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    • WSSRU / CSW Secondary Schools tie resolution
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • RULES FOR TIED QUARTER-FINALS, SEMI-FINALS AND FINALS. DRAWN QUARTERS, SEMI FINALS & FINALS In all WSSRU quarter final, semi-final and final matches, if the scores are tied at the end of normal time, there is no extra time (IRB under more »

    • WRFU Club Rugby Tie resolution
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • WRFU Club Rugby WRFU By-law 6.2 SEMI-FINAL If at full-time in a SEMI-FINAL two teams are tied, then two ten minute spells will be played to determine the winner. There will be no “golden point”. If the scores are still tied more »

    • With PITA & THE WOLF screaming into a sellout, lets take a...
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Orchestra Wellington
      • With PITA & THE WOLF screaming into a sellout, lets take a closer look at our following concert SONG OF THE NIGHTINGALE and specifically its special guest Pianist Lecturer Dr Jian Liu. Chinese-American pianist Jian Liu, Lecturer in Piano at Te Kōkī, New Zealand School of Music, is a highly sought-after solo pianist, chamber musician, and educator. He has appeared on concert stages in China, Japan, Singapore, Portugal, Switzerland, Ukraine, the United States and New Zealand, and with symphony orchestras in Europe and USA.   Jian Liu’s performances have been broadcasted by various TV and radio stations including KPHO (CBS) in Phoenix, Arizona, CCTV in China, Suisse Romande Radio in Switzerland, and Radio NZ Concert in New Zealand. Phoenix New Times praised his playing as “if his life, and yours, depends upon his perfect execution”. Marlborough Express commended that “he challenged the audience to let their emotions ride with the sounds.” In 2012, Jian Liu was a guest artist for the New Zealand International Piano Festival in Auckland and undertook a 10-concert national concert tour for Chamber Music New Zealand. In 2013, he has performed the complete Debussy Etudes in both Wellington and Auckland. At age 12, Jian Liu was accepted at the prestigious Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. He moved to the United States when he was 15, and promptly won first place at the 6th Missouri Southern International Competition in 1996. Since then, Jian Liu has been honoured at various state, national, and international competitions, including the Phoenix Symphony Guilds Competition (USA) 1997, 3rd Horowitz International Piano Competition (Kiev, Ukraine) 1999, and MTNA Chamber Music Competition (USA) 2002. He has performed in many prestigious concert halls including Carnegie Hall, Steinway Hall in New York, Rose Hall of Lincoln Center, Sprague Hall and Woolsey Hall of Yale University, Paul Hall of Juilliard School, and Recital Hall of Sydney Conservatorium.  As a chamber musician, Jian Liu has featured alongside other world-class musicians such as cellist Jian Wang, clarinetist David Shifrin, flutist Ransom Wilson, Boston Symphony Orchestra cellist Alexandre Lecarme, and Yale Department of Music violinist Sarita Kwok. In 2011, represented by Chamber Music New Zealand, he toured with violinist Martin Riseley and flutist Alexa Still in major centres in New Zealand. Together with violinist Martin Riseley and cellist Inbal Megiddo, Jian Liu formed the Te Kōkī Trio. Recently, the trio has performed concerts in New Zealand, Singapore and Sydney, Australia. As an educator, Jian Liu was appointed the honorary professorship at the Qingdao University in 2012, and has given masterclasses and lectures at the Central Conservatory of Music in China, School of the Arts in Singapore, Sydney Conservatorium in Australia, as well as at Wellesley College, East Carolina University, and Yale University in the United States. From 2008 to 2010, he served as the faculty collaborative pianist at the Yale School of Music, and appointed as an instructor at Yale Department of Music. He earned his Bachelor of Music in Piano and Bachelor of Science in Business from Arizona State University, as well as Master of Music, Master of Musical Arts and Doctor of Musical Arts from Yale School of Music, under the tutelage of Claude Frank.  Tickets for SONG OF THE NIGHTINGALE are available from HERE

    • Term 3 2014 Parent Teacher Interviews
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • Parent teacher interviews will be held Monday 11 and Wednesday 13 August for years 1 to 13. Online booking will be available from Monday 4 to Sunday 10 August. read more

    • Kerry’s Fiction Picks
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Hi everyone, just a recap for those who don’t know who or what my picks are. I’m the fiction selector for Wellington City Libraries.  I spend a lot of time reading about and choosing lovely new fiction for you to enjoy.  I try to pick my favourites every week to share with you.  These books aren’t ’shelf ready’, but they are due to be published in the next six months or so.  And they are on the catalogue, available to reserve. With a friend like you Author Fanny Blake used to be an editor and a journalist so she obviously knows about what people enjoy reading.  With a friend like you is about the breakdown of a female friendship (the title gives it away doesn’t it?!)  Which is something I think we’ve all experienced at some time and that’s what made it so appealing.  The book is about two friends, Beth and Megan living in London, who are both very different, but get along wonderfully and have done for years.  Then Beth’s daughter reveals a secret which drives a wedge between the two friends.  From a happy, genuine friendship they turn to misunderstanding, arguments and then bitterness and all out war. It’s written with a lot of humor and caring (combined with Blake’s experience in the industry) and this is what sets it apart from your usual chick lit.  Blake’s previous book What women want was a quiet success too. Home place This story is both a murder mystery and a family saga.  It’s about a woman named Alma who must return home to Billings, in rural Montana, after her sister is found dead.  Alma had left behind her family years ago to live in Seattle and become a lawyer.  She had survived a car accident which killed both of her parents and the choice to flee was the easiest for her.  However, Vicky, her partying and troubled sister remained and one night drunk, she leaves a party and is found dead the next day.  Alma returns to care for her orphaned niece and soon becomes embroiled in the town’s dramas, its secrets and uncovers the possibility that her sister was murdered.  Library Journal says La Seur’s book is a “Walloping in suspense, drama, rage, and remorse, this debut is an accomplished literary novel of the new West.” Away from you This is by Kay Langdale, who’s published many a successful relationship/family lit-type novel.  Away from you focuses on mothers and it’s about Monica, who is offered a three month placement in LA for her work.  She knows she must do the best thing for her career and take the job, but it means leaving behind her children in London.  Monica hires Ursula as a housekeeper and reluctant nanny to take care of her family.  But Ursula doesn’t seem quite right and it becomes apparent there’s a dark secret in her past that keeps her cold and reserved.  Publisher Hodder and Stoughton are calling Langdale the next Jodi Piccoult – a big call!  The story does sound promising though.

    • Michael Lewis, Timothy Geithner & Arundhati Roy – popular new non fiction on our shelves!
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Here’s a quick round-up of some of our picks of the latest non-fiction in July. There are definitely some fairly weighty economics books this month, with Michael Lewis’s latest “Flash Boys” and a new book from Timothy Geithner, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. Arundhati Roy also has a new title out — enjoy! Flash boys : a Wall Street revolt / Michael Lewis. “In his latest captivating expedition into the marketplace jungle, Lewis (Moneyball) explores how the rise of computerized stock exchanges and their attendant scams started a battle for the soul of Wall Street. He probes the subterfuges of high frequency traders who, assisted by banks and brokerages happy to sell out customers, use blindingly fast data links to gain inside information on investors’ trades and then exploit them on today’s entirely digital stock markets. At the center of his novelistic narrative is a New York mosaic:… This cast bands together to expose the market manipulations and then start their own honest stock exchange.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Please, nurse! / Joan Lock. “When Joan Lock began her formal training as a young nurse in the 1950s, she was unprepared for the strict discipline and long hours which were to follow, and quickly realised she was no Florence Nightingale. Her honest and humorous account of the next three years reveals her most intimate experiences of being a nurse: from dealing with temperamental surgeons to fighting off flirtatious patients. Labelled a trouble-maker, Joan and her friends tested their strict Sisters’ patience as they climbed through windows, slept through lectures and broke every thermometer that passed through their hands. But through it all, Joan found herself touched by the people she met and their heart-warming stories.” (Syndetics summary) The good spy : the life and death of Robert Ames / Kai Bird. “Pulitzer Prize-winning author Bird… presents CIA intelligence officer Robert Ames (1934-83) as a serious intellectual, a devoted family man, and a hardworking, idealistic professional. After preparing readers for Ames’s death in the massive 1983 bombing of the American embassy in Beirut, Bird takes us back through Ames’s development as an expert in Arabic languages, history, and politics who increasingly focused on the Arab-Israeli conflict. By 1980, he was a recognized policy advisor within the CIA, state department, and White House. Bird interweaves his subject’s commitment to finding a solution to the Palestine dilemma with tracking the mounting unrest in Lebanon and increasing terrorism by Palestinians, Israelis, and militant Shiites. Readers are drawn to Ames and his effort to be a “good spy,” building solutions, even as the U.S. government, buffeted by partisan pressures, adhered to no one constructive policy…” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Things a little bird told me : confessions of the creative mind / Biz Stone. “Twitter cofounder Stone dropped out of college to design book jackets, just one of the quirky turns of fate that set him on a nonlinear path to social-media entrepreneurship. He recounts having enough chutzpah to call himself a genius when he suffered lack of confidence and direction, enough audacity to ask for a job at Google on the strength of his experience as a blogger when he lacked a college degree, never mind a PhD in computer science. He and Evan Williams, who joined Google after selling Blogger, later left the relative safety of Google to start several ventures, most of which failed, before developing Twitter. While chronicling his setbacks and successes, Stone offers solid advice and inspiration: opportunity can be manufactured, creativity is a renewable resource, embrace constraints, failures can be assets, asking questions is free, empathy is essential to success.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Capitalism : a ghost story / Arundhati Roy. “…Roy’s… book begins with Karl Marx’s quip that capitalism is like a sorcerer’s apprentice, conjuring forces too strong for it to control. She labels these apprentices as America’s multinational corporations and the various organizations that act as tentacles, disrupting the cultures, economies, and governments of the world. Prominent in the list are endowed foundations like those started by Ford and Rockefeller, which transformed the fortunes of the US’s most successful magnates into political influence by funding the beginnings of the U.N., the CIA, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Research and Development (RAND) Corporation. Roy traces the links between these groups and the co-optation of social science research, using NGOs to soften the politics of radical social movements in the face of IMF-imposed structural adjustment, and the separation of feminist and class analysis in mainstream political discussions. Roy’s central concern is the effect on her own country, and she shows how Indian politics have taken on the same model, leading to the ghosts of her book’s title: 250,000 farmers have committed suicide, 800 million impoverished and dispossessed Indians, environmental destruction, colonial-like rule in Kashmir, and brutal treatment of activists and journalists. In this dark tale, Roy gives rays of hope that illuminate cracks in the nightmare she evokes.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Everyday sexism / Laura Bates. “After experiencing a series of escalating sexist incidents, Laura Bates, a young journalist, started a project called ‘everyday sexism’ to raise the profile of these previously untold stories. Astounded by the response she received and the wide range of stories that came pouring in from all over the world, she quickly realised that the situation was far worse than she’d initially thought. Enough was enough. From being harrassed and wolf-whistled at on the street, to discrimination in the workplace and serious sexual assault, it was clear that sexism had become normalised. Bates decided it was time for women to lead a real change. Bold, jaunty but always intelligent, ‘everyday sexism’ is a protest against inequality that provides a unique window into the vibrant movement sparked by this juggernaut of stories – often shocking, sometimes amusing and always poignant. Welcome to the fourth wave of feminism.” (Syndetics summary) Stress test : reflections on financial crises / Timothy F. Geithner. “On January 26, 2009, during the depth of the financial crisis and having just completed five years as President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Timothy F. Geithner was sworn in by President Barack Obama as the seventy-fifth Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. Now, in a strikingly candid, riveting, and historically illuminating memoir, Geithner takes readers behind the scenes during the darkest moments of the crisis. Swift, decisive, and creative action was required to avert a second Great Depression, but policy makers faced a fog of uncertainty, with no good options and the risk of catastrophic outcomes. Stress Test Reflections on Financial Crises takes us inside the room, explaining in accessible and forthright terms the hard choices and politically unpalatable decisions that Geithner and others in the Obama administration made during the crisis and recovery.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Angel investing : the Gust guide to making money and having fun investing in startups / David S. Rose. “This how-to guide is aimed at readers interested in learning more about the relatively new field of angel investing, which involves investing in a variety of private, start-up companies with high-growth potential. Entrepreneur Rose has been an angel investor for about 15 years and founded the New York Angels group and gust.com, a platform for connecting entrepreneurs and investors. His investing background proves an asset, as he takes a multidisciplinary approach. -Angel basics-such as financial skills and what to look for in a start-up company-are included, as well as more peripheral topics like funding platforms and how to become better known in the field…” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Occupy World Street : a global roadmap for radical economic and political reform / Ross Jackson ; foreword by Hazel Henderson. “Jackson, chairman of the Danish-based foundation Gaia Trust and co-editor of Gaian Economics: Living Well Within Planetary Limits, provides a comprehensive and lucidly written history of neoliberal economics and its effects, tracing the inequalities inherent in neoliberal economic planning. Neoliberalism, as Jackson illustrates, isn’t an inevitable historical development, but rather an “artificial construct” created by people with a self-serving strategy that neglects the rest of humanity. Jackson presents the fundamental flaws in modern economics, locates the turning point in regulation and economic behavior, and then shows how and why things have devolved to their current state through the actions of the IMF and WTO. He traces a new, emergent worldview, proposing a solution in the form of a Gaian economic system, in which smaller, decentralized, diverse communities with a degree of local democracy form the proposed utopia, in contrast to the branded neoliberal free market of corporate dreams. A return to a simpler, more satisfying, and sustainable lifestyle is both necessary and inevitable, Jackson argues. (adapted from Syndetics summary) Sustainable revolution : permaculture in ecovillages, urban farms, and communities worldwide / Juliana Birnbaum & Louis Fox. “Urban gardeners. Seed-saving collectives. Intentional communities. Renewable energy innovators and proponents of gift economies. How are these seemingly disparate groups connected? Based on common ethics of sustainable cultures throughout history, the ecological design systems of permaculture is the common thread that weaves them into a powerful, potentially revolutionary – or evolutionary – movement. Sustainable Revolution features photographs, interviews, and essays profiling 60 thriving community-based projects in diverse climates across the planet…(adapted from Syndetics summary) Poison spring : the secret history of pollution and the EPA / E.G. Vallianatos with McKay Jenkins. “Vallianatos, after a 25-year stint at the Environmental Protection Agency, pulls back the curtain on the watchdog agency’s failure to guard public safety and monitor land use due to steady erosion of its enforcement practices. With environmental journalist Jenkins he blasts the EPA’s ineptitude since its 1970 inception, intensely pressured as it is by politicians and corporations to approve the use of synthetic chemicals without proper testing-”biologic death bombs” in the air, water, and in our bodies. The EPA, through its Congressional mandate, enforces more than a dozen environmental laws, yet it has approved hundreds of pesticides that have been used unnecessarily, excessively, or which have been outright abused, the book contends. Vallianatos does give the agency credit for the hard-fought ban on DDT that was opposed by the chemical companies and pesticide apologists. He also explores the causes of the dwindling honeybee population and the loss of the traditional family farms to the aggressive corporate giants, as well as the repression of EPA whistleblowers squashed by a code of silence and lack of access to information. (adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Haere rā OurSpace
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • On Sunday we’ll be saying goodbye to our multimedia exhibition OurSpace to make room for the next exciting step towards Te Papa’s flagship exhibition commemorating 100 years since WWI. We are incredibly grateful to everyone who has contributed images and videos to OurSpace, which opened in 2008. More than 10,000 images and videos were provided so they could be... Read more »

    • Arohatia te Reo: learning 50 kupu hou (new Māori words) – Te Reo and WWI research
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • In honour of Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori, here are a number of kupu Māori (Māori words) that I constantly use in my everyday mahi/work as a curator at Te Papa, and especially in my research for the First World War exhibition we are presently developing. Many of the sources written in te reo Māori that date... Read more »

