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    • Amesbury School Community Partnership Agreement
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • This document was developed in the first year of operation to describe how we would work together in a home-school partnership. This document has just been reviewed by the Board of Trustees and we think it is still very current and describes really well how we should all treat each other. As a staff we will use it as the basis of some reflection about how well we are carrying out our role in the partnership. We know there is always room for improvement. Perhaps, this is something we could all do. If having read this, you have any revisions to suggest, please do not hesitate to contact me. Amesbury School CommunityCommunity Partnership 1.     Purpose There is a large body of evidence to suggest that educating children is most effective when there is a strong partnership between home and school. This partnership has a significant impact on the levels of student achievement and happiness of children at school. This research also suggests that the nature and focus of the partnership is significant in terms of what the partnership achieves and how well functioning it is. The purpose of this Community Partnership document is to establish a framework that ensures parents/caregivers, teachers and students are working together effectively in a way that positively impacts outcomes for students. 2.     Parties to the Community Partnership The parties to the Community Partnership are Amesbury School:·         Parents and caregivers·         Teachers 3.     The joint endeavour: Our task - educating our children Through:·         a supportive community; ·         the provision of a broad range of experiences;·         creative, fun-filled learning programmes; ·         meeting the needs of students and increasingly empowering them to take responsibility for their learning;·         a culture that is underpinned by strong family values and inclusivity; continually develop the potential of all our children to be the best they can be, preparing them for their future and developing in them the capacity to be innovative, questioning, authentic, contributing and responsible adults who live well in and for the world.4.     Roles, responsibilities and expectations of each partySchool:Communication·         Communicating in a range of ways in an open, regular, clear, concise manner to enable access to relevant and timely information·         No surprises - informing parents and caregivers early of any issues related to their child’s learning/behaviour ·         Communicating clearly about the school’s philosophyTransparency·         Acknowledging the centrality of the role of parents and caregivers in their child’s education by always being transparent and treating parents and caregivers as “insiders” in the education of their children·         Regularly reporting on student achievement, providing a very clear picture of where students are at·         Valuing transparency, honesty and integrity in all collection, collation, analysis and reporting of student achievement dataWith students:·         Developing positive relationships  that build their confidence and assist their learning·         Developing in-depth knowledge of students – their individual needs, strengths, weaknesses, gifts and talents and their preferred learning styles. ·         Having high expectations of students – encouraging and motivating students to aim high and do their best·         Intervening early – acting quickly when concerns become clearLearning Programmes·         Providing a broad curriculum that acknowledges the importance of holistic growth and development including the academic disciplines, the arts, creativity, physical education, learning competencies, social justice, and, seeing diversity as a social good·         Providing the most effective learning programmes possible, blending the best of traditional and innovative practices·         Providing programmes that increasingly empower students to take responsibility for  their own learning and ensure that students are engaged meaningfully in shaping their learning pathwaysHome:With your child:·         Doing the best to ensure children are well fed with plenty of brain food and come to school feeling refreshed and in a good, relaxed, positive frame of mind·         Spending quality time with children. Having high level conversations with them. Engaging them in talk about school and their learning. Finding the right questions that open up the conversations·         Ensuring a high level of attendance at school and informing the school in a timely manner of all non-attendance ·         Remembering that each child is on a learning journey and that the journey will look different for each child. Comparing one child’s achievement with another is not helpful or necessarily relevant·         Taking every opportunity to know your child as a learner·         Supporting/reinforcing children’s learning. Using the documentation provided by the school to identify areas of need and providing supportCommunication·         Keeping the school informed of all relevant issues and information·         Being open and receptive to information regarding children’s learning and behaviour·         Seeking information/clarification when you don’t understand or have not received the information you would find helpfulEngagement·         Being actively involved/engaged in school activities ·         Attending parent/teacher/student learning conferences  and being proactive in initiating discussions with teachers·         Understanding the school’s philosophy and contributing to its development. With teachers·         Having