucklanders to talk about the Auckland City Centre Masterplan (CCMP) because it’s getting a lot of positive interest in nerdy circles nationwide, and we thought “Wellington needs one of those to galvanise our progress!” But it turns out that the CCMP is not the cause of Auckland’s progress – it’s a milestone marker of a bigger evolution in Tāmaki.  Auckland City Centre’s chief urban designer George Weeks was insightful, visually engaging and occasionally very funny. Auckland city centre’s chief transport designer Daniel Newcombe injected insights that were pithy and thought-provoking. All up it’s worth watching the video – details at the bottom. But this post has some of the big insights for Wellington that we took away.  Hat tip to Charles Dawson for invaluable note taking. A galvanising vision, with a strong whakapapa  What makes the CCMP unusual as an official planning document, Weeks told us, is that it’s not “a planner’s plan” – 2,000 pages of vision down to prescriptive requirements. Instead it’s “the brochure for the city centre”. He told us that “with the 2012 CCMP, we thought it was better to have a 200 page document that 10,000 people see, or at least have skimmed, than a 2,000 page document that 100 people read in detail. We have used this approach to shape the 2020 CCMP.” It has had a major refresh in the last 8 years and the 2020 version is quite something. Galvanising vision  Weeks took us through how the updated CCMP works: how it delivers on the Auckland Plan’s promise of life in Auckland, through the city centre’s form and function. It’s worth laying these out because while we definitely have bits of the formula, there’s some powerful elements we’re missing.   Experience of being there The Auckland Plan (essentially the Tāmaki-Makaurau 30-year plan) sets out ten Outcomes for the city – effectively the promise of life experience that you should get, being in Auckland. The whole super-city is supposed to fulfil these promises, and the city centre’s no exception. In the CCMP, the ten citywide Outcomes or life promises are intertwined with eight place-specific Transformational Moves. The latter are the major initiatives to change the physical environment of the city centre so it can deliver those outcomes – the good Auckland experiences – for anyone who’s there.  A lot of this has come into the 2020 CCMP thanks to Access for Everyone (A4E), the city centre’s transport programme done to support the CCMP refresh process (more on A4E later). Street forms and place shapes… So the 2020 CCMP has street explainers that show – conceptually but with a lot of verisimilitude – the components of the streets and buildings, the overall shape of the whole public realm that’s needed for the city centre to give people that great experience.  a generic “transit street” explainer – from the CCMP These explainers are conceptual, but are tied enough to specific places, that everyone can see the trajectory of how their specific bit of the city will be changing, but crucially they can see a really solid why. …because This means “X street, and its environment, should have Y shape and form because…”. We saw, for example, that one of the biggest streets in the Learning Quarter, Symonds Street, will be a transit street for all these reasons: Symonds St, for example, needs to become a transit street not because of some abstracted notion of “sorting out the transport” but because it is at the heart of Auckland’s city centre universities, and “transit street” is the form for Symonds Street that will let it best serve people in the Learning Quarter with the good experience the Auckland Plan promises. Weeks flicked through a few examples of how the CCMP is signalling change to the built environment of Tāmaki’s city centre (which is pretty interesting – have a play here, the 2020 version is fully digital!) Our impression of all this was that the CCMP, thanks to the Auckland Plan and Access For Everyone (the transport dimension), has pretty well integrated two things that any self-respecting city needs to integrate. This is the roles of movement (transport) and place or exchange (destination activity) in any given area of the city centre. And Auckland manages to integrate these with a nice clear Why and Because for each set of changes. [Hold on, is that anything special? We know about this stuff… This tight integration – of form to function, place with movement, built form to people’s lived experience – seems pretty elementary for self-respecting cities. And you’d be forgiven for assuming Wellington has that integration in place. Indeed, things like the street concepts in Auckland’s 2020 (refreshed) CCMP don’t look too dissimilar to what LGWM put out for the Golden Mile. And the material coming out from LGWM and the Central City elements of the Spatial Plan and Wellington 2040 use a lot of the right words. Golden Mile concept from LGWM But in listening to Weeks’ presentation, we realised just how explicit and unequivocal the CCMP and A4E are about the why, the because for the physical city changes they describe, anchored home to that lived experience promised in the Auckland Plan. And the