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    • Android Devices Meeting, Tuesday - 16 September 2014 - 10.00 am – 12.00 pm
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • SeniorNet Wellington Inc
      • When: Tuesday 16 September  2014, 10.00 am – 12.00 pm Where: Anvil House, Level 1, Room 2 What: Q & A format. Facilitators: Lindsay Rollo & Lionel Clover Are you having problems with your Android device or just interested in learning more about it?  If so, you are welcome to come along & ask your questions. Don't be shy. These sessions are specifically designed to help the beginner. Come and ask your questions so that we can help you get the most out of your phone or tablet.  No questions, no worries -  still please come along as you may have the answer to another’s question. These sessions are free for members. No registration is required.

    • Part 3: A Just Words Response – By Justin Blass
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Capital Mosaic, Wellington
      • I am currently living with the question: how can I, a self centered person, learn to care more for others. How can a self-centered person learn to care for others – Part 3 Part 1 | Part 2 I bring these ears to the current Capital Mosaic series called Just Words. In which we have […]

    • Winner of the 2014 Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Fiction announced
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Liam McIlvanney has won the Ngaio Marsh award for his novel titled Where the Dead Men Go. This is his second published novel, following All the Colours of the Town, published in 2009.  Professor McIlvanney holds the Stuart Chair in Scottish Studies, and is the Director of Otago University’s Scottish Programme. The book’s summary reads: “After three years in the wilderness, hardboiled reporter Gerry Conway is back at his desk at the Glasgow Tribune. But three years is a long time on newspapers and things have changed – readers are dwindling, budgets are tightening, and the Trib’s once rigorous standards are slipping. Once the paper’s star reporter, Conway now plays second fiddle to his former protégé, crime reporter Martin Moir. But when Moir goes AWOL as a big story breaks, Conway is dispatched to cover a gangland shooting. And when Moir’s body turns up in a flooded quarry, Conway is drawn deeper into the city’s criminal underworld as he looks for the truth about his colleague’s death. Braving the hostility of gangsters, ambitious politicians and his own newspaper bosses, Conway discovers he still has what it takes to break a big story. But this is a story not everyone wants to hear as the city prepares to host the Commonwealth Games and the country gears up for a make-or-break referendum on independence. In this, the second book in the Conway Trilogy, McIlvanney explores the murky interface of crime and politics in the new Scotland.” (Syndetics summary)  

    • A very reuseable view – Muir and Moodie’s Whanganui River postcards
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • A special part of Te Papa’s new rehang of Framing the View (part of Nga Toi Arts Te Papa on level 5 of the museum) is a photography feature on the Whanganui River’s ‘Drop Scene’. Here I want to share the journey of one image of the river taken by Dunedin photography studio, and postcard publishers, Muir &... Read more »

    • Smart City New Zealand: Digitally Connecting Communities with Neighbourly
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • One of the aims of creating a Smart City is to digitally connect its residents to each other so that they can communicate seamlessly across neighbourhoods, suburbs, and the city proper. Neighbourly is a New Zealand home grown application that was launched late last year and is growing rapidly. It’s a great free service that is address validated to increase security and trust. Neighbourly Website In the Wellington City area there are already well over two thousand residents signed up and interacting. The website is similar to a Facebook style, without the constant barrage of advertising and other nonsense that goes with it. Residents need to be address verified, which involves Neighbourly send letters with a unique code in a similar way to how Trade Me does. Once address verified you can access a lot more on the site and it’s structured to be community friendly. Their are community noticeboards, a Crime & Safety section, buy, sell, exchange, free stuff, lost & found, recommendations, rent, hire, borrow, community events, and community groups. You can message your neighbours securely and maps show which neighbours are part of the community. Content can be configured to just show your neighbourhood or all the surrounding neighbourhoods. Only address verified neighbours can see aspects of your profile and you can choose to display as little or as much as you want too including contact details. Those who are community minded can apply to be their suburb “Leads”, which allows them to moderate discussion, edit the Suburb’s details, and be a point of contact for people who need help. The entire site encourages people to interact in a digitally connected way, internationally these kind of sites have ultimately driven much larger resident interaction with local government. In some cases that is seen as a threat, having a community site that can rally several hundred people at once on local issues can be concerning for dinosaurs in local council. I’ve spoken to a couple of the Councillors in Wellington about what they think, which is generally supportive. They think that anything that is going to raise community interaction with each other and the Council to be a good thing. There are still some luddites in the woodwork who see Neighbourly and other similar initiatives (Loomio) as off limits because they are too “commercial” or for other dinosaur reasons. The reality is that Neighbourly is growing at a good rate of knots and from a cynic such as myself, I think it is quite valuable. There is no doubt that at some point the advertisements will appear, and talking to the creator’s this is likely to happen just to keep the service alive. In other words, the creators aren’t in this to become millionaires, they are doing it because they see a gap, support Smart City thinking, and just love the buzz of it. The reality is that the website is not run by the Council, it’s run by the community, and it supports another way of messaging entire suburbs about what is going on in the city. So council officers who are opposed, in my opinion, should be relegated to rubber stamping paperwork and managing archaic processes, because they are just standing in the way of progress. Rotorua District Council has been brave and signed a partnership with Neighbourly. They believe that the service supports their long-term vision and strategy; “by promoting community engagement on Neighbourly alongside other initiatives to improve communication among Rotorua residents, neighbourhoods and wider communities.” Rotorua Mayor Steve Chadwick says the site “provides an excellent platform for the Council to support its Rotorua 2030 vision, in particular its focus on resilient communities. “Our goal of inclusive, liveable and safe neighbourhoods will be further supported by our use of Neighbourly,” she says. “As a social media platform we believe it will give our community the confidence to be more involved and form stronger connections with one another, in turn helping us achieve our community’s vision for the future.” – Source Neighbourly is the first service that we’ve seen in New Zealand that looks at creating those digital communities. While there is a lot more work to be done, it’s a fantastic start. Council’s for example need to consider how they can promote free Internet Access within communities so that where there is a lower socio-economic group, they too can participate. In the meantime, sign up, get verified, and start communicating with your neighbours.

    • Bzzt Bzzt … Pop! Is that Strathmore Park? Bring me the soap.
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • The lights are back on here. No need to panic regular readers, we won’t be quite the peculiar and frustrated creature we were before. In the next couple of weeks we’ll be opening Strathmore Park to a range of bloggers, application shortly to appear, with a set of principles and guidelines so that we don’t fall into the gutter politics of certain other bloggers in the city, and beyond. This blog has always been about transparency. We aim to clean our act up and get on with that business. We have always tried to be non-partisan, and we’ll be continuing that tradition. For old time’s sake. We did consider joining the Online Media Standards Authority but after brief investigation found that spending $9,000 to sign up to a faux authority dominated by international media and requiring paper forms to apply didn’t really seem right. I figure we can regulate ourselves quite happily. Stay tuned Wellington and prepare to contribute.    

    • Scots College Tennis Coaching Programmes
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Scots College
      • Rutherford Tennis is again offering before school tennis programmes during Term 4 2014.   These programmes will provide players with the opportunity to improve their game at a convenient location.  These sessions will involve high intensity drills that simulate singles and doubles match-play. Dates 14 October - 4 December 2014 Location Foundation Courts Scots College Days Tuesday - Years 5 & 6 Wednesday - Years 7 & 8 Thursday - Years 9 & 10 read more

    • Android Devices Meeting, Tuesday - 16 September 2014 - 10.00 am – 12.00 pm
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • SeniorNet Wellington Inc
      • When: Tuesday 16 September  2014, 10.00 am – 12.00 pm Where: Anvil House, Level 1, Room 2 What: Q & A format. Facilitators: Lindsay Rollo & Lionel Clover Are you having problems with your Android device or just interested in learning more about it?  If so, you are welcome to come along & ask your questions. Don't be shy. These sessions are specifically designed to help the beginner. Come and ask your questions so that we can help you get the most out of your phone or tablet.  No questions, no worries -  still please come along as you may have the answer to another’s question. These sessions are free for members. No registration is required.