    • The art of creating – new craft books in July
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Ikebana, the old Japanese art of arranging flowers, has remained popular for hundred of years and is loved by many for its natural beauty, simplicity and spirituality. I’ve cherished the Ikebana demonstrations offered by my aunt Mary to her students and often, to charitable organisations for women. My aunt had an amazing talent putting together stunning flower arrangements and at the same time explaining the history and philosophy of the Ikebana art. All her special arrangements were created with plants and flowers from her delightful home garden and she was very proud of Ikebana. Find out more about this unique Japanese art in the book ‘Japanese Ikebana for every season’, featured in this collection of our latest library arrivals, and enjoy these picks of our new craft books! Japanese ikebana for every season / Rie Imai and Yuji Ueno ; photography by Noboru Murata. ” The true meaning of Ikebana–the traditional Japanese art of flower arrangement–is the ability to take a few beautiful flowers and plans and tastefully present them in very simple containers to decorate your home. Whether for Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day, or a special birthday or anniversary–”Japanese Ikebana for Every Season” simplifies and demystifies this ancient art by presenting 53 elegantly simple arrangements that anyone can create at anytime at home. No matter what time of year it is and regardless of your taste or budget–the arrangements in this book will lend a touch of Japanese elegance to your home.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Floral knits : 25 contemporary flower-inspired designs / Martin Storey ; photographs by Steven Wooster. “Flower power fuels this collection of 25 knitted accessories, sweaters, and home decor wares. Knitwear designer Storey (Aran Knits) focuses on creating flowers with texture and color, whether sewn on or knitted into the pattern. The Fleur cardigan and the Tulip beret and fingerless gloves use color work to create lovely garden rows around the hems and cuffs of each project. The monochromatic Herbaceous pillow and throw turn to texture to create items for the home out of assembled knit squares. The Bloom bag and brooch make use of funky over-sized knit flowers. The cabled Blossom sweater, socks, and fingerless gloves are finished with delicate flower embroidery. The first half of the book presents the projects and the second half details the patterns. Knitters looking for exotic varietals or abstract renditions of our flowered friends should look elsewhere; this collection focuses on pictorial representations of the more familiar, much-loved domestic garden residents. ” (Publisher Weekly) Happy feet : unique knits to knock your socks off / Cathy Carron. “Popular knitwear designer Cathy Carron has gone from head (her bestselling “Hattitude”) to toe, with this unique collection of socks, stockings, legwarmers, slippers, sandal socks, and more. Perfect for advanced beginner to advanced knitters, the more than 40 fashion-forward designs offer a variety of fun styles and challenges, including tube or spiral shapes, turned heels, afterthought heels, and toe-up. A helpful introduction gives readers a leg up on terminology, sizing, and fiber choices.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knitting reimagined : an innovative approach to structure and shape with 25 breathtaking projects / Nicky Epstein. “Rethink traditional knitting with this groundbreaking collection of 25 sophisticated patterns for beautiful sweaters, jackets, and accessories from one of the most influential voices in knitwear design. Award-winning author Nicky Epstein offers knitters of all skill levels adventurous, wearable projects that showcase innovative and clever construction and garment details. From a tunic created by weaving sections of knitting to a pullover featuring braided sleeve details, these patterns all offer interesting new twists on classic handknit designs. The stitches are easy, but the eye-opening results will challenge the way knitters think about this age-old craft. Each chapter focuses on one type of treatment, including innovative shaping, weaving, and braiding, directional knitting, or cutting-edge ways to use edgings and colorwork. Distilling her more than 30 years of knit design know-how, Nicky shares all the tricks of her trade in this gorgeous volume.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knit in new directions / with Myra Wood ; photography by Alexis Xenakis. “Freeing knitters with all levels of experience to become involved in the creative process and still make a garment that is knit-to-fit, this template-based approach is not math-dependent and works for people whether they prefer a structured or more freeform process. Knit in New Directions introduces techniques that encourage knitters to just have fun: strip knitting, creative short rows, patchwork, crazy quilt, and free-form knitting. It then explains the other essential tool—full-scale templates. Knitters learn to use the templates in the book and how to make one to their own measurements. Garment designs support each technique and template with two options. The Guided Tour provides full instructions for specific sizes as well as measure-as-you go versions. In the Alternative Routes, the template functions like a coloring book that allows the knitter to create completely new designs. Practical advice for how to achieve the best fit and finish is included with each design: blocking, a special stitch for seaming, and edge and embellishment options.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Pretty funny tea cosies : & other beautiful knitted things / Loani Prior. “Loani Prior, tea cosy knitter extraordinaire, is back with more of her fabulously outrageous creations. Pretty Funny Tea Cosies contains 25 knitted cosies and pretty things, with the focus on the pretty: flowers, leaves, fruit, loopy stitches and beautifully knitted and woven fabric…Including basic stitches, techniques and patterns, Pretty Funny Tea Cosies is a must-have for knitters and crafters and anyone who has ever wanted to have a Tibetan Tea Warrior tea cosy.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knitting smitten : 20 fresh and funky hand-knit designs / Jessica Biscoe ; photography by Keiko Oikawa. “Knitting Smitten encapsulates the joy of knitting with 20 fresh and funky hand-knit designs by knitting newcomer Jessica Biscoe. This latest book in the popular ‘Simple Makes’ series includes covetable accessories, such as a delicate Maiden Braid Bracelet and chunky Moss Stitch Cowl, perfect presents, such as the dinky Coin Purse and loopy stitch Hedgehog Paperweight, and must-have homewares, such as the Flamingo Cushion and Pennant Patch Throw.” (Publisher’s description)

    • WSSRU / CSW Secondary Schools tie resolution
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • RULES FOR TIED QUARTER-FINALS, SEMI-FINALS AND FINALS. DRAWN QUARTERS, SEMI FINALS & FINALS In all WSSRU quarter final, semi-final and final matches, if the scores are tied at the end of normal time, there is no extra time (IRB under more »

    • WRFU Club Rugby Tie resolution
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • WRFU Club Rugby WRFU By-law 6.2 SEMI-FINAL If at full-time in a SEMI-FINAL two teams are tied, then two ten minute spells will be played to determine the winner. There will be no “golden point”. If the scores are still tied more »

    • With PITA & THE WOLF screaming into a sellout, lets take a...
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Orchestra Wellington
      • With PITA & THE WOLF screaming into a sellout, lets take a closer look at our following concert SONG OF THE NIGHTINGALE and specifically its special guest Pianist Lecturer Dr Jian Liu. Chinese-American pianist Jian Liu, Lecturer in Piano at Te Kōkī, New Zealand School of Music, is a highly sought-after solo pianist, chamber musician, and educator. He has appeared on concert stages in China, Japan, Singapore, Portugal, Switzerland, Ukraine, the United States and New Zealand, and with symphony orchestras in Europe and USA.   Jian Liu’s performances have been broadcasted by various TV and radio stations including KPHO (CBS) in Phoenix, Arizona, CCTV in China, Suisse Romande Radio in Switzerland, and Radio NZ Concert in New Zealand. Phoenix New Times praised his playing as “if his life, and yours, depends upon his perfect execution”. Marlborough Express commended that “he challenged the audience to let their emotions ride with the sounds.” In 2012, Jian Liu was a guest artist for the New Zealand International Piano Festival in Auckland and undertook a 10-concert national concert tour for Chamber Music New Zealand. In 2013, he has performed the complete Debussy Etudes in both Wellington and Auckland. At age 12, Jian Liu was accepted at the prestigious Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. He moved to the United States when he was 15, and promptly won first place at the 6th Missouri Southern International Competition in 1996. Since then, Jian Liu has been honoured at various state, national, and international competitions, including the Phoenix Symphony Guilds Competition (USA) 1997, 3rd Horowitz International Piano Competition (Kiev, Ukraine) 1999, and MTNA Chamber Music Competition (USA) 2002. He has performed in many prestigious concert halls including Carnegie Hall, Steinway Hall in New York, Rose Hall of Lincoln Center, Sprague Hall and Woolsey Hall of Yale University, Paul Hall of Juilliard School, and Recital Hall of Sydney Conservatorium.  As a chamber musician, Jian Liu has featured alongside other world-class musicians such as cellist Jian Wang, clarinetist David Shifrin, flutist Ransom Wilson, Boston Symphony Orchestra cellist Alexandre Lecarme, and Yale Department of Music violinist Sarita Kwok. In 2011, represented by Chamber Music New Zealand, he toured with violinist Martin Riseley and flutist Alexa Still in major centres in New Zealand. Together with violinist Martin Riseley and cellist Inbal Megiddo, Jian Liu formed the Te Kōkī Trio. Recently, the trio has performed concerts in New Zealand, Singapore and Sydney, Australia. As an educator, Jian Liu was appointed the honorary professorship at the Qingdao University in 2012, and has given masterclasses and lectures at the Central Conservatory of Music in China, School of the Arts in Singapore, Sydney Conservatorium in Australia, as well as at Wellesley College, East Carolina University, and Yale University in the United States. From 2008 to 2010, he served as the faculty collaborative pianist at the Yale School of Music, and appointed as an instructor at Yale Department of Music. He earned his Bachelor of Music in Piano and Bachelor of Science in Business from Arizona State University, as well as Master of Music, Master of Musical Arts and Doctor of Musical Arts from Yale School of Music, under the tutelage of Claude Frank.  Tickets for SONG OF THE NIGHTINGALE are available from HERE

    • Term 3 2014 Parent Teacher Interviews
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • Parent teacher interviews will be held Monday 11 and Wednesday 13 August for years 1 to 13. Online booking will be available from Monday 4 to Sunday 10 August. read more

    • Kerry’s Fiction Picks
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Hi everyone, just a recap for those who don’t know who or what my picks are. I’m the fiction selector for Wellington City Libraries.  I spend a lot of time reading about and choosing lovely new fiction for you to enjoy.  I try to pick my favourites every week to share with you.  These books aren’t ’shelf ready’, but they are due to be published in the next six months or so.  And they are on the catalogue, available to reserve. With a friend like you Author Fanny Blake used to be an editor and a journalist so she obviously knows about what people enjoy reading.  With a friend like you is about the breakdown of a female friendship (the title gives it away doesn’t it?!)  Which is something I think we’ve all experienced at some time and that’s what made it so appealing.  The book is about two friends, Beth and Megan living in London, who are both very different, but get along wonderfully and have done for years.  Then Beth’s daughter reveals a secret which drives a wedge between the two friends.  From a happy, genuine friendship they turn to misunderstanding, arguments and then bitterness and all out war. It’s written with a lot of humor and caring (combined with Blake’s experience in the industry) and this is what sets it apart from your usual chick lit.  Blake’s previous book What women want was a quiet success too. Home place This story is both a murder mystery and a family saga.  It’s about a woman named Alma who must return home to Billings, in rural Montana, after her sister is found dead.  Alma had left behind her family years ago to live in Seattle and become a lawyer.  She had survived a car accident which killed both of her parents and the choice to flee was the easiest for her.  However, Vicky, her partying and troubled sister remained and one night drunk, she leaves a party and is found dead the next day.  Alma returns to care for her orphaned niece and soon becomes embroiled in the town’s dramas, its secrets and uncovers the possibility that her sister was murdered.  Library Journal says La Seur’s book is a “Walloping in suspense, drama, rage, and remorse, this debut is an accomplished literary novel of the new West.” Away from you This is by Kay Langdale, who’s published many a successful relationship/family lit-type novel.  Away from you focuses on mothers and it’s about Monica, who is offered a three month placement in LA for her work.  She knows she must do the best thing for her career and take the job, but it means leaving behind her children in London.  Monica hires Ursula as a housekeeper and reluctant nanny to take care of her family.  But Ursula doesn’t seem quite right and it becomes apparent there’s a dark secret in her past that keeps her cold and reserved.  Publisher Hodder and Stoughton are calling Langdale the next Jodi Piccoult – a big call!  The story does sound promising though.