realistic expectations of teachers’ time and availability Both parties: ·         At all times, being protective of the school’s reputation and speaking positively about the school with/in front of students, with each other, in the school and wider community·         Always speaking positively about each other – teachers, parents, students. Giving the benefit of the doubt and avoiding negative, deficit thinking. Not making assumptions – checking things out·         Showing grace to each other - no one is perfect and all are busy. Being realistic in our expectations of each other·         Being non-defensive in all interactions and giving consideration to the perspectives of others·         Providing/taking opportunities to get together and dialogue about issues of importance·         Contributing to the ongoing development of the school through surveys and consultation processes. But not always waiting until asked – being proactive 5.     Support: The parties agree: ·         To enable, encourage and support each other to carry out their roles and responsibilities·         To value the contribution made by each party and to make this known to the other 6.     The parties agree that we will treat each other in the following ways: ·         Open communication: Seeking to understand each other’s perspectives and being open to the fact that our own perspectives may not be accurate·         Use face-to-face communication for difficult conversations as much as possible and arrange an appropriate time and place·         Be willing to put our names to all feedback and be prepared for it to create a conversation·         Be positive in the way we feed back. Praise and encourage each other and always be solutions-focused ·         Ensure all interactions are respectful, appropriate and kind – concerned with the other’s good as well as our own ·         Honour our commitments·         Value each other’s cultural perspectives 7.     Resolving differences Addressing concerns with the person concerned using the approaches outlined above will be normal practice at Amesbury School. If after these “normal” approaches, concerns still remain, the school will have a Complaints Policy which will outline good practice for taking the matter forward. 8.     Review of the Partnering Document The Community Partnership will be reviewed annually and shared with the community regularly. 9.     Appendix A: Complaints Policy

    • Wellington City Council Debt – Overall Capital Spending
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      • LEAD IN  This is the second of a number of articles that will review the stewardship of Wellington CEO Kevin Lavery and WCC’s proposed ‘Gamble for Growth’ under Mayor Celia Wade-Brown. It provides necessarily brief assessments of some of the issues surrounding current and projected Council Spending, covering operational expenses, project appraisal and forward budgeting. It is ‘necessarily brief’ mainly because citizen ratepayers / stakeholders / shareholders such like me are not privy to the degree of financial detail required for proper assessments. A second issue is that I am doing this for absolutely no $ compensation – zilch, zero. And I will add that I would be happy to analyse the Council’s books for free if I am given open computer access to its financial records. If signing a Confidentiality Agreement is required, I would be happy to do so but this would go hand in hand with some form of limited monetary recompense. This is an Open Offer then to Councillors. Employ me at $125 per hour with staged report backs and a maximum total spend of $20,000 and I will report to you in Closed Session and guarantee Confidentiality. LAVERY’S RESPONSE ON OPERATIONAL COSTS AND OVER-STAFFING Kevin Lavery states his facts as follows:  ‘Taxpayers Union spin doctor Jordan Williams that the Wellington City Council is overstaffed compared with other councils. He claimed there are 65 ratepayers for every member of Wellington's staff compared with 85 in Christchurch and 87 in Auckland. The arithmetic behind this claim is nonsense. ‘The Taxpayers Union talks of "ratepayers"- that is, people - when the actual figures are calculated on individual rated properties. So the problem for the Taxpayers Union is that the rated properties in Wellington could include an office block containing 500 people, as much as a family home or apartment containing one or two ratepayers. ‘The reason Wellington, then, has a lower ratio of "ratepayers" to council staff is because we have a higher proportion of big commercial ratepayers and a smaller residential population than Auckland and Christchurch. So the analysis is both meaningless and misleading’. Comments In one sense, neither Jordan Williams nor Lavery are right. We need to distinguish statistics relating to Residential Ratepayers from those relating to Commercial / Business Ratepayers [as I have long argued in this web magazine]. However, given the population density of Wellington City and, in particular, number of Inner City apartment dwellers [now totalling 13,000 – people who can be more easily provided with Council services than folk in the suburbs], I am sceptical of Lavery’s claim that Williams is ‘spinning the data’. On balance though, setting aside Lavery’s hyperbole about the Ratepayers’ Union’s ‘nonsense’ and its assessments being ‘meaningless and misleading’, I am prepared to accept that it is difficult to cross-compare councils unless you employ highly refined benchmarks – and that to a certain extent: ‘comparing the Wellington City Council and the Hutt City Council - or indeed any other council - is comparing apples with pears’. LAVERY’S RESPONSE ON DEBT – OVERALL REVENUE AND DEBT Lavery: ‘To compare financial health, the whole balance