    • Part 3: A Just Words Response – By Justin Blass
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Capital Mosaic, Wellington
      • I am currently living with the question: how can I, a self centered person, learn to care more for others. How can a self-centered person learn to care for others – Part 3 Part 1 | Part 2 I bring these ears to the current Capital Mosaic series called Just Words. In which we have […]

    • Winner of the 2014 Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Fiction announced
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Liam McIlvanney has won the Ngaio Marsh award for his novel titled Where the Dead Men Go. This is his second published novel, following All the Colours of the Town, published in 2009.  Professor McIlvanney holds the Stuart Chair in Scottish Studies, and is the Director of Otago University’s Scottish Programme. The book’s summary reads: “After three years in the wilderness, hardboiled reporter Gerry Conway is back at his desk at the Glasgow Tribune. But three years is a long time on newspapers and things have changed – readers are dwindling, budgets are tightening, and the Trib’s once rigorous standards are slipping. Once the paper’s star reporter, Conway now plays second fiddle to his former protégé, crime reporter Martin Moir. But when Moir goes AWOL as a big story breaks, Conway is dispatched to cover a gangland shooting. And when Moir’s body turns up in a flooded quarry, Conway is drawn deeper into the city’s criminal underworld as he looks for the truth about his colleague’s death. Braving the hostility of gangsters, ambitious politicians and his own newspaper bosses, Conway discovers he still has what it takes to break a big story. But this is a story not everyone wants to hear as the city prepares to host the Commonwealth Games and the country gears up for a make-or-break referendum on independence. In this, the second book in the Conway Trilogy, McIlvanney explores the murky interface of crime and politics in the new Scotland.” (Syndetics summary)  

    • A very reuseable view – Muir and Moodie’s Whanganui River postcards
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • A special part of Te Papa’s new rehang of Framing the View (part of Nga Toi Arts Te Papa on level 5 of the museum) is a photography feature on the Whanganui River’s ‘Drop Scene’. Here I want to share the journey of one image of the river taken by Dunedin photography studio, and postcard publishers, Muir &... Read more »

    • Smart City New Zealand: Digitally Connecting Communities with Neighbourly
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • One of the aims of creating a Smart City is to digitally connect its residents to each other so that they can communicate seamlessly across neighbourhoods, suburbs, and the city proper. Neighbourly is a New Zealand home grown application that was launched late last year and is growing rapidly. It’s a great free service that is address validated to increase security and trust. Neighbourly Website In the Wellington City area there are already well over two thousand residents signed up and interacting. The website is similar to a Facebook style, without the constant barrage of advertising and other nonsense that goes with it. Residents need to be address verified, which involves Neighbourly send letters with a unique code in a similar way to how Trade Me does. Once address verified you can access a lot more on the site and it’s structured to be community friendly. Their are community noticeboards, a Crime & Safety section, buy, sell, exchange, free stuff, lost & found, recommendations, rent, hire, borrow, community events, and community groups. You can message your neighbours securely and maps show which neighbours are part of the community. Content can be configured to just show your neighbourhood or all the surrounding neighbourhoods. Only address verified neighbours can see aspects of your profile and you can choose to display as little or as much as you want too including contact details. Those who are community minded can apply to be their suburb “Leads”, which allows them to moderate discussion, edit the Suburb’s details, and be a point of contact for people who need help. The entire site encourages people to interact in a digitally connected way, internationally these kind of sites have ultimately driven much larger resident interaction with local government. In some cases that is seen as a threat, having a community site that can rally several hundred people at once on local issues can be concerning for dinosaurs in local council. I’ve spoken to a couple of the Councillors in Wellington about what they think, which is generally supportive. They think that anything that is going to raise community interaction with each other and the Council to be a good thing. There are still some luddites in the woodwork who see Neighbourly and other similar initiatives (Loomio) as off limits because they are too “commercial” or for other dinosaur reasons. The reality is that Neighbourly is growing at a good rate of knots and from a cynic such as myself, I think it is quite valuable. There is no doubt that at some point the advertisements will appear, and talking to the creator’s this is likely to happen just to keep the service alive. In other words, the creators aren’t in this to become millionaires, they are doing it because they see a gap, support Smart City thinking, and just love the buzz of it. The reality is that the website is not run by the Council, it’s run by the community, and it supports another way of messaging entire suburbs about what is going on in the city. So council officers who are opposed, in my opinion, should be relegated to rubber stamping paperwork and managing archaic processes, because they are just standing in the way of progress. Rotorua District Council has been brave and signed a partnership with Neighbourly. They believe that the service supports their long-term vision and strategy; “by promoting community engagement on Neighbourly alongside other initiatives to improve communication among Rotorua residents, neighbourhoods and wider communities.” Rotorua Mayor Steve Chadwick says the site “provides an excellent platform for the Council to support its Rotorua 2030 vision, in particular its focus on resilient communities. “Our goal of inclusive, liveable and safe neighbourhoods will be further supported by our use of Neighbourly,” she says. “As a social media platform we believe it will give our community the confidence to be more involved and form stronger connections with one another, in turn helping us achieve our community’s vision for the future.” – Source Neighbourly is the first service that we’ve seen in New Zealand that looks at creating those digital communities. While there is a lot more work to be done, it’s a fantastic start. Council’s for example need to consider how they can promote free Internet Access within communities so that where there is a lower socio-economic group, they too can participate. In the meantime, sign up, get verified, and start communicating with your neighbours.

    • Bzzt Bzzt … Pop! Is that Strathmore Park? Bring me the soap.
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • The lights are back on here. No need to panic regular readers, we won’t be quite the peculiar and frustrated creature we were before. In the next couple of weeks we’ll be opening Strathmore Park to a range of bloggers, application shortly to appear, with a set of principles and guidelines so that we don’t fall into the gutter politics of certain other bloggers in the city, and beyond. This blog has always been about transparency. We aim to clean our act up and get on with that business. We have always tried to be non-partisan, and we’ll be continuing that tradition. For old time’s sake. We did consider joining the Online Media Standards Authority but after brief investigation found that spending $9,000 to sign up to a faux authority dominated by international media and requiring paper forms to apply didn’t really seem right. I figure we can regulate ourselves quite happily. Stay tuned Wellington and prepare to contribute.    

    • Scots College Tennis Coaching Programmes
      • 1 Sep 2014
      • Scots College
      • Rutherford Tennis is again offering before school tennis programmes during Term 4 2014.   These programmes will provide players with the opportunity to improve their game at a convenient location.  These sessions will involve high intensity drills that simulate singles and doubles match-play. Dates 14 October - 4 December 2014 Location Foundation Courts Scots College Days Tuesday - Years 5 & 6 Wednesday - Years 7 & 8 Thursday - Years 9 & 10 read more