    • Michael Lewis, Timothy Geithner & Arundhati Roy – popular new non fiction on our shelves!
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Here’s a quick round-up of some of our picks of the latest non-fiction in July. There are definitely some fairly weighty economics books this month, with Michael Lewis’s latest “Flash Boys” and a new book from Timothy Geithner, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. Arundhati Roy also has a new title out — enjoy! Flash boys : a Wall Street revolt / Michael Lewis. “In his latest captivating expedition into the marketplace jungle, Lewis (Moneyball) explores how the rise of computerized stock exchanges and their attendant scams started a battle for the soul of Wall Street. He probes the subterfuges of high frequency traders who, assisted by banks and brokerages happy to sell out customers, use blindingly fast data links to gain inside information on investors’ trades and then exploit them on today’s entirely digital stock markets. At the center of his novelistic narrative is a New York mosaic:… This cast bands together to expose the market manipulations and then start their own honest stock exchange.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Please, nurse! / Joan Lock. “When Joan Lock began her formal training as a young nurse in the 1950s, she was unprepared for the strict discipline and long hours which were to follow, and quickly realised she was no Florence Nightingale. Her honest and humorous account of the next three years reveals her most intimate experiences of being a nurse: from dealing with temperamental surgeons to fighting off flirtatious patients. Labelled a trouble-maker, Joan and her friends tested their strict Sisters’ patience as they climbed through windows, slept through lectures and broke every thermometer that passed through their hands. But through it all, Joan found herself touched by the people she met and their heart-warming stories.” (Syndetics summary) The good spy : the life and death of Robert Ames / Kai Bird. “Pulitzer Prize-winning author Bird… presents CIA intelligence officer Robert Ames (1934-83) as a serious intellectual, a devoted family man, and a hardworking, idealistic professional. After preparing readers for Ames’s death in the massive 1983 bombing of the American embassy in Beirut, Bird takes us back through Ames’s development as an expert in Arabic languages, history, and politics who increasingly focused on the Arab-Israeli conflict. By 1980, he was a recognized policy advisor within the CIA, state department, and White House. Bird interweaves his subject’s commitment to finding a solution to the Palestine dilemma with tracking the mounting unrest in Lebanon and increasing terrorism by Palestinians, Israelis, and militant Shiites. Readers are drawn to Ames and his effort to be a “good spy,” building solutions, even as the U.S. government, buffeted by partisan pressures, adhered to no one constructive policy…” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Things a little bird told me : confessions of the creative mind / Biz Stone. “Twitter cofounder Stone dropped out of college to design book jackets, just one of the quirky turns of fate that set him on a nonlinear path to social-media entrepreneurship. He recounts having enough chutzpah to call himself a genius when he suffered lack of confidence and direction, enough audacity to ask for a job at Google on the strength of his experience as a blogger when he lacked a college degree, never mind a PhD in computer science. He and Evan Williams, who joined Google after selling Blogger, later left the relative safety of Google to start several ventures, most of which failed, before developing Twitter. While chronicling his setbacks and successes, Stone offers solid advice and inspiration: opportunity can be manufactured, creativity is a renewable resource, embrace constraints, failures can be assets, asking questions is free, empathy is essential to success.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Capitalism : a ghost story / Arundhati Roy. “…Roy’s… book begins with Karl Marx’s quip that capitalism is like a sorcerer’s apprentice, conjuring forces too strong for it to control. She labels these apprentices as America’s multinational corporations and the various organizations that act as tentacles, disrupting the cultures, economies, and governments of the world. Prominent in the list are endowed foundations like those started by Ford and Rockefeller, which transformed the fortunes of the US’s most successful magnates into political influence by funding the beginnings of the U.N., the CIA, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Research and Development (RAND) Corporation. Roy traces the links between these groups and the co-optation of social science research, using NGOs to soften the politics of radical social movements in the face of IMF-imposed structural adjustment, and the separation of feminist and class analysis in mainstream political discussions. Roy’s central concern is the effect on her own country, and she shows how Indian politics have taken on the same model, leading to the ghosts of her book’s title: 250,000 farmers have committed suicide, 800 million impoverished and dispossessed Indians, environmental destruction, colonial-like rule in Kashmir, and brutal treatment of activists and journalists. In this dark tale, Roy gives rays of hope that illuminate cracks in the nightmare she evokes.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Everyday sexism / Laura Bates. “After experiencing a series of escalating sexist incidents, Laura Bates, a young journalist, started a project called ‘everyday sexism’ to raise the profile of these previously untold stories. Astounded by the response she received and the wide range of stories that came pouring in from all over the world, she quickly realised that the situation was far worse than she’d initially thought. Enough was enough. From being harrassed and wolf-whistled at on the street, to discrimination in the workplace and serious sexual assault, it was clear that sexism had become normalised. Bates decided it was time for women to lead a real change. Bold, jaunty but always intelligent, ‘everyday sexism’ is a protest against inequality that provides a unique window into the vibrant movement sparked by this juggernaut of stories – often shocking, sometimes amusing and always poignant. Welcome to the fourth wave of feminism.” (Syndetics summary) Stress test : reflections on financial crises / Timothy F. Geithner. “On January 26, 2009, during the depth of the financial crisis and having just completed five years as President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Timothy F. Geithner was sworn in by President Barack Obama as the seventy-fifth Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. Now, in a strikingly candid, riveting, and historically illuminating memoir, Geithner takes readers behind the scenes during the darkest moments of the crisis. Swift, decisive, and creative action was required to avert a second Great Depression, but policy makers faced a fog of uncertainty, with no good options and the risk of catastrophic outcomes. Stress Test Reflections on Financial Crises takes us inside the room, explaining in accessible and forthright terms the hard choices and politically unpalatable decisions that Geithner and others in the Obama administration made during the crisis and recovery.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Angel investing : the Gust guide to making money and having fun investing in startups / David S. Rose. “This how-to guide is aimed at readers interested in learning more about the relatively new field of angel investing, which involves investing in a variety of private, start-up companies with high-growth potential. Entrepreneur Rose has been an angel investor for about 15 years and founded the New York Angels group and gust.com, a platform for connecting entrepreneurs and investors. His investing background proves an asset, as he takes a multidisciplinary approach. -Angel basics-such as financial skills and what to look for in a start-up company-are included, as well as more peripheral topics like funding platforms and how to become better known in the field…” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Occupy World Street : a global roadmap for radical economic and political reform / Ross Jackson ; foreword by Hazel Henderson. “Jackson, chairman of the Danish-based foundation Gaia Trust and co-editor of Gaian Economics: Living Well Within Planetary Limits, provides a comprehensive and lucidly written history of neoliberal economics and its effects, tracing the inequalities inherent in neoliberal economic planning. Neoliberalism, as Jackson illustrates, isn’t an inevitable historical development, but rather an “artificial construct” created by people with a self-serving strategy that neglects the rest of humanity. Jackson presents the fundamental flaws in modern economics, locates the turning point in regulation and economic behavior, and then shows how and why things have devolved to their current state through the actions of the IMF and WTO. He traces a new, emergent worldview, proposing a solution in the form of a Gaian economic system, in which smaller, decentralized, diverse communities with a degree of local democracy form the proposed utopia, in contrast to the branded neoliberal free market of corporate dreams. A return to a simpler, more satisfying, and sustainable lifestyle is both necessary and inevitable, Jackson argues. (adapted from Syndetics summary) Sustainable revolution : permaculture in ecovillages, urban farms, and communities worldwide / Juliana Birnbaum & Louis Fox. “Urban gardeners. Seed-saving collectives. Intentional communities. Renewable energy innovators and proponents of gift economies. How are these seemingly disparate groups connected? Based on common ethics of sustainable cultures throughout history, the ecological design systems of permaculture is the common thread that weaves them into a powerful, potentially revolutionary – or evolutionary – movement. Sustainable Revolution features photographs, interviews, and essays profiling 60 thriving community-based projects in diverse climates across the planet…(adapted from Syndetics summary) Poison spring : the secret history of pollution and the EPA / E.G. Vallianatos with McKay Jenkins. “Vallianatos, after a 25-year stint at the Environmental Protection Agency, pulls back the curtain on the watchdog agency’s failure to guard public safety and monitor land use due to steady erosion of its enforcement practices. With environmental journalist Jenkins he blasts the EPA’s ineptitude since its 1970 inception, intensely pressured as it is by politicians and corporations to approve the use of synthetic chemicals without proper testing-”biologic death bombs” in the air, water, and in our bodies. The EPA, through its Congressional mandate, enforces more than a dozen environmental laws, yet it has approved hundreds of pesticides that have been used unnecessarily, excessively, or which have been outright abused, the book contends. Vallianatos does give the agency credit for the hard-fought ban on DDT that was opposed by the chemical companies and pesticide apologists. He also explores the causes of the dwindling honeybee population and the loss of the traditional family farms to the aggressive corporate giants, as well as the repression of EPA whistleblowers squashed by a code of silence and lack of access to information. (adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Haere rā OurSpace
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • On Sunday we’ll be saying goodbye to our multimedia exhibition OurSpace to make room for the next exciting step towards Te Papa’s flagship exhibition commemorating 100 years since WWI. We are incredibly grateful to everyone who has contributed images and videos to OurSpace, which opened in 2008. More than 10,000 images and videos were provided so they could be... Read more »

    • Arohatia te Reo: learning 50 kupu hou (new Māori words) – Te Reo and WWI research
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • In honour of Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori, here are a number of kupu Māori (Māori words) that I constantly use in my everyday mahi/work as a curator at Te Papa, and especially in my research for the First World War exhibition we are presently developing. Many of the sources written in te reo Māori that date... Read more »

    • The art of creating – new craft books in July
      • 24 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Ikebana, the old Japanese art of arranging flowers, has remained popular for hundred of years and is loved by many for its natural beauty, simplicity and spirituality. I’ve cherished the Ikebana demonstrations offered by my aunt Mary to her students and often, to charitable organisations for women. My aunt had an amazing talent putting together stunning flower arrangements and at the same time explaining the history and philosophy of the Ikebana art. All her special arrangements were created with plants and flowers from her delightful home garden and she was very proud of Ikebana. Find out more about this unique Japanese art in the book ‘Japanese Ikebana for every season’, featured in this collection of our latest library arrivals, and enjoy these picks of our new craft books! Japanese ikebana for every season / Rie Imai and Yuji Ueno ; photography by Noboru Murata. ” The true meaning of Ikebana–the traditional Japanese art of flower arrangement–is the ability to take a few beautiful flowers and plans and tastefully present them in very simple containers to decorate your home. Whether for Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day, or a special birthday or anniversary–”Japanese Ikebana for Every Season” simplifies and demystifies this ancient art by presenting 53 elegantly simple arrangements that anyone can create at anytime at home. No matter what time of year it is and regardless of your taste or budget–the arrangements in this book will lend a touch of Japanese elegance to your home.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Floral knits : 25 contemporary flower-inspired designs / Martin Storey ; photographs by Steven Wooster. “Flower power fuels this collection of 25 knitted accessories, sweaters, and home decor wares. Knitwear designer Storey (Aran Knits) focuses on creating flowers with texture and color, whether sewn on or knitted into the pattern. The Fleur cardigan and the Tulip beret and fingerless gloves use color work to create lovely garden rows around the hems and cuffs of each project. The monochromatic Herbaceous pillow and throw turn to texture to create items for the home out of assembled knit squares. The Bloom bag and brooch make use of funky over-sized knit flowers. The cabled Blossom sweater, socks, and fingerless gloves are finished with delicate flower embroidery. The first half of the book presents the projects and the second half details the patterns. Knitters looking for exotic varietals or abstract renditions of our flowered friends should look elsewhere; this collection focuses on pictorial representations of the more familiar, much-loved domestic garden residents. ” (Publisher Weekly) Happy feet : unique knits to knock your socks off / Cathy Carron. “Popular knitwear designer Cathy Carron has gone from head (her bestselling “Hattitude”) to toe, with this unique collection of socks, stockings, legwarmers, slippers, sandal socks, and more. Perfect for advanced beginner to advanced knitters, the more than 40 fashion-forward designs offer a variety of fun styles and challenges, including tube or spiral shapes, turned heels, afterthought heels, and toe-up. A helpful introduction gives readers a leg up on terminology, sizing, and fiber choices.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knitting reimagined : an innovative approach to structure and shape with 25 breathtaking projects / Nicky Epstein. “Rethink traditional knitting with this groundbreaking collection of 25 sophisticated patterns for beautiful sweaters, jackets, and accessories from one of the most influential voices in knitwear design. Award-winning author Nicky Epstein offers knitters of all skill levels adventurous, wearable projects that showcase innovative and clever construction and garment details. From a tunic created by weaving sections of knitting to a pullover featuring braided sleeve details, these patterns all offer interesting new twists on classic handknit designs. The stitches are easy, but the eye-opening results will challenge the way knitters think about this age-old craft. Each chapter focuses on one type of treatment, including innovative shaping, weaving, and braiding, directional knitting, or cutting-edge ways to use edgings and colorwork. Distilling her more than 30 years of knit design know-how, Nicky shares all the tricks of her trade in this gorgeous volume.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knit in new directions / with Myra Wood ; photography by Alexis Xenakis. “Freeing knitters with all levels of experience to become involved in the creative process and still make a garment that is knit-to-fit, this template-based approach is not math-dependent and works for people whether they prefer a structured or more freeform process. Knit in New Directions introduces techniques that encourage knitters to just have fun: strip knitting, creative short rows, patchwork, crazy quilt, and free-form knitting. It then explains the other essential tool—full-scale templates. Knitters learn to use the templates in the book and how to make one to their own measurements. Garment designs support each technique and template with two options. The Guided Tour provides full instructions for specific sizes as well as measure-as-you go versions. In the Alternative Routes, the template functions like a coloring book that allows the knitter to create completely new designs. Practical advice for how to achieve the best fit and finish is included with each design: blocking, a special stitch for seaming, and edge and embellishment options.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Pretty funny tea cosies : & other beautiful knitted things / Loani Prior. “Loani Prior, tea cosy knitter extraordinaire, is back with more of her fabulously outrageous creations. Pretty Funny Tea Cosies contains 25 knitted cosies and pretty things, with the focus on the pretty: flowers, leaves, fruit, loopy stitches and beautifully knitted and woven fabric…Including basic stitches, techniques and patterns, Pretty Funny Tea Cosies is a must-have for knitters and crafters and anyone who has ever wanted to have a Tibetan Tea Warrior tea cosy.” (Adapted from Syndetics) Knitting smitten : 20 fresh and funky hand-knit designs / Jessica Biscoe ; photography by Keiko Oikawa. “Knitting Smitten encapsulates the joy of knitting with 20 fresh and funky hand-knit designs by knitting newcomer Jessica Biscoe. This latest book in the popular ‘Simple Makes’ series includes covetable accessories, such as a delicate Maiden Braid Bracelet and chunky Moss Stitch Cowl, perfect presents, such as the dinky Coin Purse and loopy stitch Hedgehog Paperweight, and must-have homewares, such as the Flamingo Cushion and Pennant Patch Throw.” (Publisher’s description)

    • New books – festivals and ceremonies
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Celebrations and festivals mark our progress through each year, and are special times to enjoy with family, or opportunities to indulge our interests and celebrate life. This selection of new books on festivals and ceremonies is full of vibrant colour and joyful celebrations of culture. We hope you enjoy them! Around the world in 500 festivals : the world’s most spectacular celebrations / Steve Daley. “Around the World in 500 Festivals is a rare book that will fascinate and inspire. A large-format, beautifully illustrated coffee-table volume, it is a photographic exploration of the richness and variety of the worlds most colourful, moving, joyful, and spectacular celebrations. Thousands of festivals, great and small, take place around the world every year. ” (Abridged from Syndetics Summary) Pasefika : the Festival of Pacific Arts / Floyd K. Takeuchi. “Every four years since 1972, the Pacific Islands’ best dancers and cultural practitioners gather to perform. The Festival of Pacific Arts, as this amazing event is known, is a celebration unlike any other held in Oceania. The Festival is a two-week showcase of the finest dancers, singers, carvers and other cultural masters from across the Pacific. This book, the first published about the Festival of Pacific Arts, tells the story of the 10th Festival that was held in American Samoa in mid-2008. More than 2,000 cultural practitioners traveled to Tutuila Island for the 10th Festival of Pacific Arts. Hundreds of visitors from around the world, plus thousands of resident Samoans, gathered on the shores of Pago Pago Harbor to watch performance after performance. This book is the story of that special gathering of the best of the Pacific Islands.” (Fishpond.co.nz) A perfect haze : the illustrated history of the Monterey International Pop Festival / Harvey Kubernik and Kenneth Kubernik ; foreword by Lou Adler ; afterword by Michelle Phillips. “The sights and sounds of one of the most famous music festivals in history come to life in this extraordinary compilation of photography, memorabilia, and firsthand accounts from the Summer of Love’s biggest event.” (Syndetics summary) Rick Steves’ European Christmas / by Rick Steves and Valerie Griffith. “Rick Steves, America’s expert on Europe, teams up with co-author Valerie Griffith to explore the rich and fascinating mix of traditions-Christian, pagan, musical, and edible-that led to the Christmas festivities we enjoy today.Rick brings home an authentic, surprising portrait of holiday celebrations in England, Norway, France, Germany, Austria, Italy, and Switzerland. Romans cook up eels, Salzburgers shoot off guns, Germans buy “prune people” at markets, Norwegian kids hope to win marzipan pigs, and Parisians ice-skate on the Eiffel Tower.With thoughtful insights, vibrant photos, and more than a dozen recipes, this book captures the spirit of the season. It’s a delightful way to learn something new-and old-about Christmas.” (Syndetics summary) Let’s celebrate! : festival poems from around the world / edited by Debjani Chatterjee & Brian D’Arcy ; illustrated by Shirin Adl.Let’s Celebrate!: Festival Poems from Around the World “Twenty-four festivals are presented through poetry in different forms, some of which may be new to readers. The celebrations presented are a mix of religious and secular, and each one is briefly explained in the back matter. The selections range from classics by Ralph Waldo Emerson and Pablo Neruda to entries by “Anonymous” and the editors of the book. Colorful, mixed-media illustrations” (Abridged from School Library Journal) Lighting our world : a year of celebrations / written by Catherine Rondina ; illustrated by Jacqui Oakley. “From the children’s festival of Tet Trung Thu in Vietnam to the holy month of Ramadan, Rondina and Oakley offer an informative, month-by-month look at global holidays, both religious and secular. A February/March spread highlights Las Fallas, a festival honoring Saint Joseph in Valencia, Spain, as well as the Lenten Carnival in Martinique; a July spread covers independence celebrations in six countries, including Argentina, Belgium, and France. Oakley’s acrylic paintings have a weathered quality that recalls faded murals, while conjuring appropriately festive atmospheres for each occasion. Ages 7-10.” (Publisher Weekly)

    • Public talk to explore climate change and psychology
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • An Antarctic research expert and a social psychologist from Victoria University of Wellington will be giving a free public lecture on climate change in Nelson as part of the University’s 2014 Public Lecture Series.