sheet needs to be taken into account. With a debt- to-asset ratio of 5.2 per cent (the local-government average is just over 9 per cent) and debt-to- income ratio of about 100 per cent, this shows the Wellington council is in good financial shape. ‘Our debt-to-income ratio is the lowest of all the metropolitan councils. Putting it into simple terms, if we wanted to wipe our existing $373 million in debt quickly, we could sell our income- generating assets - like our share of the airport company and our commercial property leases. ‘We would still have money- making assets left over. That being said, the income we earn from the airport and our leasehold land is more than enough to service the interest on our debt. In other words, we are not stinging ratepayers when we borrow to pay for infrastructure upgrades and for the good things in life’. Initial Comments Central Government’s Report ‘Better Local Government’ released in March 2012 notes the following levels of debt increase between 2002 and 2010: Carterton 4 per cent Horowhenua 581 per cent Hutt City 11 per cent Kapiti Coast 33 per cent Masterton 179 per cent Porirua 32 per cent South Wairarapa 2117 per cent Upper Hutt 72 per cent Wellington 200 per cent.  A 200 percent rise 2002-2010 is hardly exemplary. The WCC’s 2013/14 Draft Annual Plan estimates that debt will be $397.7 million by the end of the Financial Year and envisages additional borrowings of $36 million during the year. Back in [Do I really hear myself say this] the ‘Good Old Days of Geoff Poole and Kerry Prendergast’ debt was forecast to rise to ‘only’ $369.6 million by June 2019 by which time interest costs were projected at about $24 million per year. Last year I made my own forecasts and came up with $40 million on a worst case scenario by 2019. But like a Beijing Politburo, WCC has now come up with its ‘8 Good Things’ which involve spending A LOT OF MONEY, as Katie Chapman reported in the Dom 15/07/2014: ‘A presentation from council staff working on budgets for the next 10 years looks at various funding possibilities, one of which could be a rates increase above 10 per cent in 2015-16. ‘Another scenario, spreading out costs across the decade, involves an increase of about 6 per cent for 2015-16. ‘In recent years, rates rises have been held to about 2.5 per cent [My Note: This is the average and does not apply to Residential Rates which have been substantially increased vis a vis Commercial / Business Rates under the Rates Rebalancing Programme]. ... ‘Any proposed increase would depend on which projects the councillors decided to prioritise, an official said. "We have got the ability to be able to both respond to and act as a catalyst for a growing economy." 'The projects include the convention centre, runway extension and museums, as well as more cycleways and an Ocean Exploration Centre. ‘The main message to councillors was that they would need to consider ways to increase their economic base to help fund those projects, especially given that the council was emerging from a period during which the emphasis had been on "fiscal prudence" rather than promoting growth’ [direct quote]. Let’s have a look at some base figures [obtained through an OIALGOIMA Request: 12th March 2013]: BASE CASE - PROJECTED SHIFT IN INCOME SOURCES SOURCES OF INCOME Actual LTP forecast LTP forecast LTP forecast 2011/12 2013/14 2015/16 2021/22 $m $m $m $m Downtown levy 11 14.2 13.1 13.4 Business rating exl DT levy 92.5 98.6 107.3 129.4 Household rating 126.8 135.7 147.9 180.2 Development contributions 3.4 5 5 5 Other income 231.6 167.8 169.7 175 TOTAL INCOME 465.3 421.3 443 503 SOURCES OF INCOME Actual LTP forecast LTP forecast LTP forecast 2011/12 2013/14 2015/16 2021/22 % % % % Downtown levy 2% 3% 3% 3% Business rating exl DT levy 20% 23% 24% 26% Household rating 27% 32% 33% 36% Development contributions 1% 1% 1% 1% Other income 50% 40% 38% 35% TOTAL INCOME 100% 100% 100% 100%  You can see that total income is expected to rise from around $421 million in 2013/14 to around $503 million in 2012/22 [by about 19 percent in total]. It is also clear that, thanks to WCC’s Rates Rebalancing Policy, the proportion of revenue generated from household / residential rating was expected to rise from 27 percent to 36 percent over the period, with the proportion funded by Business Rating rebounding somewhat also from 20 percent to 26 percent, as Other Income Sources declined [Note that the proportions of funding drawn from Business and Residential rates crossed in 2004/05 – prior to that the former was always larger]. As I have already said, I don’t have the data to properly assess the effects of ‘a rates increase above 10 per cent in 2015-16’. However, I can apply this to the above series to get a ‘Back of the Envelope’ figure. This suggests that an extra $200 million will be drawn from Ratepayers in the period 2015/16 to 2021/22. Again, sticking my neck out [with some insight as to how CEO’s like Lavery think], I would guess that he envisages taking an extra $200 million from Ratepayers to 2021/22 while borrowing an additional $200 million. This would give a $400 kitty for the Gamble for Growth ‘8 Good Things’. I am happy to be corrected. Currently, WCC has debts of $373 million and a debt-to-asset ratio of 5.2%. Now let’s suppose that either WCC cannot agree to increase the rates burden, or that ceteris paribus soaking ratepayers is essentially borrowing from individual householders, then the debt burden will double by 2021/22 and the debt-to-asset ratio will rise to over 10 percent [and above that of  comparable councils into the danger zone]. Quite whether Central Government will allow this is moot of course. I’ll leave it there this time around. Plenty of food [hard cheddar] for thought.