    • NZ's Bloggergate - Boil Up on Beached Whales
      • 31 Aug 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      •  STINKING DROPPINGS LEAVE CLUES ON CULTURE With the extraordinary developments surrounding rendering down of facts and opinions on behalf of the NZ National Party by ‘blogger’ Cameron Slater in his scraps, scrapings and spin ‘Whale Oil Beef Hooked’ website, we may have entered an era where we need to examine what these melt-downs mean for our culture – and indeed reflect more deeply on such blogs as artefacts. See: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11317077 The great German Human Geographer Friedrich Ratzel in his epic compendium ‘The History of Mankind’ (1896) was of the view that: ‘For the study of earlier stages of social life, and even of morals and religion, with their manifold bearing on the practical problems of modern life, there is no more useful preparation than familiarity with the modes in which material art and representation are developed and propagated. ‘The same underlying human instinct, the same constancy of human faculty through low and high stages, the same pliability of life to the needs of outward circumstances, which precedes the cultured state where circumstances have to yield to the needs of man, the same adaptation of artificial means suggested by nature, the same copying by the whole tribe of the devices which individuals have started, and then their wider diffusion by one tribe copying from another - these actions go on throughout the human race, and the principles we learn from mere things may guide us in the study of men’. More to the point, when discussing the Maori, Friedrich Ratzel noted the long-standing avidity with which some New Zealanders have sucked up whale oil. Indeed he quoted from quoted a passage from James Cook’s journal in which Jim describes boiling down a small whale that had been caught by his crew: "No Greenlander was ever so sharp set upon train-oil [whale oil] as our friends here; they greedily swallowed the stinking droppings."  As for the smell, we can draw on no better commentator than Herman Melville in Moby Dick: "All ready there? Off hatch, then, and start her. You cook, fire the works." This was an easy thing, for the carpenter had been thrusting his shavings into the furnace throughout the passage. Here be it said that in a whaling voyage the first fire in the try-works has to be fed for a time with wood. After that no wood is used, except as a means of quick ignition to the staple fuel. ‘In a word, after being tried out, the crisp, shrivelled blubber, now called scraps or fritters, still contains considerable of its unctuous properties. These fritters feed the flames. Like a plethoric burning martyr, or a self-consuming misanthrope, once ignited, the whale supplies his own fuel and burns by his own body. ‘Would that he consumed his own smoke! for his smoke is horrible to inhale, and inhale it you must, and not only that, but you must live in it for the time. It has an unspeakable, wild, Hindoo odor about it, such as may lurk in the vicinity of funereal pyres. It smells like the left wing of the day of judgment; it is an argument for the pit’. So it seems that we have revitalized a preoccupation that has a long history that has been by applying a new medium. The tri-pot has been superseded by the try-pot but the new forms have evolved in concert with circumstances and their environment.  The difference though is that whereas whaling was the perquisite of a hardy few, blogging like that of Mr Slater has exposed to the world the pliability of public life in New Zealand and the way in which moral circumstances yield to its 'Who-You-Know-ocracy at work on Mate’s Rates Capitalism in a Delusion of Cosy Intimacy' [i.e. the NZ Establishment]. TRIMMING THE LAMPS FOR THE UNWISE In the UK Owen Jones has just published a book: ‘The Establishment: And How They Get Away with It’ and provided us with a synopsis in The Guardian: ‘The Establishment uncovered: how power works in Britain’ [See: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/26/the-establishment-uncovered-how-power-works-in-britain-elites-stranglehold] As Jones has it: ‘Here is what I understand the establishment to mean. Today's establishment is made up – as it has always been – of powerful groups that need to protect their position in a democracy in which almost the entire adult population has the right to vote. The establishment represents an attempt on behalf of these groups to "manage" democracy, to make sure that it does not threaten their own interests. ‘In this respect, it might be seen as a firewall that insulates them from the wider population. As the well-connected rightwing blogger and columnist Paul Staines puts it approvingly: "We've had nearly a century of universal suffrage now, and what happens is capital finds ways to protect itself from, you know, the voters." Owen Jones goes on to observe that Lord Salisbury told parliament in 1866, in response to plans to extend the suffrage, that giving working-class people the vote would tempt them to pass "laws with respect to taxation and property especially favourable to them, and therefore dangerous to all other classes". Although two World Wars made it politically untenable to deny conscript combatants and their families improvements in welfare, based to some extent on higher taxes and the regulation of private business, the moral imperatives and exigencies of greater equity have worn thin in the modern world, such that ‘today, many of those constraints have been removed or are in the process of being dismantled – and now the establishment is characterised by institutions and ideas that legitimise and protect the concentration of wealth and power in very few hands’. Looking at what constitutes the Big E, Owen has this to say: ‘The interests of those who dominate British society are disparate; indeed, they often conflict with one another. The establishment includes politicians who make laws; media barons who set the terms of debate; businesses and financiers who run the economy; police forces that enforce a law that is rigged in favour of the powerful. ‘The establishment is where these interests and worlds intersect, either consciously or unconsciously. It is unified by a common mentality, which holds that those at the top deserve their power and their ever-growing fortunes, and which might be summed up by the advertising slogan "Because I'm worth it". ‘This is the mentality that has driven politicians to pilfer expenses, businesses to avoid tax, and City bankers to demand ever greater bonuses while plunging the world into economic disaster. All of these things are facilitated – even encouraged – by laws that are geared to cracking down on the smallest of misdemeanours committed by those at the bottom of the pecking order – for example, benefit fraud. "One rule for us, one rule for everybody else" might be another way to sum up establishment thinking’. While Jones puts the blame pretty squarely on neoliberal economic policies, I think that there are other significant factors at play including: The increasing availability of soporifics [such as celebrity bedazzlement, junk food, junk media, technical obfuscation and content overload] that can be administered to the population at large. [As Aldous Huxley famously commented ‘... the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging and kicking them into obedience’]  A continued decline in personal and public morality whereby freedom of verbal expression is regarded as freedom of verbal oppression and, as NZ Political Columnist Tracey Watkins has observed, there is ‘an increasingly 24/7 news and comment milieu where blogging, texting and tweeting is becoming incessant; and the growing tendency towards political ‘smears’ whereby innuendo and false attribution can be used to push politicians off the news boards at vital moments and carefully sown rumours can cast doubts and reinforce prejudices’. And as I have already commented: ‘that such approaches can succeed is a tribute to the Einstellung or Confirmation Effect [the persistent tendency of people to seek evidence that confirms their ideas and to ignore anything that contradicts them] and Thinking Aversion [the persistent tendency for most people to avoid serious thinking and the concentration, loneliness and commitment that it requires]'.All this is particularly dangerous in the case of New Zealand. In a small country like New Zealand, the Establishment has accentuated leverage in gaining ruling monopolies over expression and the creation and distribution of wealth. The dangers associated with Crony Capitalism have long been known to become exacerbated by an absence of scale. Secondly, I would argue that the Non-Establishment masses outside New Zealand’s ‘Who-You-Know-ocracy at work on Mate’s Rates Capitalism in a Delusion of Cosy Intimacy’ are so decent that they are baby seals to the Orcas. There is a long tradition among ordinary people in NZ of wanting to be left alone and of not having to bother with blowhards, dick heads and tall poppies – especially those of a political persuasion. Admirable as this may have been in the past, it is easily translated by Spin Doctors into Confirmation and Thinking Aversion. What we have seen above all in the unfolding dramas associated with Cameron Slater and his cronies and Nicky Hager and Kim Dotcom and their cronies, is a small and vulnerable society at great risk. And we have also had laid out before us in plain sight the many ways in which the Establishment and its National Party Government flagship collaborate and collude to restrain and diminish democracy. I have always regarded New Zealand’s topping of the Transparency International league as a joke – on the grounds that in a small society like ours it is almost impossible to distinguish partiality from corruption. Now though we have some firm evidence, with the Minister of Justice claiming as an intimate friend a blogger who appears to have had the temerity to threaten the Serious Fraud Office. If this has ‘an unspeakable, wild, Hindoo odor about it, such as may lurk in the vicinity of funereal pyres, given that ‘it smells like the left wing of the day of judgment’, this should occasion no great surprise. As for Friedrich Ratzel, I feel sure that he would have some direct observations on the ways in which 'copying by the whole tribe of the devices which individuals have started, and then their wider diffusion’ bears upon ‘the practical problems of modern life’ in New Zealand and the future of our society and its morality.  