    • Scots College Basketball Club wine fundraiser
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • As part of our fundraising for the Basketball Club you are invited to buy and/or sell cartons or bottles of top quality wine from Pegasus Bay Fine Waipara Wine in Waipara Valley.  Pegasus Bay is a family owned and operated winery, vineyard and restaurant producing estate grown Pegasus Bay wine range and their second label Main Divide, as per the attached order form (222KB). read more

    • “Other Genre” novels for July, this month featuring translated fiction
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • New translated fiction features this month in our “Other Genre” category. From Korea, to Syria, Latin America to Germany, Albania to France, this selection has diverse range of characters, setting and themes. Highly recommended is The People in the Photo by Helene Gestern, winner of more than fifteen awards in France. Sworn virgin / Elvira Dones ; translated by Clarissa Botsford ; foreword by Ismail Kadare. “Aspiring writer Hana Doda, newly arrived in Washington, D.C., from her native Albania, suffers sensory overload. Before coming to America, Hana returned to her mountain home, from her university in the capital city of Tirana, to take care of her Uncle Gjergj, who was dying of cancer. Gjergj presses Hana to find a husband so that she will be provided for after he’s gone. But Hana is not inclined to be tied down. Her rejection of marriage triggers a bizarre but time-honored Albanian custom: she promises, in exchange for her independence, to live a celibate life as a man, using the name “Mark.”(Adapted from Syndetics summary) The people in the photo / Hélène Gestern ; translated from the French by Emily Boyce and Ros Schwartz. ” This remarkable debut novel begins with a photo of Parisian archivist Helene’s mother, Natasha, taken in 1971, a year before Natasha died. It includes two men Helene has never seen before. She advertises for anyone knowing the identity of either of the men in the photo, and she connects with Stephane, whose father is one of the men. The story develops that Helene was only four when her mother died, and her father and stepmother will tell her nothing about Natasha, not even how she died. Stephane’s father became seriously depressed, and his parents’ marriage became very bitter after 1971, so he has something at stake in this also. While the mystery surrounding Natasha unfolds, so does the deepening relationship between Helene and Stephane.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The hen who dreamed she could fly : a novel / Sun-mi Hwang ; translated by Chi-Young Kim ; illustrated by Nomoco. “This novella, translated from Korean, explores ideals of compassion, individuality, sacrifice, and motherhood all through a crew of barnyard animals. Confined to laying eggs in the chicken coop, scraggly hen Sprout has but a single dream: to hatch her own chick. When she’s culled from the coop, Sprout narrowly escapes a weasel’s clutches, thanks to Straggler, the misfit mallard duck. Soon Sprout discovers an abandoned egg in a briar patch, and contentedly settles on top of it, her dreams finally realized. Straggler brings fish to the nest and keeps the roaming weasel at bay. The fable sold more than two million copies in Korea.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) In praise of hatred / Khaled Khalifa ; translated from the Arabic by Leri Price. “Set in Syria in the late 1970s and early 1980s when a rebellion against the current leader’s father was brutally suppressed. The unnamed narrator of this novel is a young girl growing up in a house of women in Aleppo, Syria. In school she becomes involved with a prayer group of devout women who have been influenced by the Muslim Brotherhood. As the novel progresses, the girl’s religious devotion turns into zealotry, and rejection of the middle ground, particularly as the secular regime in power cracks down on Islamists in a bloody fashion. Although it was banned in Syria, this novel was named a finalist for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Summer house with swimming pool : a novel / Herman Koch ; translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett. “Dr. Marc Schlosser, whose practice includes a new patient, veteran TV and stage actor Ralph Meier. At a party, Marc doesn’t like the way Ralph looks at his wife, Caroline. So when Marc and his family are invited to spend part of their vacation at Ralph’s summer house (with swimming pool), Marc reluctantly accepts. There, his family mingles with Ralph’s family, as well as houseguests Stanley Forbes, a film director, and his much younger girlfriend. The air is rife with sexual tension as Ralph showers too much attention on Marc’s underage daughter, Julia, and Marc toys with having an affair with Ralph’s wife, Judith. Then tragedy strikes. One year later, through a confluence of events, Ralph is dead and Marc is implicated. Over the course of the novel, the truth about what really happened that summer is revealed.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Song of the spirits / Sarah Lark ; translated by D. W. Lovett. “Elaine O’Keefe is the radiant grand-daughter of Gwyneira McKenzie, who made her way to New Zealand to take a wealthy sheep baron’s hand in marriage. Elaine inherited not only her grandmother’s red hair but also her feisty spirit, big heart, and love of the land. When William Martyn, a handsome young Irishman of questionable integrity, walks into her life, she succumbs rapidly to his charms, only to have her heart broken when her sensual half-Maori cousin Kura Warden arrives for a visit and draws William away. Though both young women must endure hardships and disappointments as they learn to live with the choices they make, each of them also discovers an inner resilience and eventually finds love and happiness in new, unexpected places.”(Adapted from Syndetics summary) Diary of the fall / Michel Laub ; translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa. “A schoolboy prank goes horribly wrong, and a thirteen-year-old boy is left injured. Years later, one of the classmates relives the episode as he tries to come to terms with his demons. Diary of the Fall is the story of three generations: a man examining the mistakes of his past, and his struggle for forgiveness; a father with Alzheimer’s, for whom recording every memory has become an obsession; and a grandfather who survived Auschwitz, filling notebook after notebook with the false memories of someone desperate to forget.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Talking to ourselves / Andrâes Neuman ; translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia. “Lito is ten years old and is almost sure he can change the weather when he concentrates very hard. His father, Mario, anxious to create a memory that will last for his son’s lifetime, takes him on a road trip in a truck called Pedro. But Lito doesn’t know that this might be their last trip: Mario is seriously ill. Together, father and son embark on travels that take them through strange geographies, ones that seem to unite the borders of Spanish-speaking world. In the meantime, Lito’s mother Elena looks for support in books, undertaking an adventure of her own that will challenge her moral limits. The narratives of father, mother, and son each embody one of the different ways that we talk to ourselves: through thought, speech, and writing. While neither of them dares to tell the complete truth to the other two, their solitary voices nonetheless form a poignant conversation. “(Adapted from Syndetics summary) The antiquarian / Gustavo Faverón Patriau ; translated from the Spanish by Joseph Mulligan. “The debut novel from Patriau, a Peruvian journalist, critic, and Roberto Bolano scholar. Psycholinguist Gustavo is contacted by his old friend Daniel, whom he hasn’t heard from in years. Daniel asks Gustavo to visit him in a nearby mental institution, where he’s being held for murdering his fiancée. Daniel, a mild-mannered eccentric who loves antique books, promises to reveal why he did what he did, and thus draws Gustavo into a search through the underground and back alleys of his unnamed South American country. Along the way, Gustavo encounters a rare book dealer network that’s actually a front for traffickers in illegally obtained human organs.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Decompression : a novel / Juli Zeh ; translated from the German by John Cullen. “Jola is a beautiful and privileged soap star who wants very much to be taken seriously; her partner Theo is a middle-aged author with writers’ block. In an attempt to further her career, Jola is determined to land the lead role in a new film about underwater photographer and model Lotte Hass.To improve her chances, the couple travel to Lanzarote and hire diving instructor Sven, paying him a large sum for exclusive tuition. Sven is meticulously planning his most ambitious expedition yet, to an untouched wreck 100 metres down on the ocean floor. Diving calls for a cool head and, as a sinister love triangle develops, events rapidly get out of hand.” (Adapted from amazon.co.uk)

    • Surveillance a part of everyday life
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Details of casual conversations and a comprehensive store of ‘deleted’ information were just some of what Victoria University of Wellington students found during a project to uncover what records companies keep. 

    • New Science Fiction and Fantasy novels for July
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Androids, outer space exploration, time travel, genetic engineering and magic, just some of the themes in this month’s selection of new Science Fiction and Fantasy novels. Also included also is the new Ben Nova novel titled, Transhuman. Skin game : a novel of the Dresden files / Jim Butcher. “Harry Dresden, having finally succumbed to Mab and become the Winter Knight, is hiding out. The spirit of the island can help keep his debilitating headaches at bay, and keep Mab off his back. She shows up with a job for him to help Nicodemus Archleone steal the Holy Grail from Hades. Harry, having a good sense for survival, is quite sure Nicodemus is going to do his best to prevent anyone from surviving the experience and that Mab has motives she’s not mentioning.” (Adapted ffrom Syndetics summary) Transhuman / Ben Bova. “Iconoclastic cellular biologist Luke Abramson is determined to save his dying eight-year-old granddaughter, Angela, with his cutting-edge treatment for cancer. Inconveniently, his process is not yet approved for use on humans, and he’s stymied by the objections of Angela’s parents. When Luke and Angela vanish, FBI special agent Jerry Hightower is assigned to recover them. While Luke’s allies are manipulating him to gain control of his revolutionary treatments and the profit they promise, his enemies will go to great lengths to keep the life-extension genie in its bottle. Luke has more immediate concerns: the side effects of the treatments that he has inflicted on himself and his helpless granddaughter are progressive and potentially lethal.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) 1636 : Commander Cantrell in the West Indies / Eric Flint and Charles E. Gannon. “Book 14 in the alternative history series, Ring of Fire. Eddie Cantrell, now married to the king of Denmark’s daughter, is sent by Admiral Simpson to the Caribbean to secure access to the most valuable commodity on that continent, not the gold and silver which the Spanish treasure, but the oil which up-time machines and industry need. The admiral has also provided Eddie’s small task force with the new steam-powered frigates that have just come out of the navy’s shipyards. Even with the frigates, a giant obstacle stands in his way: the Gulf-girdling Spanish presence in the New World.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Property of a lady faire : a secret histories novel / Simon R. Green. “Eddie Drood is on the outs with his notorious family again but this time might be for good. When he returns to the family manor for the reading of his grandmother’s will, he is offered a powerful artifact that would allow him to rule over the Droods, but only if he gives up the love of his life, the witch Molly Metcalfe. Eddie instead decides to go after the Lazarus Stone, an object once owned by his family that has the ability to control time. The stone is in the possession of the Lady Faire, however, which means this mission just got seriously dangerous.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) In dark service / Stephen Hunt. “Jacob Carnehan has settled down and is going out of his mind with boredom. He’s longing for an opportunity to escape, and test himself against whatever the world has to offer. Carter is going to get his opportunity. He’s caught up in a village fight, kidnapped by slavers and, before he knows it, is swept to another land. A lowly slave, surrounded by technology he doesn’t understand, his wish has come true: it’s him vs. the world.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Stone cold : a broken magic novel / Devon Monk. “Marked by Life and Death magic, Shame Flynn and Terric Conley are “breakers”, those who can use magic to its fullest extent. Most of the time, they can barely stand each other, but they know they have to work together to defeat a common enemy, rogue magic user Eli Collins. Backed by the government, Eli is trying to use magic as a weapon by carving spells into the flesh of innocents and turning them into brainless walking bombs. To stop him, Shame and Terric will need to call on their magic even as it threatens to consume them.” (Adapted from Book cover) The flight of the silvers / Daniel Price. “Marked from youth, six people are saved from the destruction of their world by the smugly superior Pelletiers, casually lethal superhumans from a distant future. Transported to a universe where history played out differently, the six “Silvers” are dumped into an isolationist but technologically advanced America. Each of them has some special power, such as super-speed or precognition; this makes them useful in the grand machinations of the Pelletiers, but marks them as targets for the government and an existential threat to the secretive Gothams. Then a seventh Silver appears: Evan Rander, a murderous stalker whose unique talent is his ability to rewind time.” (Adapted fromSyndetics Summary) Lockstep / Karl Schroeder. “When 17-year-old Toby awakens from an accidentally extended hibernation, he discovers, to his amazement, that 14,000 years have passed. Even more surprising is that his younger brother and sister, Peter and Evayne, are only 40 years older than they were when he went to sleep. How can this be? But there are more surprises in store: Toby has become one of the most famous persons in history, a deity regarded as the Emperor of Time, thanks to a cult his sister has formed around him. And his brother, who has become a tyrant over the 70,000 worlds of the Lockstep, wants to kill him.“ Adapted from Syndetics summary) Operation shield : a Cassandra Kresnov novel / Joel Shepherd. “Sandy is a GI, an artificial human built by the Federation to be a super-soldier. Retired from the military, she now works with the Federation Security Agency to free other GIs illegally built and manipulated by corporations. As Sandy uncovers foul political doings, schemers try to discredit her standing with the GIs she’s trying to help. Some villain is also targeting the three orphans Sandy rescued and is considering adopting” (Adapted from Syndetics summary). The echo / James Smythe. “Set primarily in the depths of space, the second novel in Smythe’s Anomaly Quartet (after The Explorer) picks up 23 years after the disappearance of spaceship Ishiguro as identical twins Mira and Tomas Hyvonen are put in charge of the latest expedition to outer space. As Mira leads a team to the anomaly, Tomas is left behind to run the mission from Earth, and subtle resentment beings to build between the brothers as a result of their various roles. Yet just when the spaceship reaches the anomaly, the mission begins to go off the rails. Mira must battle with his desire to learn about the anomaly, save his crew, and please those on Earth who funded the mission, all the while trying to get back alive.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary

    • New sports books this month
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • If the World Cup football or the Commonwealth Games has made you want to read more about these sporting events, our selection this month will keep you entertained – along with books on running, cricket and sailing. Brazil Futebol : football to the rhythm of the samba beat / Keir Radnedge. “‘Brazil Futebol’ captures the essence of the world’s premier football nation and tells the story of more than a century of footballing passion. Starting in the 1870s when the Scottish expatriate Thomas Donohue introduced the game to the native Brazillians, it recounts the unprecedented success of the national team, building to the debut World Cup win in 1958 and beyond, detailing the most famous moments and players.” (Books in Print) Shadows on the Road : life at the heart of the peloton, from US Postal to Team Sky / Michael Barry. “In 2012, veteran cyclist Michael Barry announced his retirement from the sport. Weeks later he testified against his former team mate Lance Armstrong, as part of the USADA investigation.In a stunning piece of writing, Barry explores the dreams and passion of a young, idealistic cycling fan from Toronto, what it was like to go on to ride as a teammate alongside such giants of the sport as Lance Armstrong, Mark Cavendish, Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome, and how those dreams were compromised early on in his career by a sport in crisis. But it is also the story of his eleven years riding clean, before and after his time in the notorious US Postal Team. What was it like to head for Europe at such a young age, and what was it like to escape the environment of doping, to try and start again, all the time aware that past actions may one day catch up with him? Offering an elegiac insight into the life and mind of a professional sportsman – the pressures, sacrifices, fears, crashes, injuries and neuroses – Shadows on the Road is a must-read for cycling and sports fans alike.” (Books in Print) The World Cup : heroes, hoodlums, high-kicks and head-butts / Paul Hansford. “Overview of the World Cup, the international competition played by the best soccer players in the world. The World Cup has a strong, irreverent and humourous writing voice. It concentrates on the stories behind the legends, teams and great matches of the World Cup, putting aside the pundits’ picks for who will win (they invariably get it wrong anyway) and concentrating on the weird, whacky, controversial and legendary moments of the world’s best sporting event. For example, it references the cult hero Ilunga Mwepu in the 74 finals against Brazil. Clearly unsure of the rules of association football, when the referee blows his whistle for Brazil to take a free kick, he pegs it out of the wall and blasts the ball up field. A yellow card and eternal infamy follow. There are hundreds of brilliant tales like this in the history of the game and they receive as much coverage as the heroes and greatest matches.” (Syndetics summary) Climbing Manual : the essential guide to rock climbing / Nigel Shepherd. “This climbing manual is a thoroughly modern introduction to rock climbing. From getting started with equipment, clothing, fitness, and basic skills through to advanced techniques and coping with tricky situations, this book is packed with practical step-by-step sequences and inspirational photography, making it the perfect guide for the novice or intermediate climber.” (Books in Print) The Commonwealth Games : extraordinary stories behind the medals / Brian Oliver. “Sports journalist Brian Oliver brings these often overlooked Games to life with fantastic stories of the athletes who have competed over the years. He delves into past games for the best tales, and interviews the key protagonists to unveil the highs and lows of this eccentric sporting competition.” (Syndetics summary) Cricket Manual : the official guide to playing the game / Andy Tennant ; foreword by Michael Vaughan. “From health and fitness through to training, bowling, batting, fielding, strategy, coaching and umpiring, every aspect of the game is analysed and explained in detail. Presented in an attractively designed and user-friendly style with numerous photographs and graphics, this manual is an essential reference book for the keen cricketer as well as an informative read for any sports fan.” (Books in Print) Cyclopedia : it’s all about the bike / written by William Fotheringham. “Fotheringham (Cycle Racing) offers a reference to bicycles and cycling culture. Organized alphabetically, entries include brief biographies, terms, competitions, bicycle models and makers, team song lyrics, and even time lines. Informative and frank biographical entries open with birth and death dates, major wins, nicknames, and (when applicable) books written. Framed sidebars present subject trivia, while maps detail a competition’s geographical course. A humorous yet substantial addition to sports or cycling history collections.” (Library Journal) The Big Book of the World Cup / by Clive Batty and John Murray. “Bursting with action-packed pictures, fascinating facts, stats, trivia and vital World Cup information, The Big Book of the World Cup is the perfect companion to the greatest sporting show on Earth. The book features an in-depth guide to each of the 32 competing nations, profiles of the star players who will be there plus a tour of South Africa looking at the colourful setting and the wonderful stadiums which will provide the backdrop for the 2010 tournament. Also features an interactive fixtures guide and scorechart, as well as a complete TV viewing guide.” (Books in Print) Trail Running : from start to finish / Graeme Hilditch. “The popularity of running has never been greater and with thousands of everyday people taking in conventional 5k, 10k, half-marathon and marathon road running events, there seems to be a natural desire to seek other arguably more challenging forms of running. Trail Running helps advise runners how to make the transition from road running to off road running, whether your intention is purely for fun or to take part in specialist off road events.” (Syndetics summary) The Complete Running & Marathon Book / senior editor, Catherine Saunders. “Includes tips that can help you to gain a vital competitive edge, from goal-setting and motivation to running psychology and race tactics. This book helps you assess and develop your technique under clear no-nonsense guidance with detailed visuals to help you understand what your body is going through.” (Syndetics summary) The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Sailing / by Diane Selkirk. “There’s something magical about casting off on your own sailboat to parts unknown. This guide gives you tons of tips for enjoying your time on the water.” (Syndetics summary) Feet in the Clouds : a tale of fell-running and obsession / Richard Askwith. “Feet in the Clouds is a chronicle of a masochistic but admirable sporting obsession and an insight into one of the oldest extreme sports”–Publisher’s description. 2014 Season Guide : the NRL’s official information handbook.