    • Tararua Tramping Club political debate
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • When:  Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 8:00pm - 10:00pm Eugenie Sage and representataives of other Political Parties debate: Climate change - the transition from fossil fuels to renewables, and mitigation / adaptation for NZ's natural ecosystemsFreshwater quality - support for intensive agriculture versus maintenance and enhancement of freshwater qualityBiodiversity threats/pest control - support for the Battle for Our Birds and increasing use of 1080 for predator control.Role of DoC - protection/use of conservation/stewardship land (including West Coast logging), DOC's RMA advocacyRMA - Does your party support the removal or downgrading of key environmental bottom lines in Part II of the RMA?Marine management - need for a clear marine planning framework that includes marine protection?

    • Weekly Club Roundup - 28th July 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Oriental Rongotai Football Club
      • Not quite HOBM showed why they will be hot favourites for next weekend’s Jubilee Cup final with an impressive first half at Hutt Rec. Hats off to our guys who scored four well taken tries in the second stanza but the damage had been done. Elsewhere wins for our Seconds, Women’s and Presidents (8 on the trot!) and the dynamic U13s’ remain unbeaten, see below for a match report. All Blacks Congratulations to Ma’a and Julian, named in the ABs’ squad for The Rugby Championship Wellington U19s’ A season where he consistently played to a high level has seen Premier lock Liam Hallam-Eames named in the Wellington U19 team for 2014. There is no longer a Wellington Colts side as U19s is now the springboard to NZ U20 selection- good luck Liam your selection is just reward for your outstanding contribution this year. Wellington Pride Congratulations to the following players who have been chosen to represent the Wellington Pride this season: Annie Mativa, Fuamai Taumoli, Joanah Ngan-Woo, Kirstin Stewart, Elizabeth Goulden, Kauna Lopa, Fa’asua Makisi, Amanda Rasch, and Timena Tuma’ai. Wellington 7s’ The Wellington 7s’ squad has been named – well done Ambrose Curtis and Andrew Ellis on your selection. Wellington u16's Congratu;ations to the 8 boys from Rongotai College 1st XV who have made their respective u16 teams to participate in the Hurricanes tournament in late Sepetmber. This is the most boys from Rongotai to be selected across the two teams and is a testimony to the programme that is being implemented at our community school and reflects the young make up of the team. Also congratulations to Mason malagama'ali'i who will be the head coach of the Development side U16A Karl Brownlie Elijah Nafatali Denny To'o Malachai Unasa U16 Development Farani Pritchard-Kiriau Caleb Toleafoa Isalei Pouvalu Tyrell Samia Junior Results Six wins and three losses with two teams still unbeaten – go the mighty U8 and U 13 Magpies Paragon Builders U13s’ The team had the first game back after 2 weeks off due to the school holidays, at home against Poneke with kick off at 10am. The team wore their new tops which looked great. The 1st half started off with a try to Eti within the first minute and we all thought that it was going to be another high scoring game.  However, after that try things slowed down a lot - Half time score was Ories 7 / Poneke 0 The second half stated and we started to play rugby with some quick passes through the back line, which was great to watch and the forwards doing their job and supplying quality ball. Full time score was Ories 33 / Poneke 5. Tries were scored by Eti 2, Roderick 2, Dylan 1 and Ezrah kicking 4 out of 5 Conversions POD was Lufi Stats for the season so far: Played: 10 Won: 10 Points For: 511 Points Against: 70 Premier Match Report Courtesy of The Dom Post Ories 26 (Ambrose Curtis, Matt Proctor, Tutasi Masoe, Paulo Aukuso tries, James Proctor 3 Cons). Hutt Old Boys Marist 43 (Chase Tiatia 2, James O'Reilly, Jeremy Thrush, Glen Walters, Parataiso Silafai-Leaana, Dan McCool tries, Sheridan Rangihuna 4 Cons) HT 31-0. Best and fairest: 3 points: James O'Reilly (HOBM Hooker), 2 points: Fereti Soloa (HOBM Fullback), 1 Point: Pau Halafihi (Ories Flanker) Venue: Hutt Rec What happened: Top qualifiers Hutt Old Boys Marist booked themselves a Jubilee Cup finals spot after convincingly beating Ories in an entertaining match played in ideal