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Transport / Basin Reserve flyover

Basin Reserve pitch, Buckle Street, Te Aro, Wellington, Wellington City, Wellington, 6011, New Zealand (OpenStreetMap)

The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) are planning to build a huge concrete flyover across the northern side of the Basin Reserve.

Basin Reserve flyover related newsitems

    • Zero fossil fuel powered vehicles in Wellington City by 2040: Councillor Roger Blakeley’s presentation to the 2018 Save the Basin Campaign AGM
      • 3 Dec 2018
      • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • (Note: The view expressed in this presentation are Councillor Blakeley’s personal and professional views, not those of Greater Wellington Regional Council) by Tim Jones Another year has gone by, and we still don’t know what will be in the Let’s Get Wellington Moving Recommended Programme of Investment – in other words, the Ngauranga to Airport transport plan that we’ve been awaiting for the last three years. It often seems as though the whole thing will end up as a messy political compromise. But what if the guiding principles were such things as: making Wellington liveable making Wellington fair, safe and healthy making Wellington beautiful, vibrant and culturally rich? And what if, in place of Let’s Get Welly Moving’s continued refusal to treat the climate change impact of its plans as a key or even important factor, a central goal of their work was to ensure zero greenhouse gas emissions from Wellington transport by 2040? Does that sound like a pipe dream? It isn’t. Because Councillor Roger Blakeley, with input from a number of people with community expertise in Wellington transport, has come up with a plan to do all that and more. And he presented it to the 2018 Save the Basin Campaign Annual General Meeting: Essentials of a 21st Century Transport Strategy We encourage you to read it. We encourage you to think about it. And we encourage you to support it – or, if you wish, suggest further improvements. It’s great to see one of our elected representatives engaging in detail with the work that needs to be done to make Wellington a city fit for its residents – and fit for the future. Thanks, Roger!  
      • Accepted from Save the Basin posts 19 months ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • electric-vehicles

    • Taking The Wheel: The Government Makes More Moves To Rebalance Transport
      • 3 Jul 2018
      • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • As Wellington waits for an announcement in its transport future, the Government is continuing to make moves to reshape transport in New Zealand away from over-reliance on the private car and towards a balanced system that gives as many people as possible options for getting off the roads: The new Government Policy Statement on Land Transport represents a significant change away from the previous Government’s motorway-dominated transport priorities, as Isabella Cawthorn explains on Talk Wellington. On Newshub, Thomas Coughlan says that public transport is the big winner in the new strategy. The previous National-led Government was completely impervious to the well-accepted research finding that adding new capacity encourages more people into cars. The news that the Government is considering tolling Transmission Gully to help prevent this is an encouraging sign that the feared flood of additional cars into Wellington from the North may not materialise. While we wait to see whether the Government’s new, balanced approach will succeed in cutting Wellington’s motorway-building cabal off at the pass, why not find out how another seaside city, Vancouver, has succeeded in making its transport system work for people, not the other way around?
      • Accepted from Save the Basin posts 19 months ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • transmissiongully

    • A possible Basin Reserve flyover has emerged again in a new “surprise survey” from LGWM
      • 5 May 2018
      • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • The Save the Basin Campaign Inc has written the following letter in response to the new Let’s Get Welly Moving “surprise survey” which LGWM chose not to notify stakeholder groups, such as Save the Basin, about: The STBC, as a stakeholder group in the LGWM consultation process, takes strong issue with your organisation on a number of matters in relation to the existence of this survey: The survey has taken everyone at STBC by complete surprise. What is the purpose of the survey and who has it been distributed to? There was no prior notification to STBC (as a stakeholder) that LGWM would be commissioning the survey and it was only by chance that a member of the STBC committee was alerted to its existence. This is alarming and shows a complete lack of transparency and questions the validity of the survey. The process for public engagement on the LGWM scenarios closed in November last year – and in March this year LGWM released the summary of the feedback process on future transport scenarios for Wellington. Your website currently says “We’re using the feedback from the November 2017 public engagement to help guide our work as we develop a recommended programme of investment.” However, you continue to be asking for more views and ideas through this latest survey – with no information about this available to the public through your website. Of great concern is the fact the survey implies that a bridge/fly-over around the Basin Reserve is still an option – especially in the way the questions are constructed and presented.  For example in relation to design, one survey respondent said that the preferences for infrastructure around the Basin gave options for a bridge or tunnel on one page – suggesting that there were only two options – then on the next page the last part of this question appeared offering an at grade option. Although we are not circulating the survey to our members to complete, we know that others who have been alerted to the survey may.  If the survey was designed to be filled in by certain individuals or organisations, either targeted or randomly selected, the results will be invalidated if others complete it.  No-one should trust the results of this survey. We would appreciate a response to this email. [etc]
      • Accepted from Save the Basin posts 30 months ago
      • Tagged as:
      • consultation