    • New Graphic Novels for July
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Three new series are among the selected new graphic novels this month. As always we have chosen a wide range of story lines and artistic styles that we hope you will enjoy. Highly recommended is Red Light Properties: previously-haunted real estate by Dan Goldman. Sherlock Holmes and the vampires of London / story by Sylvain Cordurié ; art by Laci. “Sherlock Holmes died fighting Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls. At least that’s what the press claims. However, Holmes is alive and well and taking advantage of his presumed death to travel the globe. Unfortunately, Holmes’s plans are thwarted when a plague of vampirism begins haunting Britain.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Celebrated summer / Charles Forsman. “With high school over, Mike and Wolf, two apathetic teens in an unnamed suburban sprawl, have all the time in the world to do what they want, which includes a day of dropping acid, hiking to the top of a mountain, and then driving to the beach. As the acid kicks in, action ensues. What could have been merely a day in the life of a couple of teenagers on drugs is ratcheted up by breakaways to Wolf telling stories from his life, which paint a sad, familiar portrait.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary Red Light Properties : previously-haunted real estate. 01 / written & realized by Dan Goldman. “Jude, certified phenomenologist, with Cecilia, licensed real estate broker, run the Miami-based paranormal exorcisms real estate business Red Light Properties and have come to an impasse rooted in misunderstanding and distrust; it could mean the end. Cecilia can’t connect to Jude and doesn’t understand his almost violent experiences with death and his viewpoint of the magic of life. With honesty built from their love and flaws, can Jude and Cecilia move forward, save their marriage and family, and develop their business to its fullest potential.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Black is the color / Julia Gfrörer. “Black is the Color begins with a 17th-century sailor abandoned at sea by his shipmates, and as it progresses he endures, and eventually succumbs to, both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. The narrative also explores the experiences of the loved ones he leaves behind, on his ship and at home on land, as well as of the mermaids who jadedly witness his destruction.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Mr Unpronounceable adventures / Tim Molloy. “Welcome to The City Of The Ever Open Eye, a dream world metropolis of surreal wonder and dark nightmare. Nestled between the scorched wastes of The Endless Plain and the rolling expanse of The Hundred Year Ocean stands The City, eternal and yet ever changing. Through its labyrinthine alleys and dusty plazas stumbles Mr Unpronounceable, seeker of secrets, a homeless necromancer, madman, sweating and delirious, moving from one horrifically comedic nightmare to the next.” (<a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0987211978 /ref=ase_wellingtoncit-21 ">Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Rage of Poseidon / Anders Nilsen. “Nilsen’s latest collection of six variations on Greek, Roman, and Hebrew myths and a single-panel serious joke mixing Greek and Christian deities he ventures into yet another manner: black-and-white silhouette. Each panel on the more than 40-foot accordion-fold page contains a single image over text. Sometimes the figures are black and the background white; sometimes vice versa.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Couch tag / Jesse Reklaw. “In this looping and circular five part autobiography about his family, youth, and early career, the author takes the mundane and gives it a part-comic, part-tragic twist.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Ten grand. Volume 1 / writer, J. Michael Straczynski ; artist, Ben Templesmith. “After button man Joe Fitzgerald fell in love with Laura, he tendered his resignation. But the button man assigned to Joe is a genuine demon, so after it kills Laura, and Joe is dying, an angel makes a proposal: work for the good guys and whenever he is offed, he will get five minutes with Laura before resurrecting for the next job. In this first volume of a new series, Joe takes the case of a missing girl who may be the victim of Laura’s killer.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) X. Volume 1, Big bad / story, Duane Swierczynski ; art, Eric Nguyen. “A masked vigilante known only as “X” dispenses justice without mercy to the criminals who rule the decaying city of Arcadia. When muckraking blogger Leigh Ferguson snoops down the wrong alley, she gets swept into X’s bloody war with a politically powerful crime lord.” (<a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1616552417 /ref=ase_wellingtoncit-21 ">Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Ghosted [1] : haunted heist / Joshua Williamson, writer ; Goran Sudzuka, artist. “Just busted out of prison, silver-tongued con man Jackson T. Winters can win permanent freedom if he can deliver a free-floating, full-torso, vaporous apparition to a filthy-rich collector. A suit, a shave, and one fantastic heist-crew-assembly montage later, Winters discovers that the old collector might have ulterior motives in sending him and his team to the old manor to find a ghost.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • South African writer Nadine Gordimer has died
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • The South African writer Nadine Gordimer died recently aged 90. A prolific writer, she dealt with the racial and moral issues of apartheid, with two of her novels being banned in South Africa during the apartheid regime. Her first novel, The Lying Days, was published in 1953. Thirteen novels later her last was published in 2012, titled No Time like the Present, in which she explored an interracial marriage in the new free South Africa. She published over 200 short stories, in some 13 short story collections, and was highly acclaimed for her astute and forthright essays. Nadine Gordimer received many prizes and awards, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991 and the Booker Prize in 1974 for her novel, The Conservationist.

    • New cookery books for July
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • New this month in our cookery collection are a great range of gluton-free, vegetarian, vegan and low-fat healthy food books for you to explore.  There’s bound to be some delicious and nourishing meat-free alternatives to try this winter season! Green Smoothies for Every Season : a year of farmer’s market-fresh super drinks / by Kristine Miles. “Drink the freshest superfoods each season has to offer. Capable of transforming your health in remarkable ways, leafy greens and fresh fruits are vital for living well and feeling great. Green Smoothies for Every Season provides the most effective way to harness the power of these antioxidant-rich superfoods with organic, fresh smoothies you can make at home.” (Syndetics summary) Baby & Toddler on the Go / Kim Laidlaw ; photographs by Thayer Allyson Gowdy ; illustrations by Lorena Siminovich. “Whether you are in a car, on a plane, or heading to daycare or the park, this colorful cookbook will show you how to quickly and easily cook and transport healthy, delicious meals and snacks for your baby or toddler. Bright, vivid, fun photographs and a colorful design bring the food and ideas to life.” (Syndetics summary) The Complete Leafy Greens Cookbook : 67 leafy greens and 250 recipes / Susan Sampson. “Sampson (200 Best Canned Fish and Seafood Recipes) provides a thorough resource for readers looking to expand their nutritious horizons with leafy green super foods. The highly diverse range of greens includes plants from the brassica-family (e.g., arugula, bok choy, cabbage, and tatsoi), lettuces (e.g., butter, romaine, and iceberg); and other assorted edible greens such as grape leaves, sorrel, and ramps. Sampson organizes each variety alphabetically, briefly discussing origins, culinary history, and general availability. She details storage, shelf life, and usage instructions, as well as nutrient content and even traditional medicinal uses, before moving on to recipes.” (Publisher Weekly) The Complete Juicer : a healthy guide to making delicious, nutritious juice and growing your own fruits and vegetables / Abigail R. Gehring. “With this book, you’ll learn which fruits and vegetables are the best for juicing and how you can grow them in a small garden plot, in pots in a windowsill or on a porch, or even right in your kitchen….In Grow and Juice you’ll find straight-forward instructions for growing beets, celery, spinach, kale, tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, sprouts, wheatgrass, and more!…Whether you’re new to juicing or already a stalwart supporter, you’ll find tips and recipes here that the whole family will love.” (Books in Print) Superfoods / editorial & food director Pamela Clark. “The recipes in this book feature super foods as the star ingredient for added energy and well-being. Included are a wonderfully diverse and healthy range of family-friendly recipes including grains, pulses, seafood, nuts, lean meat, fruit, soy and dairy products, vegetables, herbs and spices as our hero foods. Once you start eating food based on these super ingredients you’ll marvel at how well you feel each and every day.” (Syndetics summary) Low-Fat Family Food. “…The aim of this book is to help your famiy gain control over your eating habits to have you all looking good and feeling great in a matter of weeks. We understand that some family members may be more active than others so there are lots of helpful hints about how to adapt and add to the recipes. With meal plans for midweek, weekends and snacks, it’s never been more convenient to live a little healthier.” (Syndetics summary) Straight From the Earth : irresistible vegan recipes for everyone / Myra Goodman and Marea Goodman ; photographs by Sara Remington. “From Myra Goodman, the co-founder of Earthbound Fa rm, and her daughter Marea Goodman, comes Straight from the Earth, more than 90 creative vegan recipes that are so delicious you will change your mind about what it means to eat a plant-based diet.” (Book Jacket) Honestly Healthy for Life : healthy alternatives for everyday eating / Natasha Corrett, Vicki Edgson ; photography by Lisa Linder. “Honestly Healthy for Life shows how the alkaline way of eating can fit seamlessly into everyday life, This new collection of over 100 super-tasty and nutritious recipes created by gourmet vegetarian chef Natasha Correti and backed by the nutritional know-how of Vicki Edgson provides and easy route to great health and well-being.” (Book Jacket) Forest Feast : simple vegetarian recipes from my cabin in the woods / Erin Gleeson. “Step into the magical world of photographer and artist Erin Gleeson as she creates seasonal vegetarian dishes and watercolor illustrations inspired by her forest surroundings. After moving from New York City to a cabin in the woods near San Franscisco, Gleeson created her food blog, The Forest Feast where she shares simple recipes and entertaining ideas.” (Book Jacket) Quick Family Meals / editorial and food director, Pamela Clark. “100 recipes for complete one-pot meals for the family. Each meal will be cooked and ready to eat, looking splendid on the table in less than 45 minutes. There are curries, soups, stir-fries, bakes, grills and pan-fries. There are tips and hints to help you cook faster, better and more efficiently. There are also quick and easy dessert recipes.” (Syndetics summary) Real Fresh Gluten-free Food : simple healthy meals for everyone / Anna & Roger Wilde ; with photography by Daniel Allen. “A new and revised edition of Anna and Roger Wilde’s classic cookbook for healthy eating is made relevant for people with special dietary needs. Every recipe is now gluten-free and labelled dairy-free and vegan (where suitable) to provide quick reference for specific requirements. The authors provide recipe notes wherever possible and they give expert advice along with the key guidelines to achieving a healthy diet.”–Publisher information. Superfood Juices : 100 delicious, energizing & nutrient-dense recipes / Julie Morris. “Power up your juicer and pack more nutrition into your day! Whether you crave fruit juices or have a hankering for cleansing, purifying green juices, you’ll find them all here. From choosing the right machine to considering the health benefits of various juices, this book will spark experimentation, rejuvenation, and flavorful bliss one superfood sip at a time.” (Syndetics summary)

    • New Mysteries for July
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • New mystery fiction this month from some very popular authors, including Alafair Burke, Andrea Camilleri, Roger Jon Ellory and Karin Slaughter, who will be in conversation at Central Library on Tuesday evening 12th August at 6.00pm. Join us for a great evening. Lonely graves / Britta Bolt. “A suicide, a drowned man, or a sudden death. It’s all in a day’s work for Pieter Posthumus. In Amsterdam, the Lonely Funerals team exists to make sure that no one goes to the grave unmourned. Posthumus takes that responsibility seriously.A careful, humane man, he works hard to find out all he can about the anonymous or abandoned dead entrusted to his care. So when a young Moroccan immigrant is found in the Prinsengracht canal in suspicious circumstances, Posthumus cannot let it go. The police may call it accident or suicide; he is sure there’s more to it. He takes up the case, an investigation that leads to him getting caught up in a terror plot and in the way of an elite police unit.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) All day and a night : a novel of suspense / Alafair Burke. “The shocking murder of psychotherapist Helen Brunswick complicates an old case, as NYPD detective Ellie Hatcher and attorney Carrie Blank both search for the truth from opposite sides of the law. When similarities between Helen’s murder and those of past serial killer victims come to light and when an anonymous letter with inside information about Helen’s case that might exonerate the convicted killer arrives, the police are forced to reevaluate the previous cases. While Ellie is assigned to the “fresh look” team, Carrie goes to work for a celebrity lawyer specializing in wrongful convictions and representing Anthony Amaro, the man imprisoned for the murders.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Angelica’s smile / Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli. “Montalbano, who, perhaps, loves his antipasto more than his detective work, looks into a rash of copycat burglaries in the Sicilian coastal village of Vigata. Victims are carefully chosen for the fact that they have two homes to burglarize. One such victim is Angelica Cosulich, so drop-dead gorgeous that Montalbano can barely breathe, much less speak, in her presence. But the investigation must go on! Midnight stakeouts, threatening anonymous letters and even a puzzling murder ensue, all to the tune of those requisite seaside lunches and Angelica’s alluring smile.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Fatal harbor / Brendan DuBois. “Former Department of Defense analyst Lewis Cole has travelled some dark roads before in his quest for justice. Days after a violent anti-nuclear demonstration puts his best friend, police detective Diane Woods, in a near-fatal coma, Cole abandons his job and his home to find the man who nearly killed his friend. From the rural towns of New Hampshire to the offices of power and influence in Washington, D.C., Cole follows his gut and the flimsiest of clues to track down the cold-blooded attacker who won’t hesitate to kill to keep his identity and background secret.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Carnival of shadows / R.J. Ellory. “Kansas, 1959. A travelling carnival appears overnight in the small town of Seneca Falls, intriguing the townsfolk with acts of inexplicable magic and illusion. But when a man’s body is discovered beneath the carousel, with no clue as to his identity, FBI Special Agent Michal Travis is sent to investigate. Led by the elusive Edgar Doyle, the carnival folk range from the enigmatic to the bizarre, but none of them will give Travis a straight answer to his questions. With each new turn of the investigation, Doyle and his companions challenge Travis’s once unshakeable faith in solid facts and hard evidence. As the consequences of what has happened become ever more disturbing, Travis struggles to open his mind to a truth that defies comprehension.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Death of a scholar / Susanna Gregory. “In the summer of 1358 the physician Matthew Bartholomew returns to Cambridge to learn that his beloved sister is in mourning after the unexpected death of her husband, Oswald Stanmore. Oswald has left the business to his widow, but a spate of burglaries in the town distracts Matthew from supporting Edith in her grief. As well as the theft of irreplaceable items from Michaelhouse, which threatens its very survival, a new foundation, Winwick Hall, is causing consternation amongst Matthew’s colleagues. A perfect storm between the older establishments and the brash newcomers is brewing when the murder of a leading member of the Guild is soon followed by the death of one of Winwick’s senior Fellows. Assisting Brother Michael in investigating these fatalities leads Matthew into a web of suspicion.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Red light / Graham Masterton. “Somewhere in the city of Cork, a woman’s cry echoes through the rainy streets. On a bloodstained mattress in a grimy flat, a burly man lies dead. A terrified girl kneels over his body. She is half-naked, starving, screaming. She has been trapped here for three days. It doesn’t take DS Katie Maguire long to identify the murder victim. He is someone she has been trying to convict for years, a cruel and powerful pimp who terrorised the girls who worked for him. It’s Katie’s job to catch the killer. But with men like this dead, the city is safer and so are the scared young women who are trafficked into Cork. When a second pimp is horrifically murdered, Katie must decide. Should she do her job, or follow her conscience? Should she allow the killer to strike again?” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Dante’s poison / Lynne Raimondo. “Mark Angelotti, a psychologically troubled and newly blinded Chicago psychiatrist, is hired to help with the defense of legal eagle Jane Barrett for the murder of Rory Gallagher, a well-known journalist. It looks like Jane is being framed; Mark’s friend Hallie is Jane’s mentee, and she begs Mark to provide expert testimony. Unfortunately, a vicious attack on Mark and Hallie leaves her in a coma. Mark knows Hallie recognized the attacker, but he, of course, can’t. Concurrently, two troubling suicides by teen patients of one of Mark’s professional colleagues builds a strong secondary plot that might connect with the journalist’s murder.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Cop Town : a novel / Karin Slaughter. “It’s 1974 Atlanta, and another policeman has been shot by the man they’re calling the Shooter, yet his partner, Jimmy Lawson, is left physically unharmed but devastated. Jimmy’s sister Maggie, also a cop, is convinced that something is off about Jimmy’s version of events, but getting anyone to listen to her suspicions would only prove futile. After all, women weren’t very welcome on the police force in 1974 and they certainly didn’t investigate serious crimes. When she’s partnered with Kate Murphy, whose pampered background couldn’t be more different from Maggie’s solid blue-collar roots, events begin to escalate, and Kate and Maggie must put everything on the line to stop a ferocious killer.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Children of war / Martin Walker. “Bruno, chef de police in the French town of St Denis, is already busy with a case when the body of an undercover French Muslim cop is found in the woods, a man who called Bruno for help only hours before. But Bruno’s sometime boss and rival, the Brigadier, doesn’t see this investigation as a priority, there are bigger issues at stake. Bruno has other ideas. One of Bruno’s old army comrades helps to smuggle Sami, a Muslim youth from Afghanistan back to France, but the FBI aren’t far behind and a n American woman appears in St Denis with a warrant for Sami’s extradition. Bruno must unravel these multiple mysteries, amidst pressure from his bosses, and find his own way to protect his town and its people.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Common plant names for Māori Language Week
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • For many of New Zealand’s indigenous plants, the Māori name is the ‘common’ name, and English names are rarely, if ever, used; think rimu, tōtara, kauri, pōhutukawa, and mamaku. Other species have both Māori and English names, but it is the latter that is predominant, at least in my experience. Below are some such examples... Read more »