locked-in coupling between the place / destination train and the movement / transport train so they’re pulling each part of the city in the same direction towards that better experience for all Aucklanders. This coupling is something we’re muddling around in Wellington. We’re hedging our bets on saying explicitly what lived experiences we want to prioritise and privilege in our city centre. This means the transport planning and place planning are making (at best) vague bows in each other’s direction, with lots of hedging our bets about whether and how we’re prioritising “drive-through” vs “go-to” in our city centre. OK back to the presentation…] Galvanising and enabling Weeks told us that in the CCMP, when you combine the Auckland Plan’s Outcomes and the CCMP’s Transformational Moves, the product is the city centre “Opportunities”. Opportunities are projects, quite specific things, and there are quite a few listed. click on the image to have a play in the CCMP Opportunities But they’re not a set of business-case investments that clamp tunnel-vision onto ambition. They seemed to be as much illustrating the kinds of projects that would make the city centre better at giving people that great experience of Auckland living. As Weeks emphasised: “anyone can come up with an Opportunity”. (We imagine the galvanising could run like this… Hello, I’m a developer looking at buying or developing neighbouring Building X and Building Y, I can see the direction of profitable change and unprofitable change that I could make to that property, given the trajectory of change in its environment.  And I can make up a project that creates a much better laneway space between them, plus better delivery access, better stormwater handling, and augmented residential-plus-commercial uses… This bundle of investments will make me money, and enhance really well that little corner of the city – so public investment and other private are likelier to come join me… ) CCMP’s generic laneways explainer (click to expand) Lesson for Wellington: let the vision be the vision, get other activity making it reality A big lesson for Wellington, Weeks said, was to “be clear about what different plans are to do. The City Centre Masterplan sets the vision, which allows many actors to work out how to deliver its different facets, or to develop their own ideas too.” The CCMP is only the green-circled bits in this picture. CCMP: a strong whakapapa The CCMP’s technical pedigree is strong – it makes good application of internationally-accepted principles of urban physics and urban dynamics. But – as Weeks put it – if the CCMP can “see further, it’s because [it is] standing on the shoulders of giants”. Complementing the CCMP’s technical pedigree is its collective human ancestry: the people, organisations, and relationships that have coalesced around it, the support that it’s known and seen to have, and the mana that this contributes to its strong legitimacy and mandate today.  From the presentation a few points stood out on each of these… The technical pedigree of the CCMP  Weeks and Newcombe gave us a whistle-stop tour of the set of transport and urban planning documents of which the 2020 CCMP is the progeny. Auckland Unitary Plan – The supercity’s first joined up District Plan, the “rulebook” for implementing the Auckland Plan. Forced much more collaboration in planning, for everything. City Centre Future Access Study – NZTA, Ministry of Transport, Auckland Council, Treasury, Auckland Transport found the City Rail Link would blitz all other 46 options for getting people to and from the city centre. The City Rail Link (CRL) –  an underground railway link turning the city centre heavy rail terminus into a through-station, building 4 new underground stations. Doubles the number of Aucklanders with 30min access to city centre. After years of arguing, finally underway once tax was to pay 50% (thanks ATAP). Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) (2016-17, updated 2018) Auckland-region-wide (not just one bit) merit-based priority list of all the big-ticket transport projects, costed and agreed by all funders and deliverers.  Crucially: first acknowledgement by central government that Auckland couldn’t road-build its way out of its traffic problems Business Case for Walking – first quantification of the value of city centre walking to Auckland’s economy, done in 2017. [Hey “walkable capital”, where’s ours?] The creation of documents always sounds more coherent in retrospect, but Weeks and Newcombe emphasised that it’s not been a nice clean sequential progress.  Key principles of urban physics (like the role of people walking) have only been given oxygen relatively late in the sequence. The need to get tax funding to co-fund megaprojects has meant a lot of back-and-forth raruraru with central government, and between the various bits of Auckland’s council family.  And some great documents – like the Business Case for Walking mentioned above – have no official legal weight: a decision-making body can completely ignore them if it wants.  