    • Results – Sunday 31st August 2014
      • 31 Aug 2014
      • Waikanae Golf Club
      • “With glorious winter sunshine greeting the competitors for the final qualifying round of the Club Champs which this year for the first time was linked to the 54 Hole Strokeplay Champs, scoring was expected to be low, but maybe it was the pressure of the competitions alongside the Shootout round 2 but there were no really outstanding scores, however this did not detract from the fierceness of competitive spirit that always accompanies this time of the season. In the Open Champs Ryan Kinealy has come out as top seed with a combined total of 156 gross, the Intermediate Champs has a number 1 seed in Greg Beale with a total of 171 gross. The Juniors have a much smaller field but heading that grade is Peter Burleigh on 186. The draws have been made and is now on the Locker Room wall with the 1st round booked for 28th Sept. The final round of all grades for the 54 Stroke Champs takes place next Sunday , the draw for which will be on the club website by Wednesday. Our thanks to EyeZac Painters and Decorators for their generous sponsorship of this the premier Strokeplay competition in our calendar. Lastly, by next weekend we will have the first show of the Shootout leader board. Always an exciting time for all, with the prize of a cherished place in the 19 strong field on Finals Day up for grabs. Our thanks once again to Peter Venner Motors for his super sponsorship of this most popular event. There are 33 in the field as I write but with the expectation that this will grow over the coming weeks.”  - Cliff Martin  

    • From War to Peace
      • 31 Aug 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • The image above is my favourite from a WWI album with photos by NZ soldier Herbert (Bert) Green. The group seems just perfectly composed. There is also the sense of it being two photographs somehow layered together, with another scene unfolding quite independently behind the soldiers. The way the hat of the man at right veers towards... Read more »

    • Kerry’s Fiction Picks
      • 30 Aug 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Song of the shank This story is based on the true story of ‘Blind Tom’, a 19th century piano prodigy who was blind, autistic and a slave.  He moved to a ‘black refugee city’ and became a performer.  What struck me about this book is the timeliness of it, following on from 12 Years a Slave and current events in America. The book is described as uncompromising with Publisher’s Weekly saying ” both the conception and the underlying history behind this story will leave readers with a profound understanding of the inhumanity of slavery and 19th century racial attitudes”.  Author Jeffrey Renard Allen spent years researching and writing it. Hour of lead This is another novel focusing on a part of American history, this time the mythology of the West.  It’s a family saga and a coming of age novel set  in early twentieth century Washington State.  About a young man Matt, who takes over the family ranch when his father dies.  When his wife rejects him Matt takes off across the state on a journey, falling in with the violent Jarms family.  Kirkus Reviews describes him as “He’s the quintessential Western hero—taciturn and strong as iron with an unbreachable moral center”.  Matt eventually returns home and his past starts to catch up with him, the story reaching a surprising and bleak conclusion. Chinese cooking for diamond thieves On a much lighter note – I read a description of this book as a mash-up between a cozy mystery and ‘emerging adult’ fiction.  I can’t even imagine what that means.  It’s about college dropout Tucker who meets Corinne and sets about trying to impress her. They run off together and end up working in a Chinese restaurant.  However, it soon becomes apparent that gangsters are after Corinne - looking for the diamonds she stole from them.  Publisher’s Weekly calls it a “caper story with foodie culture” and Booklist says it’s bound to please “any fiction reader interested in diamond heists, Chinese-speaking martial-arts masters, Chinese food, and wooing done well, with lame jokes and ex-girlfriends included”.

    • For Keira Knightly
      • 30 Aug 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      •  VENUS AMAZOS   Soft, soft deal gently with that good Knightly Small ware should stand and tip their milky way; Cup, cup the A’s stretched taut and tightly.   Though men know their ends grow perk and sprightly As the fabric reveals from overlay And breasting drenched grows aureoles slightly.   Venus Amazos, off the shoulder lightly Let loose your arrows on the streaking day Pierce deep with deft-fletched rose-tips flighty.   Wild girl who fought and quivered mightily Neglect the shirt and let admirers pay To show that torso decked so scantily.   Sad men, see now exposed so blindingly Mini-meteors touch the sky in play, Burning to heat the blood so lustily.   And you, my Hippolyta, boldly Bless me once more with chesty moles, I pray. Do not go clothed again my beauty Keep your top off pimple nipple Keira K. FOR MORE [AND I MEAN MORE] SEE: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/keira-knightley-topless-for-interview-magazine-usually-conservative-actress-does-own-take-on-freethenipple-campaign-9699912.html

    • Take 5 for Students: Pork Belly with Fig and Mandarins
      • 30 Aug 2014
      • Salient
      • Pork Belly with Fig and Mandarins Pork belly, (fig) jam, onions, mandarins, soy sauce. The pork belly slices I used for this dish were on special and not too fatty. You could substitute sausages or chicken pieces for the pork belly – but note that it won’t need to cook for so long. I made this dish with the last of a fig jam I had. You can use apricot, plum, marmalade or something similar. Slice 2 onions and put them in a base of a casserole dish, along with four mandarins, sliced with the skin on. Lay sliced pork belly on top. Swish a couple of tablespoons of jam in a cup of hot water, then pour it over the meat. Add ¼ cup light soy sauce and put the lid on top. Cook in the oven at 150°C (305°F) for 2-2 ½ hours, taking the lid off near the last half hour. Be sure that there is always some liquid in the dish, and top up with more water if necessary. When you take the lid off to finish cooking, it will allow the meat to brown a little. This may not need salt because of the soy, but pepper will be a good thing. Serve this yumminess on rice, then spoon some of the syrupy onion mixture and juice over as well. - Margôt de Cotesworth Take 5 and Cook: cooking fabulous food with just 5 ingredients. Read our blog for more free recipes: http://bit.ly/t5blog  

    • Newsletter - September 2014
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Wellington Beekeepers Association
      • The September 2014 issue of the newsletter is available for download below. As usual there are two versions: 1. Plain pages 2. Booklet format AttachmentSize WBA-Newsletter-2014-09-plain.pdf319.66 KB WBA-Newsletter-2014-09-booklet.pdf215.51 KB

    • German Samoa captured by New Zealand Troops – August 1914
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Te Papa's blog
      • Today marks the 100th anniversary of the occupation of Samoa by New Zealand troops. It was the first military action of New Zealanders in the first world war. This postcard titled ’German War Flag captured at Samoa by New Zealand Expeditionary Force’ is one of a small group of items at Te Papa that reference... Read more »