    • Amesbury Awesomeness Awards - Term 2, 2014
      • 23 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Congratulations to Leni Emerson Manoj (Harakeke) and Ishaan Patel (Koru) who were the recipients of the Amesbury Awesomeness Awards in Term 2, 2014.

    • Eugenie Sage on Back Benches TV
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • When:  Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 6:15pm - 7:15pm Where:  Backbenchers Pub Molesworth Street and PRIME TV at 10:30pm. Come and see Eugenie Sage on Back Benches tonight or watch on PRIME TV

    • Horsing around in Chipping Norton
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      • THE BALLAD OF HACKING’EM FAIR   Ian Blair, Ian Blair, lend me your bay mare. All along Wapping gone ethics gone spare For I want for to go to Hacking’em Fair, With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson, Flame Becky - all bareback an all Andy Coulson, Flame Becky - all bareback an all   And when shall I see again my bay mare? Chipping not Norton not - not that I care Of tapping or snapshot or entrapment so bare With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and Becky Brooks - braving a fall Andy Coulson and Becky Brooks - braving a fall   So they harnessed and bridled the old bay mare, Raisa the police horse, with scarcely a care And off they plotted to Hacking’em fair, With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson And Andy and Becky and Charlie - all having a ball And Andy and Becky and Charlie - all having a ball.   Then Friday came, and Saturday noon. All along down along reckoning soon But Ian’s old Raisa hath not trotted home, With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and Mrs B - all too close to call Andy Coulson and Mrs B - all too close to call.   So the Commissioner got up to the top o' the hill And he seed his old mare down a-making her will, With Cameron astride in his cavalry twill With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and Rebekah - all riding so tall Andy Coulson and Rebekah - all riding so tall.   Poor Raisa the mare - she took sick and she died All along, down along when the hackers were tried. And Dave he sat down on a stone, and he cried With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and the Chestnut - four-faulting the wall Andy Coulson and the Chestnut - four-faulting the wall.   But this isn't the end o' this shocking affair. With Raisa and Becky dead-horsing it there Nor, though it be dread, of the horrid career Of Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and the Witch - all casting a pall Andy Coulson and the Witch - all casting a pall.   When justice is sought in the cold morning light The voters will ask whether all this is right When Murdoch the trainer was kept out of sight, With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and Hot Bex- all hacking your call Andy Coulson and Hot Bex - all hacking your call.   And all the long night be heard skirling and groans. All along, down along, democracy moans From Raisa the police horse rattling her bones, With Glenn Mulcaire, Nev Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw Stu Kuttner, Jim Weatherup, Ian Edmondson Andy Coulson and Game Becky - still chuckling an all Andy Coulson and Game Becky - still chuckling an all.  SEE ALSO http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2012/mar/05/rebekah-brooks-horse http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/hacking-trial-rebekah-brooks-raisa-and-a-new-twist-in-the-saga-of-a-horse-fit-for-a-pm-minister-9619891.html

    • Wine, architecture and the tourism experience
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Architecture is a key factor in the creation of food and wine tourism experiences say researchers at Victoria University of Wellington.

    • Wellington Transport Cold War Rolls On: Reactions to the Flyover Decision (No one wins – Amalgamation gets closer)
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • Whether you agreed with the flyover of not, the reaction to it being dumped is interesting. Anyone who had an interest in this can’t help but blurt out their reaction publicly with over twelve press releases since late yesterday and counting. What is clear is that once again we have a stalemate in the Wellington Transport Cold War, this time with the Greens (including their party) taking credit (hey it’s election year) for the “win” while the scattered remainder are left to point out their view of the folly of the decision. Let me get my view on the table up front. I was a fence sitter when it came to the flyover. Personally, if someone tried to build a massive edifice in my back yard I would fight it. Let’s face it, we all would. So you can’t blame the NIMBY factor here, they came prepared, fought, and “won”. My view is that the traffic in wellington continues to be more and more congested (this is backed up by studies), now even at off peak times, and it seems wise to separated North to South and East to West traffic at the Basin. The basin is one of the serious choke points in the city. So the answer is not to do nothing, as we see here, but to make the correct decision to ease the issue. It’s also my view that the consultation process around this and other city initiatives is badly broken. What we see is that a very small but vocal minority can organise themselves to seem a lot bigger than they are. This skews consultation badly. We see it in this case where the vast majority of respondents were against it (more than 83%) but local surveys showed that the residents were split fifty fifty. Local surveys show that the vast majority of residents to do not trust the consultation process, let alone understand it, and simply have given up on Council. Anyway, on with the show. The Greens On the left we have the Greens, again,  with Julie Ann-Genter hailing the decision as one of “common sense” and using the decision as a grandstanding election issue: “This decision is a victory for common sense. National’s obsession with motorways is wasteful and unpopular,” Ms Genter said. “National should take note of the decision and put resources into upgrading public transport and cycle lanes, which cost less and create a more vibrant city.” – Source Once again we have the usual anti-anything other than car or bus rhetoric from Ms Genter with no actual practical alternatives offered to alleviate or progress alternative traffic options in the city. Let’s not forget, since we got this Green leaning Council, public transport has gone backwards, not forwards, with declining numbers, massive safety issues, increasing cost, and declining service. Let’s also not forget that the Green party has pet Councillors on the WCC who will vote in line with the party, not the people, which should give them leverage to improve public transport for example. The reality is that the green bloc in Council, over the past two terms, have achieved nothing in the transport area at all. Let’s not forget something else. Back in the dim an distant past when we first looked at building the bypass we were going to deal with a lot of these kind of issues. Part of that was to put the East West portion in trenches so that streets like Taranaki (North South) did not interact with the traffic. If my memory serves me correctly, in order to get the bypass signed off, the Green’s demanded that their be no trenches, amongst other things. One wonders if we would have needed to have spent what must be tens of millions of taxpayers money on this particular exercise if we had got that right the first time around, diverting traffic down an unimpeded North South route, alleviating stress on the Basin. Labour Taking a similar stand to the Greens, being one of grandstanding in election year, Labour hails the decision as a “victory for sustainable transport.” “The rejection of the proposed Basin Reserve flyover by a Board of Inquiry is a victory for sustainable transport in Wellington and paves the way for other alternatives to be given a fair hearing, Wellington Labour MPs Grant Robertson and Annette King say.” – Source Ummm… OK, how? I’m going with this release as possibly the most moronic of all of them. No alternatives are proposed, this is nothing more than a desperate press statement from a party that is highly-unlikely to be around come the end of September this year. It is NOT a victory for “sustainable transport” at all. What are they chasing, Green votes? You’d be cringing if you were a card carrying Labour member in Council with that kind of press release. NIMBY’s The NIMBY’s are no doubt delighted, as I would be. Their property values won’t decline and they won’t have to look at a massive edifice outside their penthouse apartments. Here’s some cutouts: “The Board of Inquiry has made the only logical decision based on the evidence that emerged during the four-month enquiry hearings” – Save The Basin “Cycle Aware Wellington has congratulated the Basin Bridge Board of Inquiry for declining resource consent for the NZTA’s proposed Basin Reserve flyover.” - Cycle Aware Wellington “The Board of Inquiry on the Basin Bridge flyover has made the only sensible choice for a project with no pedestrian benefits despite its position adjacent to three of the largest secondary schools in Wellington and one of the most walkable parts of the city.” – Living Streets “Our practice is very pleased with the Board of Inquiry’s decision to decline NZTA’s Basin Bridge Project. We are equally pleased that the Board has accepted the evidence we submitted against NZTA’s project on behalf of the Mt Victoria Residents Association and ourselves.”- Richard Reid / Citymakers “The Civic Trust thinks that a farsighted, long term, multi-modal transportation solution is needed between The Terrace and the airport.” – Wellington Civic Trust They won. Now a couple of things to remember. The first is that a lot of these lobby groups are, if not created by the green bloc, are seeded by them. Secondly, in all those press releases, go and read them, there are no alternatives to the issue proposed. Stalemate. The Wellington City Council Wow. If we ever needed evidence that the Council can’t and won’t work together it is this. “Divisions are emerging among Wellington City Councillors after the release of a decision that scuttles a proposed flyover at the historic Basin Reserve.” – Source Ha. They’ve been there for years. On our left ladies and gentleman, the green bloc and on our right, the champions of common sense, somewhere (piggy) in the middle, Andy Foster, our Transport Portfolio leader. “Mr Foster told Radio New Zealand’s Checkpoint programme there is no Plan B for the flyover and its rejection means other projects will not happen. “The duplication of the Mount Victoria tunnel; cycleways which were proposed from the city right out to the eastern suburbs; the bus rapid transit, which we’ve agreed to work on, is also significantly compromised; and there’s a whole range of urban amenity projects.” Andy actually said from memory “this will set us back ten years.“ Here’s the Mayor, who apparently is around, but not much interested in engaging on other issues, like the Alternative Giving screw up: “Just as the Council has found, the flyover proposal presented the Board of Inquiry a complex issue of urban design and transport, including public transport,” says the Mayor. “It is now time to get on and make the best of our role in improving all aspects of traffic to reduce congestion, including better walking, cycling, and public transport.” – Source Note, no mention of cars, taxis, trucks, or other vehicular traffic. Justin Lester, apparently the Deputy Mayor, wins the weakest response competition. “From here we will need to work constructively with our communities and government agencies to find a publically acceptable solution to the traffic congestion issues in this area,” he says. How will that happen? No plan B. As for the other Councillors, well, Iona Pannett is obviously delighted, anything that falls into the ideological green world she lives in is likely to do that. Otherwise, they are all very quiet… Reaction from the Region The green bloc lives in a little bubble sustained by less than 140,000 residents out of a wider region of hundreds of residents. Of most importance to the other cities in our region is unimpeded access to and from the airport and the industrial sites out at Rongotai. Here’s Fran Wilde: “The Basin Reserve area is a pivotal part of the local transport system – linking the CBD to the eastern and southern suburbs. But it is also a crucial link in the State Highway route to Wellington Airport and Wellington Hospital which are regional destinations. This area has been identified for years now as being in serious need of improvement. It’s a bottleneck for cars, buses, emergency vehicles and freight vehicles and the walking and cycling facilities are sub-optimal. “Separating traffic at the Basin was an integral part of our plans for bus rapid transit through the central CBD to Newtown and further out to Kilbirnie and the eastern suburbs. Wellington needs a modern, convenient, high frequency bus system and it’s long overdue. We remain absolutely committed to bus rapid transit but we’ll now need to modify our planning for such a system.” – Source Now, while Fran makes a very good point, her Greater Wellington Regional Council is also responsible for the decay in public transport within Wellington City proper, something which they refuse to take responsibility for. Increased prices, decreased patronage, and reducing services. She also seems to be saying that investment in bus rapid transit could be at risk as a result. Watch that one. Regardless, we see no Plan B. The Porirua City Council pulls no punches: The decision not to proceed with the Basin Reserve flyover is devastating for the Wellington region and is a classic example of why “some form of local government amalgamation needs to happen,” says Porirua Mayor Nick Leggett. “I’ve noticed some politicians already rejoicing at this backward decision and some others looking to re-allocate the $90 million to their own parochial projects. There still needs to be a future proofed solution at the Basin. This is about an efficient economic highway between Wellington airport and the Manawatu/Rangitikei which in reality is a conduit for prosperity for the lower North Island.” – Source Nick has hit on a couple of interesting things. First, that it is actually State Highway One so it goes well beyond the local government area, and into an entire part of the North Island that is currently being impacted by traffic congestion with no end in sight. Second, use of the word “amalgamation”. The Cold War between green bloc and the right will be broken by Central Government, eventually Gerry Brownlee described the decision as “disappointing”. Privately, Central Government is sick to their back teeth with the WCC’s inaction on this and other initiatives along with their perceived poor engagement. This decision, and the Council’s reaction to it, will further reinforce that frustration and include more fuel to the amalgamation move. It’s coming people, all the signs are there, we already have Councillors in several cities within Wellington angling to find positions for themselves on a “Super Council.” We can assume that after this next election the hammer is going to come down on this, it won’t be an election issue because it is not seen as popular. But the signs are there, several Councillors talking about it amongst themselves across Wellington, working groups, the news release this week on reducing red tape in Councils, and so on. The cost of these processes and consultations with no resolution is massive. The power that a bloc has at a very small level can have a huge impact on an effectively balkanized region and you can guarantee that National will remove those. That will mean amalgamation and any chance of self-determination will be lost in the mass of a super Council. There is an old saying; “Do it to them, before they do it to you.” In this case, we are going to get it done to us because none of us will work together. So in summary, I am going to quote Councillor Simon Woolf in his recent open blog: “I am going to get myself into trouble here. The Island Bay Cycle lane issues have highlighted many aspects which are holding up Wellington’s progress. The biggie is we have a small minority of Wellingtonian’s who are selfish, and do not take a wider view of a situation. They are strung up with self-interest, and take a live for today approach. There is no compromise, no generosity to work with others, and little, if any good will.  All three sides in the first stage of the Island Bay Cycle Lane process have people guilty of self-interest, who are slowing things down,  with some personalities working with the intent of not allowing any progress at all!” Cold War Mentality. If we can’t figure out a way to work together on these and other issues to make some progress then you can be sure that it will “get done to us”. It may be too late. When it comes to transport, that job belongs to Andy Foster, but he seems to be struggling between various interests and we are seeing no overall progress. On anything. But that’s another blog. Maybe we need someone else to take over and do it for us?      