conditions. It was a case of third time lucky for HOBM after being pipped by Ories twice in recent semi-final meetings. After a build-up dominated by who might not show for Ories, neither of the Savea brothers nor Ma'a Nonu suited up, while Hurricanes team-mate Motu Matu'u lasted only 23 minutes. By that stage the game was all but over with HOBM providing a clinic in playing territory rugby and scorching in for four tries to open up a 26-0 advantage. When Glen Walters waltzed through to score on half time, they were in full control at 31-0. Ories were better in the second half and with the game opening up, their dangerous backline made their mark to score four consolation tries. It was too little too late however and HOBM took their limited opportunities nicely while taking the chance to empty their bench early and rest up for next week’s final. Who stood out: NZ Under 20’s hooker James O’Reilly was outstanding for HOBM with his work-rate on attack and defence remarkable. Locks Jeremy Thrush and Steven Bradshaw ensured a solid platform for their backline. Sheridan Rangihuna used this platform wisely while fullback Tomasi Alosio was classy at the back having a hand in numerous long range tries. For Ories, Pau Halafihi kept going until the end, while Paulo Aukuso - in what could be his last game for the club - showed he will be missed. Fittingly, he crashed over to score in the final play of the game. The upshot: HOBM have been the best side in the Jubilee Cup and deserve to start favourites in what promises to be a memorable match-up versus near neighbours Wainuiomata. They have a nice mix of experience and youthful talent. A disappointing finish to the season for Ories. One wonders what effect this week’s player distractions had on the team. {youtube}NPIaF2lTFSs{/youtube} Women’s This week the girls had a full 80 minutes of footy – long enough to put 131 unanswered points on Tawa who are sitting in 6th place. We haven’t received the individual scores details yet  but at a guess Lizzie banged over most of the conversions and has probably scored 100 points this round as she started with 80 and probably scored a try or three. Rongotai College 1st XV WBD v Naenae College Saturday v St Bernards @ St Bernards in the Plate (5th - 8th) Semi Final, 2:30pm www.rcrugby.org.nz Netball More wins than losses continue for the netball division. Our S1 team defeated Wgtn Girls Coll 4 28-26 and our S2 team went within a whisker of winning before drawing with Vic Uni 8 26 all. Listening to the game? Coverage is now on Radio Sport 93.7fm and 1503am. Fans can also follow the scoring action on Twitter (The Saturday Rugby Club) and Facebook with the same name. Club Rugby Extra Time This season one game in the Premier competition will be available online! Holden Bros. Media

    • Newsletter - August 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Beekeepers Association
      • The August 2014 issue of the newsletter is available for download below.  As usual there are two versions: 1. Plain pages 2. Booklet format AttachmentSize WBA-Newsletter-2014-08-plain.pdf392.69 KB WBA-Newsletter-2014-08-booklet.pdf307.97 KB

    • Free Education Perfect access for Y11 students
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • Education Perfect has made this  available for all Year 11 science students  in both Bio/Chem and Phys/Chem course. There is no charge as we are offered a free trial for 2014. Boys just need to collect their password from their teacher to  get access to the website from home or  school. read more

    • Business Newsletter – July 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Welcome to the July enewsletter. This means we are halfway through the year and on the downward slope to Summer. We’ve had lots of new books come into the Library this first half of the year. I’ve been to several business related events recently, including the Entrepreneurs meet-up, and the Ministry of Ethnic Affairs organised EPIC NZ Conference which was a great chance to meet up with a really interesting group of different ethnic small business owners. Library News We now have Zinio eMagazines Management Riding the creative rollercoaster : how leaders evoke creativity, productivity and innovation / Dr. Nick Udall. “Leadership is about creating opportunities for individuals and teams in order to cultivate innovation at all levels of an organization. The only way to shape purposeful, meaningful