But we heard that the various documents have meant that amongst the bureaucracy and other government power-holders, there’s been an accumulation of key principles of good urban physics, akin to accumulation of organic matter. Sometimes it’s just leaves falling, but sometimes there’s a large trunk. These accumulations in the establishment’s hivemind make it much harder to go back and relitigate, as there’s been some crystallisation in the thinking. (Though, of course, as Newcombe noted, that doesn’t stop people trying!)   Access for Everyone – the complementary transport element of the City Centre Masterplan which was developed as part of the CCMP refresh – is a great example. In traditionally car-mad Auckland, the entire Auckland Council voted unanimously to begin A4E trials “enabling a decisive mode shift away from private vehicles, to make better use of finite city centre space and improve the quality of the environment.” Wow. Access For Everyone’s car-free Queen Street / Horotiu Valley with Low Traffic Neighbourhoods around. And no more driving through the city centre! The human side of CCMP’s whakapapa We heard that a major benefit of the sequence of documents was the relationships and conversations that a document creates a pretext to have.   There’s been a lot of investment in behind-the-scenes engagement, with big stakeholders in the city. This has paid off in an unusual level of big players’ trust and buy-in to the vision and the big moves to get there. From large developers, through Heart of the City (the inner city Business Improvement District), through the AA, NZTA, to the City Centre Residents’ Group  (fun fact: 40,000 people live in Auckland’s city centre alone). This good stakeholder engagement bears fruit: it enabled councillors to support the 2020 CCMP relatively easily, despite it having relatively little engagement from the wider public (a few hundred submissions compared with the Unitary Plan’s ~10,000). It’s not a coincidence that Precinct Properties has seen fit to drop a billion (with a B) dollars of its shareholders’ money into the Commercial Bay development – Weeks observed that it’s on the strength of the new trust and joined-up thinking developed through the CCMP process.  Daniel Newcombe spoke from experience about the collaboration that had eventually started to come, once “you can get people to stop introducing competing plans” and come together. Sometimes this requires biding your time, working by osmosis, and finding the sensible individuals in an organisation on whom to work, and building coalitions that chip away at antipathetic organisations. Getting people to issue formal letters of support on behalf of their organisations can be extremely powerful, he said. Iwi influence  We heard that one major improvement of the 2020 refreshed CCMP over the 2012 original is the inclusion of Māori outcomes. For the refresh, the ADO worked closely in partnership with Auckland’s Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to develop a Māori outcomes plan. This work shaped Transformational Move 1: Māori Outcomes, with proposals for a papa kōkiri at the waterfront and a whare tāpere at Aotea Square.  The 2020 CCMP manifests the Auckland Plan’s Māori Identity and Wellbeing outcome and Te Aranga Māori Design Principles via Outcome 1: Tāmaki Makaurau – Our place in the world. It sets out the big interventions and systemic changes to bring mana whenua presence, Māori identity and life into the city centre and waterfront.  There are some big-ticket, high-visibility things and pervasive, interwoven ones. To our (Pākehā) ears this sounded pretty great…  Attack of the roadcones! Plans are essential, but how do you get them going, especially when there’s so many large, cumbersome players with inertia?  Weeks had peppered the presentation with cool before-and-after shots of some iconic Auckland changes, including Te Ara i Whiti / the (pink) LightPath, and localised street improvements like our favourite, O’Connell Street (below). O’Connell Street. oh.yes.melbourne We know (though the webinar didn’t go in depth here) that much of Auckland city centre’s evolution that you and I can see today was driven by the Auckland Design Office, with Auckland Transport and Auckland Council partners. Their projects opened people’s eyes to how good street change could be done, and that actually the good “urban physics” did apply in Auckland too. And they gave Auckland council family a chance to practice delivering street change together, and figure out how it can be done without anyone losing an eye.  They did it with a combination of a figurehead / champion / lightning rod / air cover for the ground troops (AKA Ludo-Campbell-Reid) plus a ninja team of designers, engagers and doers, doing on-the-ground projects that brought to life the good practice of urban design.    Projects like Fort Street, O’Connell Street, Fort Lane, and Jean Batten Place showed that – contrary to received wisdom – replacement of on-street car parking with high-quality streetscape was good for business. Collaboration with Auckland Transport led to the creation of a pop-up cycleway along Quay Street (well before the Innovating Streets for People pilots) which is now being incorporated into a permanent street redesign that will finish this year.  