    • Now With Speaker Details: Public Meeting: For A More Liveable Wellington, Monday 28 August
      • 22 Aug 2017
      • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • Our speakers are: Roger Blakeley: Introduction – Let’s Get Welly Moving’s principles and objectives   Paula Warren: The sustainable transport hierarchy and why LGWM’s outcomes should reflect it   Barry Mein (LGWM): LGWM’s progress towards meeting its objectives   Russell Tregonning: Transport, climate change and public health: transport choices are health choices   When: Monday 28 August, doors open 5.30pm, 6pm sharp start, 7.30pm close Where: Wellington Central Library, Mezzanine Floor Meeting Room All welcome to hear how sustainable transport design for Wellington benefits everyone—walkers, cyclists, public transport users, and drivers—reducing traffic volumes, lowering carbon emissions, and making a healthier city. Doors open 5.30 for 6pm sharp start. We’ll hear from our speakers, then have a panel discussion, with time for one-on-one discussions afterwards. Facebook event.
      • Accepted from Save the Basin posts 19 months ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • libraries

    • Sore Losers: Nick Smith and the Government Water Down the Environmental Legal Assistance Fund
      • 7 Jul 2017
      • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • The rules of the Ministry for the Environment’s Environmental Legal Assistance Fund, which groups including Save the Basin have used to help fund legal challenges to infrastructure projects, have now been changed so that such applications can be arbitrarily declined, by: The inclusion of a new criterion to consider whether providing ELA funding to the applicant for its involvement in the legal proceedings, will contribute to impeding or delaying the ability of people and communities to provide for their social, economic and cultural well-being in relation to important needs, including employment, housing and infrastructure.   I was rung by a Stuff journalist about this and responded on behalf of Save the Basin: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/94323541/quiet-change-to-public-fund-for-environmental-legal-challenges A subsequent exchange in Question Time (see below) makes it very clear that Nick Smith had the Government’s Basin Reserve flyover defeat in mind when he made this move. Nick Smith and the Government appear to think that fits of pique make good public policy. We beg to differ. Question Time 9. EUGENIE SAGE (Green) to the Minister for the Environment: By how much has annual funding for the Environmental Legal Assistance Fund been cut since 2013/14? Hon Dr NICK SMITH (Minister for the Environment): The budget this year is $600,000 per year, as it was last year and the year before. For the 4 years prior to that the budget was $800,000 per year but was repeatedly underspent. The spend in 2013-14 was $555,000, and the average actual spend was $520,000. As much as I like the Minister of Finance, I do not like under-spending my vote so I reduced the budget in 2015-16 and transferred it to increased support for collaborative processes. This is also consistent with our blue-green philosophy of supporting people to find solutions rather than spending it on legal aid to fight disputes. Eugenie Sage: Can he confirm that he created a new criterion for the fund recently so that community groups wanting to challenge council decisions in the courts are likely to be denied funding if their case might “impede or delay” a development project? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: Yes, I have changed the criteria. A new consideration is the issue of housing and infrastructure. The Government makes no apologies for making it harder for groups to get Government money to stop houses and infrastructure from being built. It does not prevent funding being provided in those sorts of cases, but it requires the panel to give consideration to the broader public interest. It simply does not make sense for the Government to be using public money to stop transport projects being built and stop houses being built with legal aid funding. Eugenie Sage: Does he believe that Forest & Bird would have received funding to mount a legal challenge to Bathurst Resources’ proposed coalmine on the Denniston plateau if this new criterion had been in place? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: There is an independent panel that makes the decisions on the issue of the legal aid. What I have added to the criteria is that, alongside the environmental things, issues like infrastructure, jobs, and housing have to be a consideration. But it still will be an independent consideration for the panel. Eugenie Sage: Can he confirm that last year he gave himself the power to decide which cases and which community groups would get environmental legal aid, stripping this power away from the Ministry for the Environment’s chief executive? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: Each year Ministers make a decision about the level of delegations. In this particular case, I decided not to delegate to the Ministry for the Environment, albeit I note that I followed the panel’s advice in every case. In the event that I do not follow the panel’s advice it will be a matter of open public record. Eugenie Sage: Why will he not just own the fact that his Government is trying to stop legal challenges that might impede environmentally destructive development, like the coalmine on the Denniston plateau, the Ruataniwha Dam, and the Basin Reserve flyover? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: I know of many Wellingtonians who would be concerned that the Government was spending money on stopping roading through to the airport being constructed with legal aid funds. So the Government has deliberately put into the environmental legal aid criteria that the panel needs to consider issues like infrastructure and housing. To quote the Minister for Infrastructure: “We are the infrastructure Government.”, and we want to see New Zealanders being able to get around and have a roof over their heads.9. EUGENIE SAGE (Green) to the Minister for the Environment: By how much has annual funding for the Environmental Legal Assistance Fund been cut since 2013/14? Hon Dr NICK SMITH (Minister for the Environment): The budget this year is $600,000 per year, as it was last year and the year before. For the 4 years prior to that the budget was $800,000 per year but was repeatedly underspent. The spend in 2013-14 was $555,000, and the average actual spend was $520,000. As much as I like the Minister of Finance, I do not like under-spending my vote so I reduced the budget in 2015-16 and transferred it to increased support for collaborative processes. This is also consistent with our blue-green philosophy of supporting people to find solutions rather than spending it on legal aid to fight disputes. Eugenie Sage: Can he confirm that he created a new criterion for the fund recently so that community groups wanting to challenge council decisions in the courts are likely to be denied funding if their case might “impede or delay” a development project? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: Yes, I have changed the criteria. A new consideration is the issue of housing and infrastructure. The Government makes no apologies for making it harder for groups to get Government money to stop houses and infrastructure from being built. It does not prevent funding being provided in those sorts of cases, but it requires the panel to give consideration to the broader public interest. It simply does not make sense for the Government to be using public money to stop transport projects being built and stop houses being built with legal aid funding. Eugenie Sage: Does he believe that Forest & Bird would have received funding to mount a legal challenge to Bathurst Resources’ proposed coalmine on the Denniston plateau if this new criterion had been in place? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: There is an independent panel that makes the decisions on the issue of the legal aid. What I have added to the criteria is that, alongside the environmental things, issues like infrastructure, jobs, and housing have to be a consideration. But it still will be an independent consideration for the panel. Eugenie Sage: Can he confirm that last year he gave himself the power to decide which cases and which community groups would get environmental legal aid, stripping this power away from the Ministry for the Environment’s chief executive? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: Each year Ministers make a decision about the level of delegations. In this particular case, I decided not to delegate to the Ministry for the Environment, albeit I note that I followed the panel’s advice in every case. In the event that I do not follow the panel’s advice it will be a matter of open public record. Eugenie Sage: Why will he not just own the fact that his Government is trying to stop legal challenges that might impede environmentally destructive development, like the coalmine on the Denniston plateau, the Ruataniwha Dam, and the Basin Reserve flyover? Hon Dr NICK SMITH: I know of many Wellingtonians who would be concerned that the Government was spending money on stopping roading through to the airport being constructed with legal aid funds. So the Government has deliberately put into the environmental legal aid criteria that the panel needs to consider issues like infrastructure and housing. To quote the Minister for Infrastructure: “We are the infrastructure Government.”, and we want to see New Zealanders being able to get around and have a roof over their heads.
      • Accepted from Save the Basin posts 7 months ago by feedreader
      • Tagged as:
      • water
      • government
      • airport
      • wellington
      • art
      • housing
      • sport
      • people


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    • Save the Basin Reserve!
      • The Basin Reserve is one of the world's iconic cricket grounds, and New Zealand's oldest dedicated cricket pitch. It's an oasis of green space in the heart of the capital. But there is widespread community concern about the intention of three government agencies - the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) and the Wellington City Council (WCC) - to build a huge concrete flyover across the northern side of the Basin Reserve, destroying the atmosphere of the Basin Reserve forever.
      • Tagged as:
      • cricket
      • lobbygroups
      • basinreserve

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