    • Bus for Semi Final | Ories v HOBM
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Oriental Rongotai Football Club
      • SEMI-FINAL Buses will leave the clubrooms for the Hutt Rec at 1:15pm Get on board and support our premier side as they look to make their 4th Final in 4 years $5 return Get the Black & White gears on and show your true colours. Don't forget the Junoir club are having a function at the clubrooms on Saturday night O-TIDE

    • Law 4.1f – mouth guard compulsory
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • With semis & finals coming up, this is a reminder that mouth guards are compulsory for all players – please ensure you add it to your “pre-game discussion” so as to give everyone time to source their equipment as required” more »

    • Results – Sunday 20th July 2014
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Waikanae Golf Club
      • Weekend Men After a tight qualifying competition played in tough winter weather, the round 1 details for the Men’s Pairs Handicap Matchplay are:   1 8:25 a.m. GARY COUTTS JEREMY SIMPSON CHRIS TURNER DAVID MORETE   1 8:35 a.m. PETER BURLEIGH GARY TURNER KELLY HOUGHTON MATT HOBSON   1 8:45 a.m. IAN MORBY HUGH SHIELDS PHILIP CARTHEW IAN TRIM   1 8:55 a.m. STU MCLAREN CRAIG PHELPS CHRIS DERBIDGE ALISTAIR GARVIE A top quality field that is sure to provide some engrossing battles. Round 1 takes place this Sunday, 27th July. Good luck to all competitors.

    • Student film to screen at international festival
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • A film created by a Victoria University of Wellington student is a finalist in the non-narrative category of the 2014 Uni Shorts International Student Film Festival.

    • Surprise, surprise, SURPRISE: the answer is NOT a flyover!
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Eye of the Fish
      • Well, my abilities at prediction are evidently way off the mark – as noted in the previous post, the Board of Inquiry have returned their verdict, and the result is an (almost) resounding defeat for the proponents of the Flyover – the Resource Consent is declined. I’m delighted to have been shown to be so stupidly wrong in that the Board would rubber-stamp the Flyover application – instead, in a 572 page document issued today, the decision has been to say NO to the flyover. Not unanimously however – while three of the Board agreed, one member disagreed, and the comments that McMahon makes on this shows how close the decision is / was / may still be. It is not necessarily over yet… Already, of course, the idiots who post on Stuff without thinking are getting their ill-informed comments in: Kainga – Goodnight Wellington. Might as well scrub the plans for the runway extension too before you turn off the lights- Louis 57 – what a load of rubbish! A few busybodies in Wellington decide to snarl traffic for decades to come. Wellington would not be a great city without the support of the entire country. It is NOT up to just the people who live in the city. Stupid decision! sue62 – Poor decision by are farcical Board – I will be surprised if those responsible for running this 4 month long and expensive circus will get another commission. This is up there, along with declining the Hilton on the wharf, as bad decisions for Wellington. and a reply to that from: Tough Kiwi – of course they will mate, it’s just what wade brown wants just another bunch of pathetic yes men while she builds the city of her dreams, all bikes and no cars, industry, jobs. Funny how a greenie has put in so many traffic lights and controls to slow traffic down and allow cyclist (who pay nothing for the road they ride on), now it takes ten minutes longer to travel from the terrace to Courtney place, lets see 10 min * 85000 cars a day that’s about how many extra litres of fumes pumping into the atmosphere, the mind boggles. Luckily, not all the comments are as stupid and ill-informed as those. Perhaps, in the words of David Lange, its time for a sit-down and a cup of tea. Perhaps NZTA can take a few deep breaths, ignore that itch to go back to court over this, and sit down and do some decent planning, and decent thinking, about what they do next.

    • Fame - the musical
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Girls' College
      • Tickets are on sale now via the school office. Click here for photos of the latest rehearsal

    • Second Afterlife [Review]
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Salient
      • YOUNG AND HUNGRY ARTS FESTIVAL – 5 stars Second Afterlife, written by Ralph McCubbin Howell and directed by Kerryn Palmer, was an absolute joy to behold. A modern, exciting quest narrative with intriguing, well-developed characters, Second Afterlife will totally absorb you into its bizarre comical world, which resides eerily close to our own. Exploring themes such as internet privacy, social fads and teenage hormone imbalance, this play is all too relevant in the most embarrassing ways. My only critique of this thematic work was that it was certainly one for the internet fad followers and at time became too in-jokey, but this is unavoidable: long story short the only way you won’t enjoy this piece is if you’ve never engaged with social networking, and thus potentially don’t understand it. The actors in Second Afterlife were incredibly strong, with a special mention to Mahalia Sinclair-Parker who absolutely owned the stage and bought the ferocity of a much older actress to her various roles. This being said the other cast members – Bronwyn Ensor, Michael Hebenton, Kieren Kleinschmidt, James Russell and Ruby Hansen – were similarly polished, precise, and had excellent sustained energy throughout. Above and beyond what talent and thorough rehearsal can bring, the cast also dealt with wigs falling off and various classic-opening-night-costume-mishaps with excellent jesting improvisation, which was a delight to see. On this note, costume designer Chido Dimairo also deserves special mention for a myriad of beautiful and at times hilarious costume work. Alongside this the amazing specificity and sharpness of the projection design – Anna Robinson – and lighting design – Joanna Dibley – made the world of the play believable and crisp. The excellent colour scheme and costuming was very emotionally effective and made for a clear other world which we openly accepted and enjoyed discovering alongside the protagonist. Sound design and performance – Philip Jones – was another highlight of this already solid piece. Performing wolf cries, charged live guitar, and warping and reworking established songs from the past, Jones bought energy, humour and warmth to the stage, while maintaining a comically serious expression. The directorial choice to have him be visible and perform live was a brilliant one, as we can see how artificial the world of the internet is, even as we are emotionally swept away with it. On this note assistant directors Jess Old and Ryan Knighton must also be mentioned for their hard work in making this production so slick and clean, as well as Allan Henry, fight mentor and Andrew Paterson, Tango mentor, all of whom contributed to this being a hilarious, beautiful, and surprisingly poignant play. I left the theatre frankly wanting more, which is not to say it left anything wanting… it was just that bloody good!

    • Workshops for August - December 2014
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • SeniorNet Wellington Inc
      • The forthcoming workshops for August -  December can be viewed on the Go to Workshops Page in the left column of this site. They will each be advertised for registration some days before the event.

    • iPad Beyond Basics into the Planet of the Apps - Tuesday 5 August ,10.00 am to 12.00 Noon
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • SeniorNet Wellington Inc
      • When: Tuesday 5 August 10.00 am to 12.00 Noon Where: Anvil House, Level 1 Room 2 What: There are over a million apps in the AppStore for iPhone and 590,000 for iPad. Apps are the extensions and life blood to the functionality of your iPad. Come and hear Peter Chik share his extensive use of some interesting apps to: • Create group emails • Create slide shows and videos with music and transitions. • OCR snippets of a newspaper clipping with multilingual translation. • Scan and convert a document into PDF • Annotate, reorganise and sign a PDF document • Create a spreadsheet, a Word document and publish an electronic book. • Organise a searchable photo database • Construct a simple memory system • Create a mind map for a project • Direct capture business card details into your contacts. • Wireless transfer photos from your wifi camera to iPad • Watch her plane land on your iPad before you pick up your mother in law • Use magic to produce your credit card from your iPad to pay for your coffee, etc. To assist in maximising mileage for our iPad attendees, please email Peter Moon with particulars of any topic of interest that you would like the lecture to include. The investment is $5 payable at the door. Correct change please As the workshop is limited to 20 individuals please register ASAP with Peter Moon. peteraumoon@yahoo.co.nz ________________________________________ Please note: A repeat of this workshop will be run on Friday 15 August 10.00 am to 12.00 Noon, Anvil House, Level 1 Room 2  As the workshop is limited to 20 individuals please register ASAP with John Nimmo john.nimmo@xtra.co.nz  The investment is $5 payable at the door. Correct change please

    • Under 18 and Under 16 Football Tournament Report 2014 (Brisbane)
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • Previously our Football 1st XI has attended a week-long Brisbane-based Football tournament known as Southern Skies.  For 2014, it was decided to take both an Under 18 and Under 16 team to the rebranded High Energy Youth Tournament.  Both teams were made up of players from a number of our Saturday teams and consisted of many younger players.  read more

    • Basin Flyover decision victory for common sense
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • The Green Party welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority's draft decision announced today not to allow the $90 million Basin Reserve flyover in Wellington to proceed. "Both popular and expert opinion opposed the flyover. The proposal was expensive, unnecessary and would have undermined the Basin's heritage value," said Green Party transport spokesperson Julie Anne Genter. The EPA today released its draft decision not to allow the controversial project to proceed. Of 215 submissions received by the EPA, 83 percent opposed the flyover in full, or in part. Ms Genter was an expert witness at the hearing. "This decision is a victory for common sense. National's obsession with motorways is wasteful and unpopular," Ms Genter said. "National should take note of the decision and put resources into upgrading public transport and cycle lanes, which cost less and create a more vibrant city. "Every day the Government says we can't afford wasteful public spending, yet the Basin Reserve flyover had a poor cost benefit analysis and is more costly than other options. "NZTA's own data shows declining traffic volumes on the propose route. The flyover was a solution looking for a problem. "A poll this week sent a clear message to the Government over its transport priorities - give us better public transport rather than more roads. "The vast majority of people coming into Wellington take public transport, cycle or walk. People want frequency, reliability and affordability. "Investment in public transport as well as cycle lanes would have the double dividend of enhancing the transport most people use and further reducing car traffic. "A massive concrete motorway flyover was an invitation for future urban decay and crime. It is the exact opposite of smart transport planning, and the EPA clearly understood this. "A smart, green approach to transport gets more people and freight moving, while enhancing the valuable land in the central city." A final decision will be made on August 30.

    • The Berry Boys: Hot of the press (well almost)
      • 22 Jul 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • This coming August marks a climax of Te Papa’s Berry Boys soldier identification project, with the screening of a documentary on seven of the soldiers on TVNZ in early August (details to come), and the launch of Berry Boys: Portraits of First World War Soldiers and Families by Te Papa Press. The latter brings all of the soldier portraits... Read more »

    • Wellington City Council fails to take responsibility for failed “e-homeless” campaign
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • You’re walking down Lambton Quay, a homeless person is sitting with their back to a shop. “Excuse me, can you spare some change.” You whip out your $900 smart phone, bend down next to the unfortunate, and show them you txting a $3 donation to the e-homeless service, you smile benignly. “Thank you sir,” says the homeless person with tears in their eyes, “you are very generous.” Yeah right. As we reported a few days ago the Council tried to quietly dump their “Alternative Giving” campaign, it came out via an Auckland media source. We said that it was unfair that the proponents of the scheme, being the Mayor and Stephanie Cook (now retired), did not apologise for the colossal waste of money rather left a Council Officer to do it. We also said that the reason they gave for dumping it, that we were confused, was ridiculous. The Dominion Post has picked up the story today  and managed to further push themselves into yet another Public Relations disaster. “A $40,000 campaign to reduce begging on Wellington streets has been quietly ditched, with the council saying many people were simply confused by it. The “alternative giving” campaign was meant to encourage people to give money to charities rather than giving it directly to beggars – but it raised just $3500 in eight months. Wellington City Council has now shelved the programme indefinitely and is advising the public not to use the alternative giving campaign website or text donation service.” You would think someone would have actually told the Council as their website still has the service up and running with instructions on how to use it. Now, the service itself was stupid. It sent a very clear message to the residents that they shouldn’t give change to the homeless on the street that they should send it off electronically to some middle-man company that would then distribute it to various charities. It created an excuse whereby we didn’t have to worry about throwing some change in a hat and could simply walk on by. Technology in some circumstances, no matter how smart, will often create a division and backfire, as it has here. The reality is that the Mayor bulled on with this scheme for well-over a year despite a lot of public opposition (what else is new) and have basically lost $36,500 which would have gone a very long way to supporting very necessary charities and vulnerable residents. Given that, I don’t think it is at all unreasonable for the Council to apologise for their actions to the homeless and pledge that same amount of money to those charities by way of showing they mean it. It. Failed. So what has been their response? “Despite the lack of tangible results, the council is defending the cost of the campaign, saying it helped raise “public awareness” about begging. Councillor Paul Eagle, who chairs the community, sport and recreation committee, said the campaign had been stopped while the council assessed its impact – not because it hadn’t worked. “If I thought it was a complete mess, I would tell you, but I don’t.” The council would be briefed on its impact in the next few months, but Eagle believed it had helped to reduce begging. “I do think it is money well spent.”” And; “Council spokesman Richard MacLean said the campaign ran into “marketing and technology” difficulties, with people struggling to grasp how to donate.” Let’s break that down into English shall we? It raised public awareness about begging. The council does not think it was a complete mess. It has reduced begging. The council thinks it it was money well spent. People didn’t know how to use it. Well, rubbish: It sure did raise public awareness, the overwhelming response from the public was one of incredulity that the Council wanted to use this as a tool to drive beggars off the street rather than dealing with the real issues of homelessness. It is a complete mess. The Council refuses to recognise this, and that kind of attitude is why we have mad schemes and spending that is completely out of control on dubious pet projects. The Council thinks it has reduced begging. Two points here; one, clearly that was what they wanted in the first place, rather than dealing with the issue, looking for a way to drive the homeless of the street and second, it hasn’t. The Council would do well to spend more time walking around the city, because if they did, they’d notice, like all of us, the number has increased significantly.  As for money well spent, then someone has rocks in their head. That’s like saying, I’ll spend $1 on a mechanism to give you money of which you will get 10 cents. $40,000 spent, $3,500 to the homeless. Are the Councillors calculators manufactured in Bali? People knew how to use it. You sent a txt to a three digit number. That was it. People chose NOT to use it. Here are a few questions: Why is it that this Council can’t be up front and transparent with us with this issue? Why is it that this Council chooses to spend more time spinning media releases on things that are clearly dumb than actually accepting they blew it, admitting it, learning from their mistakes and moving forward? Why is Paul Eagle fronting this now, and where is the greatest supporter of this failed scheme, the Mayor? What does the Mayor think about this? Why did the Council deliberately choose to try and whisper this PR failure out quietly? Why can the Council not apologise for failing, like any responsible adult? This latest response damages the credibility of the Council in my opinion. The logic of their response to it, once caught up by the Dominion Post, is completely mad. It defies logic and belongs in the realms of Dr Seuss.    