It’s not been an easy road: by now, ten pilots of the street changes for Access for Everyone were supposed to be underway, following that unanimous Council vote, but just one (High Street) has been. And the ADO has now been disbanded, allegedly due to their irritating conservative parts of the establishment with cost-cutting as a pretext.  But there’s momentum now…  Auckland’s changing, and has lessons for us  Throughout the session the Zoom chat pane had been running hot with questions and comments from the “floor” (aka the online audience). Weeks and Newcombe took questions from the pane and from the Urbanerds presenters, and a few highlights stood out including lessons for Pōneke… Lesson for Wellington: get partners on the same transport page Weeks’ and Newcombe’s first lesson was to get a multi agency agreement on transport together. It can’t just be the city council or regional council. It has to have central government buy-in; they can’t be pulling in the other direction from the city or region with their ambitions for the city’s transport. Updated ATAP, with all the partners This consensus shifts the conversation from “Do we need that good stuff replacing the bad stuff?” to “When do we need it?”. You have to keep the focus at that “when” level, not allowing relitigation of the fundamental principle of urban physics that you’ve achieved consensus on. We wonder: is this LGWM? Is it shifting our conversation? Is NZTA pulling in the same direction as the city, as the regional council?   Lesson for Wellington: generate the brochure, together A second big lesson is that you have to have the vision, the brochure, the clear picture of the good life that your city wants to give everyone who’s in the city centre, whatever they’re doing there. This has to be the rationale for any the physical changes that you entertain or consider. The Auckland Plan’s 8 outcomes – promises of the experience of life in Auckland, that the CCMP too must deliver This “brochure” must be developed hand in glove with the actors we want to be supporting it, building on any public mandate you already have but not driven by the wider public. This conversation with the big players should not feel like it’s led by any one player (developers, or transport-planners, or inner-city-residents, or businesses – nor even, we wonder, council?). What it must be is very good quality engagement that builds a strong trust and instils a foundation layer of commitment to (or at least grudging acknowledgement of) solid urban physics, and the trajectory of change needed throughout the city.    Lesson for Wellington: CBDs are doomed Listener Sally asked whether a focus on a city centre had been overtaken by COVID and its boost to working from home, and localism, especially in Wellington where there’s such a large commuter population. Weeks’ answer put it in much more professional terms, but the message came through clearly: if your city centre is mostly a Central Business District, where “business” is the dominant activity, it’s doomed. Monocultures always make a system vulnerable to shocks, in agriculture, horticulture and in cities If it’s a central city, with a hundred or a thousand different reasons for people of all different walks of life to be there, then it’ll be fine – it’ll change and adapt, but the power of people wanting to be there is the lifeblood of a city. “The death of the city has been predicted since the invention of the city, in the Bronze Age” Weeks observed – “and if you’ve got an actual city, it won’t happen.” We wonder… how much of Wellington’s central city is a dead zone by 6.30pm? How much are we reinvigorating and diversifying the reasons to be there?   Lesson for Wellington: lock all good plans to something with teeth Weeks emphasised that the power of these plans comes from linking area plans and other non-statutory plans to ones with statutory power.  So despite being a non-statutory document, the City Centre Masterplan carries weight because they mapped its outcomes tightly against the Auckland Plan (the statutory 30-year plan for the whole city) and councillors have voted overwhelmingly in favour of it. diagram showing how the CCMP is making good on the Auckland Plan’s promises, in the city centre We definitely don’t yet have the vision and its trust, nor the solid hook between statutory and non-statutory … but we have some elements of the recipe.    We wonder… how much of the CCMP-style whakapapa do we have, if not the actual document?  Could we build these levels of trust and vision together?  Some Wellington City Council planning and design gurus attended the session and helpfully fielded some questions about where Wellington was at. Our one-liner summary was: it’s not going to hell in a handcart, but it’s definitely all up in the air. Smart engagement from Urbanerds listeners and Talk Wellington readers is really needed. We’ll pick up “so what for us?” in the next post. Here’s the video: link, passcode SUa&tOC5 Meantime… where have you seen signs of a clear vision of good Wellington city life, for everyone?