    • Recent Science Book Picks – August 2014
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Here are a few of the new science books that have crept their way across my desk over the last month. Topics span mathematics, animal behaviours, the fish in the Wellington harbour, and more! This is improbable too : synchronized cows, speedy brain extractors, and more WTF research / Marc Abrahams. Marc Abrahams, the founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, offers an addictive, wryly funny expose of the oddest, most imaginative, and just plain improbable research from around the globe. (Syndetics summary) The cartoon introduction to statistics / by Grady Klein and Alan Dabney, Ph. D. “If one is looking for a nonthreatening introduction to the basic concepts of statistics, then this cartoon guide will serve admirably. Klein (cartoonist) and Dabney (Texas A&M) lead readers carefully through the ideas of graphical appearances, averages and spread, the central limit theorem, and inference with short descriptive captions, while the accompanying cartoons provide lighthearted background illustrations supporting the principles at hand. It is certainly fun seeing data gathering tied to truckloads of random rhinos, confidence intervals related to expressions of hatred between aliens on two neighboring planets, and hypothesis testing tied to the speed comparisons of spotted and striped flying pigs. However, accuracy is never sacrificed. In general, the book first illustrates each statistical concept by a humor-injected example, but ultimately brings the traditional vocabulary into play so that integrity is maintained.” (Adapted from CHOICE) Atlas of the southern night sky [cartographic material] / Steve Massey, Steve Quirk. If you ever needed a book to help you explore the wonderful night skies from down under, be it Australia, South America, South Africa or New Zealand, this is it! With hundreds of full colour star charts and maps of the Moon and planets of our Solar System, this book will ensure you get the most out of a pair of binoculars or a small telescope from suburban and dark country sky locations. Includes many new and updated images and objects to find in the night sky, several new images by southern amateur astronomers, updated star charts, updated planetary information, extended equipment and image processing information and an all-new Deep-Sky month planner. (Syndetics summary) Origins of mathematical words : a comprehensive dictionary of Latin, Greek, and Arabic roots / Anthony Lo Bello. “This fascinating work by Lo Bello (mathematics, Allegheny College) is an etymological dictionary of popular mathematical terms of Latin, Greek, and Arabic origin. The language of mathematics is an important instructional component in elementary and secondary schools, and in colleges and universities. Scholars have claimed that students may have difficulty reading, understanding, and discussing mathematical ideas if they are not familiar with the words used in mathematics. When students do not know the meaning of mathematical terms such as “perpendicular,” “derivative,” and “asymptote,” they have difficulties grasping the deeper structures of mathematical concepts. Teaching the origins of mathematical words helps bridge the gap between everyday language and mathematical language.” (Adapted from CHOICE) Art and architecture of insects / David M. Phillips. “Former virologist Phillips collects dynamic, creepy, and starkly beautiful electron micrographs of insects to bring out the gorgeous, detailed structures imperceptible to the naked eye. Phillips’s love of both entomology and photography comes through clearly in what he describes as a retirement project after ending his career as a biomedical researcher at New York City’s Population Council, and though the text rambles from topic to topic without obvious breaks, the material is still clear, informative, and surprisingly entertaining. Though most of the black and white photos are of entire insect bodies, chapters are divided by body part-eyes, antennae, wings, etc.-and focus largely on functional anatomy, detailing how body structures make each insect well-suited for its ecological role and biological needs.” (Adapted from Publisher Weekly) The secret language of animals : a guide to remarkable behavior / Janine M. Benyus ; illustrations by Juan Carlos Barberis ; foreword by Alexandra Horowitz. “Humans have always pondered what makes us different from animals. After all, many species exhibit behaviors that resemble our own (or is it the other way around?). This informative volume covers 20 of the world’s most well-known animals, including African elephants, flamingos, giant pandas, Nile crocodiles, and polar bears. Divided by geographical regions (African Jungles, Plains, and Waterways ; Asian Forests ; Warm Oceans ; North America ; and The Poles), the chapters cover some of the basic habits and behaviors of a particular animal, such as elimination, self-grooming, and sleeping. Social behaviors, from friendly to threatening, are discussed, as are sexual and parental interactions. Numerous sidebars showcase vital stats on each animal, quirky facts, and trivia. Each chapter ends with a list of behaviors for readers to look for at the zoo or in the wild.” (Adapted from Booklist) Wellington down under / Stephen Journée ; edited by Lorraine Olphert. Stephen Journee, a skilled diver and photographer, gives a rare insight into the world below and brings to life all the fish varieties and other forms of marine life that have made the Wellington harbour and the surrounding coastal bays their home over the centuries. From the unbelievable colour of the sea sponges, sea squirts, jewel anemones, blue and red moki, triplefins, seahorses and jellyfish, to schools of jack mackerels and spotties, to dolphins and the occasional visit by pods of orcas – all feature between these covers. Stephen also takes the reader on a tour of famous shipwrecks of the 19th and 20th centuries, a look back in time and what remains from past tragedies; wharves and slipways from yester-year. (Syndetics summary) The melting world : a journey across America’s vanishing glaciers / Christopher White. “Whenever global warming and rising sea levels are mentioned in the same breath, the presumed source of the extra water is usually the polar ice caps. Yet according to nature writer and frequent National Geographic contributor White, melting mountaintop snow and ice will have just as much of an impact on environmental decline as shrinking coastlines. In the late summer of 2008, White joined a team of government-funded ecologists, led by veteran earth scientist Dan Fagre, to chart the rapid disappearance of alpine ice in Montana’s Glacier National Park. Here White eloquently describes the scores of breathtaking views he enjoyed during his five seasons with Fagre, even as the team grappled with many disturbing findings. White’s account is both an urgent wake-up call to nations across the globe that share responsibility for climate change and a heartbreaking elegy to a vital component of Earth’s ecology that may soon be gone forever.” (Adapted from Booklist)

    • Keeping the faith: Religion recent arrivals
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Musings on the meaning or purpose of faith can be found in this month’s new books – encompassing philosophy, faith through a scientific lens, or an active faith on the streets of Sydney or US. The soul of the world, by Roger Scruton. Philosopher Roger Scruton defends the experience of the sacred against today’s fashionable forms of atheism. He argues that personal relationships, intuitions, beauty, and aesthetics in art or music hint at dimensions that cannot be understood solely through scientific eyes. This is not so much an argument for the existence of God, but a thoughtful musing that a quest for ‘the sacred’ is essential to humanity. Limitless sky : life lessons from the Himalayas, by David Charles Manners. The author was trekking in Nepal when he stumbled upon the mountain home of a jhankri, or Nepalese shaman. The jhankri accepted him as his pupil, and so began the next stage of David’s extraordinary journey. In this book, he shares the wisdom and insights he learnt from those transformational days in the Himalayas. Keeping the faith without a religion, by Roger Housden. Faith is not something received from a religion, nor must we abandon it in order to become rational. Housden asks the reader to keep faith not in God but in life. This does not exclude but also does not assume a God. Angels and saints : a biblical guide to friendship with God’s holy ones, by Scott Hahn. Are angels and saints different to ordinary people? Some art would have us believe that they are, very different. But what does the Bible say? Jesus has united heaven and earth closely and we are surrounded by a “great cloud of witnesses.” Their prayers rise to God, in the Book of Revelation, like the sweet aroma of incense. This book shares the stories of several saints and angels who are no strangers to real life, but are grounded and motivated by the spiritual life that every person is called by God to live. Blood moons rising : Bible prophecy, Israel, and the four blood moons, by Mark Hitchcock. In 2014 and 2015, there will be four blood moons falling during Jewish feasts – which has only happened before in 1493-94, 1949-50 and 1967-68 (significant dates in Jewish history). This discusses the prophetic significance of the moon darkening and appearing as blood. The library has also received Blood moons : decoding the imminent heavenly signs, by Mark Biltz which discusses the same phenomenon. The book of chakras & subtle bodies, by Stephen Sturgess. Learn about chakras, nadis, and kundalini with the in-depth section on Yoga philosophy, then follow Stephen’s variety of practices and techniques for removing any obstacles that may be standing in the way of uniting with your true nature. The book includes Hatha Yoga techniques using asanas, mudras, bandhas, pranayama, and kriya purification, as well as Raja and kriya Yoga techniques – mantras, concentration and meditation. (drawn from the publisher’s description) Culture and the death of God, by Terry Eagleton. Since the Enlightenment, religion has been undermined and replaced by various philosophies e.g. modernism, cultural forces and postmodernism. On the one hand, many people no longer feel a need to be redeemed, but interestingly this is accompanied by a renewal of religious fundamentalism across the world. Because, Eagleton points out, “religion provides … a degree of spiritual depth to otherwise shallow lives.” A nun on the bus : how all of us can create hope, change, and community, by Sister Simone Campbell, with David Gibson. “Campbell – activist, attorney, and nun – mixes autobiography with a strong call for justice in this brisk-paced, crisp, inspiring account. … Under her leadership, NETWORK advocated health care reform, work that garnered censure from the Vatican, which claimed that NETWORK was devoting too much time and energy to social justice. “Well, yes, social justice is what Catholic sisters do,” Campbell tartly writes. In order to advance the organization’s mission in the wake of this Vatican censure, Campbell and other nuns took a nine-state bus tour, highlighting the struggles of low- and middle-income people…” (Publisher Weekly) Love over hate : finding life by the wayside, by Graham Long. Long writes of his life journey – from social worker to postman, to pastor and CEO of The Wayside Chapel in Sydney’s King Cross. Love Over Hate explores the day-to-day life in Kings Cross. This community often judged for its problems, and the struggles faced by the homeless, those who’ve suffered abuse or battled alcoholism or drugs are not glossed over. But there are also encouraging examples of perseverance and fortitude, joy, and kindness. Why science does not disprove God, by Amir D. Aczel. Mathematician Aczel argues that Dawkins and his New Atheist allies have misrepresented scientific methods and findings of science e.g. proving God’s non-existence based on probability theory fails under robust scrutiny. He accuses them of over-simplifying complexities in metaphysical thinking. Aczel concludes with a realisation of the extent of fascinating mysteries, such as the stunning vistas of infinity. “Such mysteries may not signify the presence of the divine, but they will surely stir deep wonderings.” (Booklist)