    • Art Exhibition and Auction 7pm, Friday, 1 August, 2014
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • The first ever Amesbury School Art Exhibition & Auction is going to be held on Friday 1st August, from 7:00-9:00pm.   Some details are still to be finalised, but here's what we can tell you so far: Tickets will be $5.00 per person, which includes light food refreshment. Don't forget to invite grandparents, aunts, uncles.  Please order tickets to this event by following this link to an online form. This event will be R18, due to the presence of alcohol on site. 7:00pm: Arrival & Refreshments Viewing of artwork from 7pm.  Refresments will be available free of charge. Hopefully there will be live background music.Drinks will be on sale, including wine, beer, shandy, fruit juice & lemonade. 8:00pm: Auction commences Student artwork: All students will have one piece of framed artwork up for auction. We will have "buy now" prices on all student artworks and a minimum price - to ensure we cover costs and make a small profit. All items will be available to purchase via a "silent auction" - you will be able to add your name and price to a bid list for selected artworks or you might begin with the "buy now" price to ensure no-one else purchases the piece of artwork you want.  We will also take commissions. If there is a piece of artwork by a student you particularly like but it has already been purchased, we will see if the artist is prepared to be commissioned to do one for you at the "buy now" price. In this situation, profit will be shared by the school and the student. Artist-in-residence artwork: We are very fortunate that we will also have 20 pieces available for sale by Colin Gibbs, our artist-in-residence. These framed paintings (Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar Varnish) all depict the Churton Park landscape. The school will receive a 30% commission on sales. These artworks will also be sold through the silent auction. They will have a reserve price (see the prices below) and people can make bids above that price.  Artworks will not be available for sale prior to 8pm and unsold artworks will continue to be available for sale for the week following the auction. The school will purchase or commission some artworks by students for display around the school. At 8:00pm, a bell will sound and the serious business of the silent auction will begin!   ​9:00pm: Evening ends with lots of happy parents going home with awesome art work! ​We will have details of other things happening on the evening closer ​to the date - watch this space.... ​ G i b b s L a n g contemporary art gallery and studio mobile 027 2484884                                                        www.gibbslang.co.nz We are pleased to provide the paintings as follows for the Amesbury School exhibition at the reserve prices listed below: (1) small         Churton Park             Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar varnish  (framed)$150 (6)  36 x 28mm (glass-size)   Churton Park                       Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar varnish  (framed)$385 each (6)  51 x 41mm (glass-size)   Churton Park                       Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar varnish  (framed)$585 each (5) 790 x 890mm (glass-size) Churton Park                     Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar varnish  (framed)$850 each (2) 790 x 990mm (glass-size)   Churton Park                   Italian oil paint on French Arches Huile (300gm) paper, finished with Damar varnish  (framed) $900 each

    • LINEOUT to MAUL – DEFENCE
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • Many of you will be aware of a lineout tactic adopted at the recent Junior World Championship whereby the non-ball-winning team chooses NOT to make physical contact with the players of the ball-winning team, once the ball has been thrown-in more »

    • Hardham and Jubilee Cup Finals appointments
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • Hardham Cup Final (Sunday August 3): Referee: Vincent Ringrose AR’s:       C.Graham, S.Kennedy Jubilee Cup Final (Sunday August 3): Referee: Ben O’Keeffe AR’s:       R.Gordon, N.Hogan

    • Hardham and Jubilee Cup Semi Final appointments
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Rugby Referees Association
      • Hardham Cup Semi Finals (Saturday 26th July): Norths v Avalon @ Porirua Park 2.30pm Referee: Scott Kennedy AR#1:     W.Bowden Poneke v Wellington @ Kilbirnie Park 2.30pm Referee: Chris Graham AR#1:     B.Jackman Jubilee Cup Semi Finals (Saturday more »

    • NZSTA Conference Presentation
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • A small team of BOT members and staff attended the NZSTA Conference held at Auckland's Sky City Conference venue over the weekend. It was not quite as big as the Eductech Conference in Brisbane but was pretty big by New Zealand standards - 870 attendees. We were invited to present a seminar at the conference about our take on 21st century learning. The topic was, "21st century learning - fad or forever?" (Note the nifty alliteration!).We spoke to about 160 board and staff members about the thinking that sits behind our approach to delivering education at Amesbury School and then we went on to talk about some of the systems and structures we have developed or are developing that enable this approach. We have presented to a number of audiences recently - Ministry, APs/DPs, Principals, Teachers, Board of Trustees - and we have noticed a significant increase in the drive to create change towards 21st century learning or, as we call it, humanising education. What people are particularly interested in is that we are not focused on technology and we are not focused on the modern environments but that our approach is first and foremost focused (note... more alliteration) on pedagogy - the theory of teaching and learning. This interest is particularly noticeable in the Professional Learning Community that we are in the process of setting up. People from all over the lower part of the North Island and as far afield as Te Karaka near Gisborne and Hawkes Bay are looking for others to collaborate with around future-focused pedagogy. It is such a privilege to be a part of this growing interest. There is a growing sense that with the requirement for 5 out of 5 students to be successful in school (Minister Hekia Parata), a different approach is not a choice but an imperative. In the traditional way of delivering curriculum there was the expectation (and acceptance of the fact) that some students would not be successful in our school system and that is, of course, exactly what happened. Some students still leave the school system with no qualifications. In the thoughts of Einstein, it would be insanity to think that the same system and way of doing things would produce a different result. Therefore, if the expectation is that all students will leave school having experienced success at school, then we have to change the way schooling is done. This is the journey we are on. At the beginning of my presentation I gave the one-to-two minute explanation or summary of the presentation - so that people who felt they had got the idea from that short explanation could leave and go to another seminar. Here it is for you..... (Btw, I don't think anyone did leave). 1.     21st century learning is a massive, paradigmatic shift that needs to take place in order for our students to be prepared for the future they will face.  2.      The traditional/industrial age model of education which still significantly characterises schools of today is no longer able to meet the needs of its 21stcentury students and, as a result, there is a growing gap between the education our students need and the education they are receiving. Change is an imperative.3.      Do not underestimate how difficult this shift is to make. It is HUGE! And as a result do not over-estimate how much progress we have made towards it as a schooling system. There have been some shifts made but these are largely shallow and there is little evidence of deep change.4.      Creating deep change will require some quite different ways of thinking and acting and relating by all stakeholders associated with schools – teachers, students, parents, school leaders, trustees and the Ministry.5.      No one stakeholder group can make this change on their own. It will require all stakeholders working together, thinking in new ways to create this change. More than this, it will require wider networks to be forged including between schools and schools and ministry. To move forward we will need each other.6.      As the kaitiaki – the caretakers or the governors of schools– you – have an absolutely pivotal role in leading this change – not just supporting it. We think this will mean a significant expansion in what you see as being in your purview as board members. You will need to develop significant knowledge of 21stcentury learning and the challenges of shifting towards it. 7.      The thing that we want most from the session is for you to go away empowered, excited and more confident about your role in creating your school’s and NZ’s educational future.

    • Feature films & documentaries at this year’s festival
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • It’s that time again! The 24th International Film Festival opens this Friday, and some of our favourite filmmakers are back with their new films. They include David Cronenberg, Ken Loach, Dardenne Brothers, Jean-Luc Godard, Richard Linklater, Wim Wenders, Michel Gondry, Kelly Reichardt, Andrey Zvyagintsev and this year’s Palme O’dor winner Nuri Bilge Ceylan. A lot of their previous movies are available at our libraries. Click their names to check them for pre- or post-festival viewings. Also, if you’re a documentary fan you won’t be disappointed. As usual, a great number of documentaries, from arts, music, science, nature to politics, are featured in the festival. Some documentaries showcased last year are now on our shelves. Check them out. Blackfish 20 Feet From Stardom Blackfish The crash reel Mistaken for strangers The moo man Pussy Riot : a punk prayer The spirit of ’45 A band called Death The act of killing The gatekeepers Winter is a great time for movie lovers. Enjoy!

    • Cupie Hoodwink’s Guide to Birth Control
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Salient
      • If you haven’t gathered already, unless you’re 100 per cent sure that you and your boo are clean, then you can’t look past a condom or dental dam as the hottest accessory for your sexy time. That being said, if you’re in a committed, (hetero)sexual relationship, and not looking to make a mini-you anytime soon, then it pays to shop around to find the birth control method that best suits you. As an added bonus to this week’s sass on safe sex, here is Cupie Hoodwink’s Guide to Birth Control. The Pill When Mum first sat me down to tell me about periods I was so excited that I ran to the toilet the next morning and was bitterly disappointed to discover that it hadn’t arrived overnight. A period, I reasoned, was an indelible mark of womanhood; a secret that I really wanted to be a part of. When I first got my period a few years later, I soon realised how silly I’d been. Periods were inconvenient, painful, and the only indelible mark of womanhood they left was a stain on my undies. Reality hit me just as hard when it came to taking the pill. Before taking the pill, I was gleeful about the prospect of doing so. The pill would cure my irregular periods, which would stop me from spending so much on unnecessary pregnancy tests, and it made me feel grown up and responsible — I even set a daily alarm on my Nokia 2280 to remind myself to take it. My then-boyfriend would shake the sheet of pink and yellow pills lovingly, saying “The pitter patter of tiny pills stops the pitter patter of tiny feet.” Sadly, the pill just wasn’t for me. A month in and I was crying at the drop of a hat, gagging at the taste of toothpaste, and had complications so unpleasant that one doctor was convinced I had every STI under the sun. I tried several different brands over the years but each brought with it an equally bizarre side effect. That being said, the pill works brilliantly for many women, and is by far the most painless of all the birth control methods. Don’t be afraid to talk to your doctor if you’d like to try a different type of pill, or are concerned about some of its side effects. And remember, if the pill doesn’t work for you, there’s always other options… Depo Provera If you’re worried about remembering to take a pill everyday, depo provera can be a great option. Like the pill, depo provera is a hormonal contraceptive, but instead of taking a little everyday, you get the whole lot in one go — injected into your booty once every three months. Most women who get depo also find that their periods become much less regular, or stop completely, so if you’ve had it up to here with Aunty Flo, depo could be just the ticket. On the flip side, you don’t get the monthly reminder from your uterus that it’s still baby free, so if you’re like me and worry that you’re pregnant if you feel a little queasy one morning, then it may not be your best bet. Implant with Salient’s former-sex columnist, Lux Lisbon I was unsure about the Jadelle implant because I had friends who were in both camps—those who hated it and those who swore by it. I had spent five years getting the depo provera injection which had worked a treat for me, but after five years you are at a much higher risk of developing osteoporosis so my doctor advised me to try something new. The implant is a similar hormone makeup to the injection so I figured my body wouldn’t mind it too much. I had tried the pill but my lifestyle lacks routine and I was always forgetting to take it and I needed something reliable. I had it fitted at the Family Planning Clinic and the only expense was the cost of the anaesthetic (less than $50). You are given an injection on the inside of your arm near your bicep to numb your skin, and then a small incision is made and two sticks about the size of a matchstick are inserted underneath the surface of your skin. I didn’t feel a thing but experienced a bit of a dull ache in my arm for the remainder of the day.The two little rods kind of feel like fish bones under the surface of your skin, which can make for a fun party trick and people tend to find it quite fascinating. I hoped I would stop getting my period after having the Jadelle implant, which was the case when I received the depo provera injection, but I was not so lucky. It has taken about 18 months for my period to become regular, if this worries you there is an option to take hormonal birth control pills simultaneously to regulate your cycle. The implant lasts for five years, and then I will have to have it removed from my arm, which I don’t imagine will be much fun but if it’s the price I am paying for sex without babies, I’m all for it. Intra-Uterine Device (IUD) When we first learned about the birds and the bees in high school, the IUD, which resembles a tiny grappling hook—like the ones Batman uses to swing around Gotham City—was the one form of contraception I swore I would never use. Ten years later, and I’m the proud owner of a copper IUD, which is nestled in my uterus and doing a fantastic job keeping it baby-free as we speak. The main benefits of the IUD are that it’s non-hormonal (although there’s a hormonal version, too) and it lasts for five years—once it’s in you don’t have to think about it again for a very long time. The caveat there, of course, being once it’s in. Because the IUD works its mysterious magic from within your uterus, it needs to be inserted through your cervix in order to get there in the first place. In the lead-up to my appointment, this was an absolutely terrifying prospect, and I certainly do not recommend Googling just how small your cervix is prior to getting you IUD in. That being said, perhaps it was just how much I’d over-thought it beforehand, or maybe just the bevvy of painkillers I’d taken, but getting my IUD in really was a walk in the park (if you were to take such a walk on a day when you were suffering from moderate-to-bad period cramps). The procedure involves having your cervix clamped open (a weird, but not unbearable, pinching sensation) and then various implements being inserted and removed (akin to bad, but not horrendous, period pain). It was all over faster than I could say “Overshare”, and it made for a great excuse to spend the rest of the day watching rom-coms and compulsively eating Cadbury Creme Eggs.

    • Inspiring student leadership at Victoria
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • An inaugural conference on leadership, organised by students for students, was held with a capacity turnout at Victoria University on Saturday. 

    • School Trustees Association AGM and Conference
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Rainey Collins lawyers
      • Partner Alan Knowsley attended the Association’s annual conference and AGM in Auckland recently. There were around 900 trustees and principals there from schools through out the country. The conference was addressed by both the Minister of Education, The Honourable Hekia Parata, and the Secretary of Education, Peter Hughes, as well as other key note speakers from New Zealand and the USA. Multiple workshops on all aspects of Board of Trustees responsibilities were held over the 3 days ranging from how to prevent and deal with bullying, to how to conduct the principal’s performance review. Great seminars with lots of participation from the attendees. A very inspiring conference and lots of learning to take away.

    • An Evening with American suspense/crime writer Karin Slaughter
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • It is with much pleasure that Wellington City Libraries will be hosting an evening with popular American suspense/crime writer Karin Slaughter on Tuesday 12th August 2014 at 6.00pm on the ground floor, Central Library, 65 Victoria Street. Prolific writer Karin Slaughter’s first novel Blindsighted, published in 2001 became an instant bestseller that sold more than 30 million copies world wide and was translated into 32 languages. This novel set the scene and characters for five other novels in a series titled the Grant County. In 2006 she published Triptych followed by two other novels that formed the Will Trent/Atlanta series. Unseen, published 2013 was the fifth novel in her Georgia series. Karin Slaughter’s most recent novel, the thrilling murder mystery titled Cop Town is also set in Atlanta, where she resides. We are especially pleased to welcome Karin as not only is she such a thrilling writer but she is also a strong advocate for libraries.  We invite you to join us and the many readers who enjoy her work at our evening in the Central Library on the 12th August. Karin will be in conversation about her work and will be available for questions. This is a free event, and her novels will be available for purchase and signing.

    • Māwhai Tuhituhi online Te Reo writing competition for Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori
      • 21 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Hei whakanui i Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2014, kei te mahi pakiwaitara tuhituhi ā-ipurangi Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, ā, ka taea e koe e tō kura rānei ētahi taonga te wini. Kua oti kē i te kaituhi rongonui haere nei a Paora Tibble te whiti tuatahi te tuhituhi, ā, māu e āpiti atu ō tuhituhi ki te pakiwaitara ia rā, hei te 21-25 o Hūrae. Ka whiriwhirihia kotahi te whiti ia rā (tae atu ki te 200 kupu), mai i ia reanga, ka mutu hoki ngā pakiwaitara hei te ahiahi o te Paraire te 25 o Hūrae. Ko ngā Reanga: (Kura) Tau 1-8, me te Tau 9-13 Ko ngā taonga ia rā he pēke whare pukapuka, he kāri koha, he haki pukapuka hoki. Ko ngā taonga mā ngā toa tuhituhi kotahi iPapa mō ia reanga, ā, he haki e $250 hei hoko pukapuka mō ngā kura o ngā toa tuhituhi. Ko te kura hoki he tokomaha rawa ana kaituhi ka wini hoki i te haki pukapuka e $250! Kia whai wāhi koe ki te wini, tūhono mai ā-ipurangi ka tuhituhi mai rā: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi   To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2014, Wellington City Libraries are weaving an online story, with the chance for you and your school to win some cool prizes. Well-known author, Paora Tibble, has written the first paragraph but we need you to continue the story each day, from 21-25 July. A paragraph (up to 200 words) will be selected, daily, from each age group, and the stories will finish on Friday afternoon, 25 July. Age Groups are: (School) Year 1-8, and Year 9-13 Daily prizes include library bags, concession cards and book vouchers. The prizes for overall winners include an iPad for each age group winner, plus $250 of book vouchers for the winners’ schools. The school with the most contributors will also win $250 of book vouchers! For your chance to win, join us online and weave your story: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi  

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