      • Accepted from Talk Wellington posts 2 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • draft-spatial-plan
      • supercity
      • waterfront
      • cycleway
      • covid-19
      • libraries
      • convention-center

    • COVID-19’s effect on assisted reproduction
      • 1 Sep 2020
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • New Zealand's rules for assisted reproduction need to be re-assessed in light of the pandemic closing down international travel and access to options overseas, writes Associate Professor Rhonda Shaw.
      • Accepted from VUW News feed 2 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19
      • Victoria University of Wellington, Waiteata Road, Aro Valley, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand/Aotearoa


    • Covid rugby commentator a hit at Wellington College
      • 1 Sep 2020
      • Wellington Club Weekly
      • Andrena Patterson at work live streaming and commentating Wellington College’s games and inset, with Hurricane Ngani Laumape and with friend and Harbour Hawks Highlander Patelesio Tomkinson. By Adam Julian When Radio Sport made the decision to cut local rugby broadcasting this year there was genuine concern about how much coverage the game would receive. Add...
      • Accepted from Club Weekly 2020 3 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19
      • rugby

    • August Update from DCM
      • 31 Aug 2020
      • Downtown Community Ministry
      • 96 August Update from DCM p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; font-family:inherit !important; 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} } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; } } Together we can end homelessness When this is all over, what would you like to do differently? In our last update, we shared with you some of our taumai’s* reflections on the challenges and the positives of the COVID lock-down. Taumai also reflected on the future, and what they might like to do differently. DCM open but doing things differently at alert level 2, August 2020 Taumai spoke about the difference being housed – in emergency housing or a permanent whare – had made, and their desire to sustain this:   “No going back onto the streets” “Stay committed to the process - settle down, look at me!” “Stay in a home, and we can do it because we have done it here.” Some of the things taumai spoke about doing differently after lock-down were focused on habits they did not wish to return to, while others identified new habits or skills they wish to focus on. “I will try not to go begging; that habit”  “Hopefully go out more and be more assertive about finding work, or studying”  “I want to do some exercise” “I want to keep buying groceries and cooking – it’s a good habit” “Try to do more – access services myself because I was not aware of what support I could get, but now I do.”   As we in Aotearoa have moved back in to COVID-related restrictions this month, here at DCM we can celebrate having so many of our taumai safe and warm in their own homes or emergency housing. <!-- --> I absolutely love working at DCM Would you, or someone who you know, like to come to work with us here at DCM? We are currently advertising for several kaimahi roles here. This is a great place to work – but don’t just take our word for it! Alex Talivai started at DCM last October. This week, she shared her experience and reflections with us, including the things she has most enjoyed about working here:   Every day is different. I love the variety. I love the challenging personalities of our taumai. I enjoy seeing the regulars in the morning. I absolutely love my colleagues here at DCM. I love that DCM and our leaders are all open to change and to kōrero; we can question and discuss things, make suggestions, do things differently. I enjoy the waiata and karakia in the morning – it really does prepare us for the day – and again at the end of the day. It is cleansing, an opportunity to release the day, not take things home with you.   We asked Alex what she would say to anyone considering coming to work at DCM. She replied:   If you have a heart for it, go for it!! To put it bluntly, if you don’t take up an opportunity to be part of this team, you are a fool! You really can make a difference to someone’s life.   You can read Alex’s story here. For more information about the roles we are recruiting for, click here. Please share these opportunities widely! We really need people with big hearts to work alongside our taumai, supporting them to thrive in their homes and their lives. <!-- --> Thank you, Wellington! “Together we can end homelessness” – every month we are lifted up by the support DCM and our taumai receive from the people of Wellington. Last week, we were contacted by Pat who offered to make masks for our taumai. We have been giving these out, and including them with food support deliveries. Taumai can now use public transport, and are able to feel confident in other spaces where there are groups of people. We are also housing several people each week – moving them in to their own homes. Prue purchased some brand new linen as a house-warming gift for one of these taumai. If you would like to provide a gift of new linen for another taumai, please keep the docket so that we can provide you with a receipt for tax purposes. *We call the people we work with taumai, meaning to settle. This reflects the journey we embark on together to become settled, stable and well. <!