    • New Books on Movies
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • The new books on movies & TV programmes this month offer alluring reading, including comprehensive biographies of two iconic heroines of all time: Greta Garbo and Marilyn Monroe, and The $11 billion year which tells behind-the-scenes stories of ever changing film industry. Enjoy! Greta Garbo : the mystery of style / edited by Stefania Ricci. The never-before-published wardrobe of a timeless star, for lovers of fashion, photography and film history. Greta Garbo’s influence over fashion has transcended time. Her dresses, suits, impeccably-tailored coats with a slightly masculine look and the indispensable accessories (shoes, bags, glasses, foulards) has created a style emulated, imitated, even occasionally reviled, but never fully examined. For the first time a catalogue of great glamour and a travelling exhibition detail this extraordinary wardrobe whose minimalism fits so well with current fashion trends. Edited by Stefania Ricci, the Director of Museo Salvatore Ferragamo in Florence, as the Divine Greta Garbo was a Ferragamo client from the 1920s until her death, and the founder of the Italian maison designed hundreds of original, classical, futuristic, hand-made shoes and sandals exclusively for her, most of them shown here for the first time. A stunning selection of black and white Garbo portraits by celebrated photographers completes the volume. (Syndetics summary) Marilyn Monroe : her films, her life / Michelle Vogel ; foreword by George Chakiris. “This book is essentially a filmography interlaced with a complex biographical account of Marilyn Monroe’s life and loves throughout her career. A lengthy introduction explains her traumatic early life and mysterious, unexpected, much talked about death. This is the definitive filmic-reference guide for the legendary Hollywood icon.” (Publisher’s description) Mickey Rourke / Keri Walsh. “Mickey Rourke has been many things to many people over the course of his 35 year career: a bright young star fresh from the Actors Studio, a Hollywood heart-throb, a professional boxer, a muse to young independent filmmakers, and a Comic-Con icon. In this lively study, Keri Walsh analyses his performances in key films – from Diner (1982), Rumble Fish (1983) and 9 ½ Weeks (1986) to Sin City (2005), The Wrestler (2008) and Iron Man II (2010) – and traces the development and multiple transformations of Rourke’s star image. Taking an in-depth look at his colourful career in its cultural and cinematic contexts, Walsh explores how this controversial, talented and undersung Hollywood star has intrigued audiences from the 1980s to the present day. (Adapted from amazon.com) You must remember this : life and style in Hollywood’s Golden Age / Robert J. Wagner with Scott Eyman. “A handsome young journeyman actor in the 1950s, Wagner observed what were to be the last years of the golden era of Hollywood. The studio system and the old-time moguls were beginning to fade but were still powerful. Stars still displayed their glamorous lifestyle in fashionable clubs and restaurants; gossip columnists like Louella Parsons, Jimmy Fidler, and Hedda Hopper feverishly sought their exclusives. Although Wagner sporadically inserts some of his own experiences in this account, it is not a memoir; rather it is more a social history of that era, divided according to broad topics such as the fabulous Hollywood homes, the nightlife, the memorable personalities, the columnists, and how the stars spent their leisure time. Introducing this is a general history of Hollywood before and during the height of that legendary era. Most of what Wagner and Eyman describe has been written about very often and sometimes in more interesting ways. But Wagner has had a decades-long career and has certainly been in the “thick” of the lifestyle he describes.” (Adapted from Library Journal) The $11 billion year : from Sundance to the Oscars, an inside look at the changing Hollywood system / Anne Thompson. “Showbiz journalist Thompson offers a thrilling behind-the-scenes look at a year in the business of film, 2012, which many deem a banner year for movies. Thompson reports from the big film festivals Sundance, South by Southwest, Telluride, and others to show how films premiere and gain word-of-mouth buzz from the critics and industry insiders in attendance. On the other end of the spectrum, she witnesses how the studios create blockbuster genre franchises, such as Twilight and The Avengers, by marketing directly to cinemagoers at San Diego Comic Con, which has grown into a massive industry convention that puts fans in the room with their favorite stars. It all leads up to a big finale at the Oscars, when critical acclaim and marketing dollars vie to anoint the best film and performances of the year. Mixing behind-the-scenes stories about the making of the most notable films of 2012 with keen observations about the changing nature of the business, Thompson has crafted a page-turning look at the moviemaking industry that is bound to appeal to film buffs.” (Adapted from Booklist) Film freak / Christopher Fowler. It’s the late 1970s and 20-something Christopher Fowler is a film freak, obsessively watching lousy films in run-down fleapit cinemas. He longs to be a famous screenwriter and put his dreams on the big screen. And so he heads for Wardour Street, Britain’s equivalent of Hollywood. But he’s made a spectacular mistake, arriving just as the nation’s filmmakers are falling to their knees, brought low by the arrival of video and the destruction of the old movie palaces. The only films being made are smutty low budget farces and TV spinoffs and instead of being asked to write another ‘Bullitt’, he’s churning out short films advertising boilers and nylon sheets. Somehow, against the odds, he finds success – although in a very different guise to the one he expected. (Syndetics summary) Singing on stage : an actors’ guide / Jane Streeton and Philip Raymond. “Singing on stage can be a daunting prospect for actors, particularly for those who have not sung before. Yet singing should be an essential part of every actor’s toolkit. Singing on Stage: An Actor’s Guide gives an insight for the first time into the vocal techniques and practical approaches that have been developed over generations as an integral part of the training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Jane Streeton and Philip Raymond are highly experienced performers and teachers; their book encourages each actor to explore their own authentic voice as opposed to offering a ‘one-size-fits-all’ or ‘quick-fix’ approach. Featuring inspirational listening suggestions and the observations of successful performers and practitioners, Singing on Stage: An Actor’s Guide is the must-have companion for complete beginners as well as for experienced actors who wish to develop their understanding of singing on stage. (Adapted from amazon.com) Five came back : a story of Hollywood and the Second World War / Mark Harris. Five Came Back tells the untold story of how Hollywood changed World War II, and how World War II changed Hollywood…Before the Second World War the Hollywood box office was booming. But government investigations into allegations of corruption and racketeering were rife. A feeling hung in the air that the business was too foreign, too Jewish, too ‘un-American’ in its values and causes. Then the war changed everything. With Pearl Harbor came the opportunity for Hollywood to prove its critics wrong by turning its talents to the war effort…No industry professionals played a bigger role in the war than America’s most legendary directors: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens. Between them they were on the scene for almost every major moment of America’s war, and in every branch of service – army, navy, and air force; Atlantic and Pacific; from Midway to North Africa; from Normandy to the fall of Paris and the liberation of the Nazi death camps…With characteristic insight and expert knowledge of these five incredible lives, Harris looks at the ways in which the war changed the history of film forever. (Syndetics summary)

    • New books on Travel for August
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Travel from your armchair with new popular Travel books for August. In this month’s recent picks you’ll go to Jerusalem, Washington D.C., London, Nairobi and St Petersburg, all from the comfort of your own home. If you really want to get out and do something, check out Microadventures which teaches you to explore the place you already live in. Microadventures : local discoveries for great escapes / Alastair Humphreys. “Adventure is a loose word, a spirit of trying something new, trying something difficult. Going somewhere different, leaving your comfort zone. Above all, adventure is about enthusiasm, ambition, open-mindedness and curiosity. Adventure is all around us, at all times. Even during hard financial times such as these. Times when getting out into the wild is more enjoyable, invigorating and important than ever. It is in this inspirational spirit that Alastair Humphreys introduces us to the exciting world of microadventures — adventures that are close to home, cheap, simple, short, and yet very effective.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) The light of Jerusalem / Jean-Michel Berts ; introduction from A beggar in Jerusalem by Elie Wiesel. “Moving, dreamlike excerpts from Nobel Prize#150; winning writer and humanitarian Elie Wiesel’s acclaimed 1968 novel “A Beggar in Jerusalem” introduce this latest volume in Assouline’s The Light of collection. Showcasing Jean-Michel Berts’s textural black-and-white photographs taken on the cusp of daybreak, The Light of Jerusalem captures the poignancy and the poetry of this ancient crossroads. Modern Jerusalem is a multicultural metropolis, a complex layering of the historic and the timeless; this marvelous volume expresses the power and mystery of Jerusalem’s monuments, gardens, and panoramas. Introduction excerpted from “A Beggar in Jerusalem” by Elie Wiesel.” (Syndetics summary) Fragrant heart : a tale of love, life and food in Asia / Miranda Emmerson. “We buy food we can point to. We stalk the streets until rush hour and wait for the little hatches to open in the sides of restaurants. From the steamy openings, cooks in overalls sell jiaozi (dumplings) and bowls of thick, sticky, white congee – an unholy cross between soup and porridge. Baozi, steamed white buns, are light as air. I buy them filled with waterspinach and nettle – delicious dipped in sharp, black Chinese vinegar. In 2008, Miranda and her partner set off for one last big adventure before settling down. They chose to travel through South-East Asia. All did not go to plan: Asianflu, falling off boats and the general chaos of a life abroad challenged them at everystep, and yet, in the midst of it all, they fell in love with the culture and culinary delights of China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and Malaysia.” (Syndetics summary) Southern Cross to Pole Star : Tschiffely’s ride : 10,000 miles in the saddle from Argentina to Washington D.C. / Aimé Tschiffely. “Aimé Tschiffely had an unlikely dream: to ride 10,000 miles from Buenos Aires to New York City. On 23 April 1925 this quiet, unassuming schoolteacher, with little equestrian experience, set out on his epic journey. His only companions were two native Argentine horses called Mancha and Gato. Together the trio traversed the Pampas, scaled the Andes and swam across the crocodile-infested rivers of Colombia. Along the way they were assailed by vampire bats, mistaken for gods and stalked by hostile revolutionaries. After two harrowing years, the man who had originally been labelled ‘a lunatic’ by the press was accorded a ticker-tape parade when he rode triumphantly through the streets of New York. Southern Cross to Pole Star is a classic of the travelwriting genre, ready to reawaken the spirit of adventure in all those who dare to dream big.” (Syndetics summary) Swimming London : the 50 best pools, lidos, lakes and rivers from around the Capital / Jenny Landreth. “London is a city built on water and ideal for swimmers. Whether you are looking for an early morning dip on Hampstead Heath, want to join the Christmas Day Club at Hyde Park’s Serpentine or are searching for a Lido in Tooting, wherever you are in the Capital, you are rarely more than a paddle away from somewhere to swim. Swimming London is a guide, celebration and history of the 50 best swimming spots in London. From the regal baths at the RAC club to the super-chic rooftop pools at the Berkeley Hotel and Shoreditch House; from the open-water havens at Ham Lake and even the River Thames, to the grand old lidos at London Fields and Parliament Hill there is something for the casual swimmer, the long-distance athlete and the family day out.” (book jacket)` Frommer’s easyguide to the Virgin Islands / by Alexis Lipsitz Flippin. “Quick to read, light to carry with expert advice in all price ranges, Frommer’s EasyGuide to the Virgin Islands is the complete up-to-date reference for travelers who want to maximize their stay in the smartest, most efficient way. With Frommer’s trademark candid and accessible expertise, this invaluable guide offers reviews in a wide array of choices available including lodging, sightseeing, shopping, dining and entertainment. It includes insider tips based on time constraints and interests, complete with practical advice and suggested itineraries. With user-friendly features it offers tips on excellent values, special moments, honeymoons or traveling with kids along with overrated experiences. Also featuring the best seafood, people-watching and the best places to connect with nature, snorkeling and diving. Frommer’s EasyGuide to the Virgin Islands is the must-have guide for any traveler.” (Syndetics summary) Africa, my passion / Corinne Hofmann ; translated from the German by Peter Millar. “In an exquisite personal pilgrimage, Corinne Hofmann, author of the global bestseller The White Masai, delves into the slums of Nairobi to uncover the heart-warming and heart-breaking stories of unforgettable people and places. Joined by her half-Kenyan daughter, Napirai, and traveling Kenya together for the first time, they discover Napirai’s roots and finally meet her father and half-siblings. Hofmann then treks 500 miles across the Namibian desert to discover the lives of the nomadic Himba people.” (Syndetics summary) From Crystal Palace to Red Square : a hapless biker’s road to Russia / [Kevin Turner]. “This hilarious travel guide follows critically acclaimed author Kevin Turner (Bonjour! Is This Italy? A Hapless Biker’s Guide to Europe) on another ill-thought out adventure, as he aims his heavily laden Kawasaki northwards towards the towering waterfalls of Norway. Waterfalls done, Turner heads east on a long and treacherous 1700km journey towards St. Petersburg, passing through Sweden and Finland on route. With his sights firmly set on the Nürburgring at the end of his journey, Turner then heads westwards, crossing most of Poland and much of Germany on the long ride home. The author’s observations and anecdotes transform this motorcycle guidebook into a laugh-a-minute page turner, which inspires and entertains in equal measure.” (Syndetics summary) Life cycles : a London bike courier decided to cycle around the globe, 169 days later, he came back with a world record / Julian Sayarer. “Julian Sayarer is an author, journalist, and is often called an adventurer, although normally by other people. He has cycled six times across Europe, and in 2009 broke the 18,000-mile world record for a circumnavigation by bicycle. He has spent three years working as a cycle courier on the streets of London, hitchhiked from New York to San Francisco, and worked on books and documentary projects along the way. A politics graduate, Julian’s writing has appeared in the London Review of Books, New Statesman, Aeon Magazine, and many others, including a host of cycling publications. He writes slow travel, his writing from the roadside a 12mph view of the world in passing.” (Product description from Amazon.co.uk) Walking the literary landscape : 20 classic walks for book-lovers in Northern England / Ian Hamilton, Diane Roberts. “Literature and a love of the English countryside are natural companions. Walking the Literary Landscape brings the two together in a collection of 20 circular routes in the north of England, all between 3 and 9 miles (5 and 15 kilometres) in length. …Walk in the footsteps of writers like Arthur Ransome, who drew inspiration from the Lake District for his classic children’s adventure Swallows and Amazons, or the Brontë sisters whose love of the moors around Haworth echoes through the centuries. See Chatsworth, the Peak District house that thrilled Jane Austen, and tread carefully in Whitby, the Yorkshire seaside town where Bram Stoker set his most famous creation Dracula.” (adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Churton Park Community Centre - What's On to 7th September
      • 29 Aug 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Hi Everyone The SPCA are in tomorrow from 12 – 3pm. Last week seven fur babies found their forever homes at the Tawa Adopt-a-thon – I wonder if we can beat that! For what’s coming up next week, please click here. ON NEXT WEEK·         ** Art of Interiors ** - There are still spots left for the upcoming Art of Interiors seminar, next Wednesday evening at 7.30pm at Churton Park Community Centre. To register, email Christina: Christina@thecompletepicture.co.nz. See attached for further details. ·         ** Churton Park Community Association Meeting ** - the monthly meeting of our local community association is Wednesday 3rd September at 7.30pm in the Small Meeting Room. ·         ** Tai Chi with Janet ** - are you looking for a peaceful and relaxed form of fitness, focusing on mindfulness? Why not try Tai Chi with Janet on Thursday mornings between 10.30 – 12pm. Just $2 to participate, and all are welcome. ·         ** No Vinyasa Flow Yoga ** -  please note that Vinyasa Flow Yoga with Romina on Thursday evenings is cancelled for the next month while Romina takes a well-deserved holiday. Classes resume in October. COMING SOON – MARK YOUR CALENDARS·         ** Free Legal Seminar: Relationship Property ** - Debbie Dunbar from Rainey Collins will be running a seminar to discuss relationship property issues. Monday September 8th at 7.15pm. Please register with tsolomon@raineycollins.co.nz. See attached for further details. ·         ** Free CPR Classes ** - Wellington Free Ambulance will be running two free CPR sessions in October to get you up to speed with assisting someone in cardiac arrest, including the use of a defibrillator. This is especially timely as our Community Centre Defibrillator was used just a few weeks ago. Sessions are on Wednesday 22nd October from 11.30 – 1pm or 7.00 – 8.30pm. Register with me – 830 4802 or beckie.duffy@wcc.govt.nz. ·         ** October School Holidays ** - classes are just being finalised now for School Holidays and will be put up on Facebook as they are confirmed. Classes that have been confirmed so far are:o   ** Khandallah Kids Taekwon-do ** - learn basic self-defence techniques and have fun. For kids aged 5 – 7 years. $9 per child. Sessions run on Tuesday September 30th starting at 11.05am, 12.05pm or 1.05pm. Register through CPCC.o   ** Fondant Characters ** - learn to make fondant cakes toppers just like an expert cake maker! Make a fairy garden or dinosaur jungle with a range of techniques and take home your creation to display or devour! For children 6+, $30 per child (includes lunch). Monday October 6th 11.30 – 2.30pm. Run by local cake maker, Rachel Williams. Register through the Centre.o   ** Brain Bunny Creative Writing Class ** - Brain Bunny Creative Writing Holiday Programmes are about tapping into children’s imaginations and helping them craft a story. During the programme, we'll use a range of guided creative writing exercises to stimulate new ideas for characters, stories and poems, and to help develop ideas children may already have. Suitable both for students who are passionate about creative writing, looking for extension and for students who are struggling with writing in a classroom setting, looking to gain confidence. For children aged 8 – 12years. $35 per child. Register with Brain Bunny: http://brainbunny.co.nz/index.php/enrol-now/ EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST** Social English Sessions ** - Do you have a parent, friend or neighbour who would benefit from learning English via conversation in a relaxed, social and non-pressured environment? We will be starting Social English sessions at CPCC on Friday mornings from mid-October. We would love to get the word out there to people who have English as a second language, are home during the day and who would really benefit this type of session. If this is you, or someone you know please watch this space – more information will be coming closer to the time.COMMUNITY NOTICES** Ohariu Candidate Meetings: The following is a list of candidate meetings for the Ohariu Electorate in the lead up to the General Election:§  Monday 1 September Johnsonville Uniting Church, 7:00 pm§  Tuesday 2 September Ngaio/Crofton Downs Residents, Ngaio Town Hall, 8:00 pm§  Thursday 4 September, Khandallah, Khandallah Town Hall, 1:00 pm§  Monday 8 September Wadestown Residents, St Lukes Hall, 7:30 pm§  Wednesday 10 September Tawa Residents, Tawa Union Church, 7:00 pm§  Thursday 11 September Ngaio Union Church, 7:30 pm§  Tuesday 16 September Khandallah Presbyterian Church, 7:30 pm §  ** Celebrating 10 years of Montessori @ Tawa School ** - Sunday 31 August. Open Day 1 – 2pm, Room 13, Tawa School. Meet the teacher, ask questions, and see the Montessori class environment for 6-12 year olds. 10th Anniversary Celebration 2 – 3:30pm, Tawa School Library. For more information, please visit www.montessoritawa.org or phone 232 3787 a/h. ** Northern Suburbs Stroke Club ** - The Northern Suburbs Stroke Club provides a supportive environment for stroke sufferers and their families. The Club meets on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of every month at the Uniting Church on Dr Taylor Terrace, Johnsonville at 12.15pm. In addition to providing a venue for stroke sufferers to socialise, we have an interesting variety of guest speakers drawn from the community and welfare organisations. The Club is open to stroke survivors and their families together with those who have suffered head injuries. In addition, the Club is looking for volunteers who are willing to serve on the Committee and contribute to the running of the Club. Anyone interested in joining the Club can ring John Brooking on 478 9706. FROM TAWA COMMUNITY CENTREThere will be advanced voting at theTawa Community Centre in the 2 weeks leading up to the NZ elections.  The times are:Wed 3 Sep - Fri 5 Sep 10am - 4pm Sat 6 Sep 10am - 3pm Mon 8 Sep - Wed 10 Sep 10am - 4pm Thu 11 Sep 10am - 8pm Fri 12 Sep 10am - 4pm Sat 13 Sep 10am - 3pm Mon 15 Sep - Fri 19 Sep 10am - 6pm Thu 18 Sep (Late night) 6pm - 8pm To keep up to date with what’s on at CPCC throughout the week, you can follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ChurtonParkCommunityCentre). It’s publically available, so you can view it even if you don’t belong to Facebook. Have a great weekend! Beckie Duffy Community Centre AdvocateChurton Park Community Centre| P 04 830 4802 M 021 247 8741 E beckie.duffy@wcc.govt.nz | W Wellington.govt.nz 