-- --> Please help us get the message out there! Forward this email on to everyone you can think of who may be interested in how to respond to homelessness, and just generally people who are passionate about Wellington. <!-- --> Support DCM! Nāku te rourou, nāu te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi With your basket and my basket, the people will thrive <!-- --> Copyright © 2020 DCM. All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: DCMPO Box 6133Marion SqWellington, Wellington 6011 New ZealandAdd us to your address book Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
      • Accepted from DCM alerts archive 3 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Central Opens 2020 – CANCELLED
      • 31 Aug 2020
      • Hutt Valley Fencing Club
      • Hawkes Bay Blades were planning on running the Central Opens tournament on 10th and 11th October this year. However, given the ever changing situation we find ourselves in with COVID-19 Alert Levels, it has been decided to cancel the event this year. It is with regret that we make this decision and we look forward to running this tournament next year.
      • Accepted from Hutt Valley Fencing Club feed 3 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • Whiria Project: Major VUW Restructure in the Works, But With Great Push Back
      • 30 Aug 2020
      • Salient
      • Te Aorewa Rolleston | Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi te Rangi | She/Her <figure class=" sqs-block-image-figure intrinsic " > Victoria University of Wellington is proposing a substantial restructure plan named the ‘Whiria Project’—which translates as “to plait” or weave. The proposal has come as a surprise to many staff and has largely been met with resistance, particularly from unionised staff. The 30 page discussion document seen by Salient also lacks substantial focus on student experience and engagement.  According to senior leadership, the proposal is the University’s effort to “adapt” to the current times with the economic impact of COVID-19 a significant feature of the discussion document.  The discussion document outlines a series of significant changes across the entire structure of the University which will impact students, staff, schools of learning, and senior leadership.  Key areas of focus within the document include: Dividing and sectioning the current three tier organisational structure to make it more fluid and efficient Aligning the current academic systems to the strategic plan focusing on a global, civic university Examining ways to incorporate values of Te Tiriti o Waitangi more centrally Increasing communication and engagement within the institution  Managing the financial stability and cost savings of the university. The proposal has been met with great pushback from stakeholders, highlighting the need for consistent communication and transparency from the University.  Salient spoke to VUWSA about their contribution and participation in the Whiria project and whether they believed there had been sufficient consultation.  Acting President of VUWSA, Taylah Shuker said they, alongside the Student Academic Committee, were "disappointed with the level of consultation from the University about the Whiria project." Shuker also confirmed that VUWSA had to actively seek documents and facilitate consultation, adding that “if students had been approached early on it would have shown a commitment to students as partners and acknowledged the potential affects this project has on them.” VUWSA understands there is no intention to hold specific student consultation.  As a result, “VUWSA has requested an executive summary of the Whiria discussion document (shorter than the 28 pages to make it more accessible for students), with clear communication on how students can submit feedback.” At the time of publication, VUWSA had not received a summary. As well as consultation with students and student representatives, there were also concerns expressed for academic and administrative staff.  Several VUW staff have spoken to wider media explaining that staff were already feeling exhausted and stressed and that the recently revealed discussion document was worrying.  Tutor and doctorate student, Erica Cassie told Salient that many tutors have been sharing their concerns around the University's decision making. She said the insufficient consultation has caused many tutors to fear for their job security.  Cassie said, “The first time I actually saw the document was when it was released to staff a few days ago.”  “There haven’t been discussions in our school and there hasn’t been a great amount of information sent to me either as a tutor or as a postgraduate student.” “It’s really hard to pass the document, it does not make sense to most people.” “Staff are focussed on trying to teach and support students through all the ongoing disruptions of this year - now is not the time to be piling on still more uncertainty and the prospect of job cuts.” Co-President of the Tertiary Education Union VUW Branch, Dougal McNeill, said that "It is astounding that, in the middle of an ongoing global pandemic, the University's senior leadership should think this a good time to initiate wide-ranging and ill-thought-out restructuring.” McNeill added that the further centralisation and concentration of power Whiria proposes “will be bad for students and staff. It's more of the same tired managerialism that has served higher education so poorly over the past decades. And it would have to result in job losses.”  He stresses that students and staff “need more connection, support and interaction as a community of learners, not still further powers given to an ever-growing centre.” Union members joined in what were some of the biggest union meetings in years to have their say on this project.  McNeill states The Whiria Project needs to be withdrawn, “and the Vice Chancellor and Provost need to work urgently to try and restore trust and relationship with University staff."  Salient spoke to Deputy Vice Chancellor Māori,  Professor Rawinia Higgins about the proposal and the contribution the Māori community have had in the proposal’s intentions.  “As we were trying to weave together a number of different reports that we had done over time, Whiria was really trying to put that into a discussion document.”  “In terms of the Māori part of that, I was very much involved and Dr Ocean Mercier (Te Kawa a Maui) was included.”  Professor Higgins explained that this was a kaupapa where Māori were definitely involved and that it was an opportunity to look ahead at how the university will function in the future. Professor Higgins went on further to explain that she was confident with the support being facilitated by the leadership team in centralising the iho of the university, the marae complex and normalising Te Reo Māori. In regard to engaging and consulting tauira, Professor Higgins said that “to my understanding, people within their respective communities are engaging with their representatives.”  “I had the Ngāi Tauira (Māori Student’s Association) representatives join me in a Zui and assume they will engage their student bodies. I have said that I am happy to talk if they want me to.” The discussion document recommends giving Te Kawa a Māui more prominence in the new structure as a means to upholding Te Tiriti. In statement the University responded to Salient’s request for comment on the Whiria Project and the concerns being felt by students and staff.  “The document released is a discussion document not a proposal. It offers some high-level draft recommendations simply to help clarify, challenge and progress thinking prior to consultation.  The document was put together by the Senior Leadership Team after discussions with those whose roles could be affected by changes to the academic structure, namely SLT Members, Deans, Associate Deans and Heads of School.” “The discussion document was developed by the people whose roles could be affected by changes to the academic structure.  This week’s issue of Whītiki—our student newsletter—will include an item directing students to a Whiria project webpage and the discussion document.” Students and staff have been given until the 14th September to provide feedback on the Whiria Project following which a report will be released sharing those responses. Students are invited to contribute feedback via email to whiriafeedback@vuw.ac.nz The full discussion document (pictured above) is now available on the University's website.
      • Accepted from Salient feed 2020 2 weeks ago by tonytw1
      • Tagged as:
      • consultation
      • covid-19

    • Lodge Update – Our Maunga – August 2020
      • 27 Aug 2020
      • Wellington Tramping and Mountainneering Club
      • Unfortunately, due to that Covid beast our lodge is at present closed again until we move back to level 1. The date at present for that is Monday 7th September but that could change either way so lots of fingers crossed. The reason we are closed is due to no staff to cook and clean ... Read more
      • Accepted from WTMC news 2020 3 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19

    • From the President … in August
      • 27 Aug 2020
      • Wellington Tramping and Mountainneering Club
      • Moving back to Alert Level 2 earlier this month has presented many challenges to the club. We’ve really appreciated everyone’s understanding and flexibility as we continue to navigate our way through our COVID-19 impacted world. It’s been difficult for the club having to close or halt some things for a short period of time but ... Read more
      • Accepted from WTMC news 2020 3 weeks ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • covid-19


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