    • 2014 SNZ Secondary School Champs
      • 28 Aug 2014
      • Raumati Swimming Club
      • What an exciting weekend lays ahead for our top college swimmers. The NZ secondary school champs is on over three days from the 30 Aug to 1st September. You know we will be keeping you all posted with the results. We wish our RSC swimmers: Charlotte Meyer, Desiree Grout, Brittany Enoka, Nic Cecioni,  Ballad Woodley-HananRead More... The post 2014 SNZ Secondary School Champs appeared first on Raumati Swimming Club.

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    • http://wellingtonista.com/2014/09/02/political-cuts/feed/
    • Found in 1 places.
      • Political Cuts
    • http://draft.blogger.com/feeds/177466863191235690/posts/default
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      • Bellies Beat Rovers
    • http://www.wellingtontennisclub.org.nz/congrats-john-vogel-2014-mens-champ/feed/
    • Found in 1 places.
      • Congrats, John Vogel: 2014 men’s singles champ
    • http://seniornetwgtn.blogspot.com/feeds/2691577781592302221/comments/default
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      • Workshop – Smart Phones, Tuesday 9 September, 10.00 am – 12 Noon
    • http://kjohnsonnz.blogspot.com/feeds/7570865413588358620/comments/default
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      • Island Bay 'Seawall, Road Closure and Traffic Diversion Plans'
    • http://amesburydrive.blogspot.com/feeds/2312600922306495253/comments/default
    • Found in 1 places.
      • Headlice Alert - August 2014
    • http://strathmorepark.org/2014/09/01/wellington-and-regional-city-council-transparency-join-strathmore-park-now/feed/
    • Found in 1 places.
      • Wellington and Regional City Council Transparency – Join Strathmore Park now
    • http://circatheatre.blogspot.com/feeds/6056673610340305663/comments/default
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      • David McPhail as Walt Disney
    • http://wellington.scoop.co.nz/?feed=rss2&p=70412
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      • On the waterfront: another private building on public land
    • http://www.butterflyadvertising.ie/index.php/feed/
    • Found in 1 places.
      • PYbWlPmRzCuX


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