and successful futures is through innovation. This book turns the current understanding of innovation on its head. It explores how innovation is actually a mindset, not a business led process. How we think, relate, learn and organize either moves us towards this mindset or away from it. It’s time for leaders to move to a multi-dimensional view of innovation, where creative breakthrough is evoked by design. Rewriting the rules of innovation, each chapter reveals a different part of the puzzle, giving the reader new insights to re-order and re-pattern what leadership in today’s world can achieve”– Provided by publisher Finding the space to lead : a practical guide to mindful leadership / by Janice Marturano. “Great resource…As a certified coach this is the resource I’ve been looking for. Working with leaders for 11 years, teaching these tools is an integral part of our work. Now we have Janice’s tips, practices, and realistic ways to integrate mindfulness into our busy days. This book includes the role of emotions in leadership (often ignored or barely acknowledged), practical methods such as desk chair meditation, and purposeful pauses. I highly recommend this book.” (Amazon reviewer) The brain sell : when science meets shopping : how the new mind sciences and the persuasion industry are reading our thoughts, influencing our emotions and stimulating us to shop / Dr. David Lewis. “The Perfect Guide to Neuromarketing, What makes David Lewis’s book so impressive is the balance it strikes between conveying his undoubted expertise in investigating the way consumers’ brains work and his candour about the limitations of neuromarketing techniques like EEG and fMRI. Lewis evidently understands the subject with the depth that reflects his academic background, however his written style is light and accessible and the book is peppered with real-world examples that reveal how companies capitalise on the way in which our brains work (which is appreciably different from how we think we think!).” (Amazon UK reviewer) Read more Personal Development Because we can all do with a little bit of help and encouragement, here is a selection of books that will guide you through life’s meandering journey. Could I do that? “ Hands up who feels like a completely inadequate underachiever whenever you hear about someone’s great achievement. When someone in the office is off cycling around the world, or someone on TV has just launched a great new business which will save the planet? Most of us envy the drive and determination of these people. They’ve actually made this stuff happen rather than just day-dreamed about it. We all ask… Could I Do That? Well Simon Hartley is here to show us that we can! Taking on a challenge – big or small – in your career or personal life, can be intimidating but also totally transformational. Simon will show us how to work out what it is we want to do and then how to make that happen. He uses examples and advice from others who have achieved big things. The book examines how you should go about preparing for change, which problems you’ll face along the way, and demonstrates why and how your life will be better as a consequence. Practical and motivational, it’s about embracing change and defeating limiting beliefs It challenges readers to think big and take steps to achieving their goals It puts power in the hands of people who don’t yet realise that they can do extraordinary things too.” (From amazon.com) Risk savvy : how to make good decisions / Gerd Gigerenzer. Posits that “most of us, including doctors, lawyers, financial advisers, and elected officials, misunderstand statistics much more often than we think, leaving us not only misinformed, but vulnerable to exploitation. Yet there is hope. Anyone can learn to make better decisions for their health, finances, family, and business without needing to consult an expert or a super computer, and Gigerenzer shows us how”. (Syndetics) The good psychopath’s guide to success / Kevin Dutton & Andy McNab ; cartoons by Rob Murray. “What is a good psychopath? And how can thinking like one help you to be the best that you can be? Dr Kevin Dutton has spent a lifetime studying psychopaths. He first met former SAS hero Andy McNab during a research project. What he found surprised him. McNab is a diagnosed psychopath but he is a GOOD PSYCHOPATH. Unlike a BAD PSYCHOPATH, he is able to dial up or down qualities such as ruthlessness, fearlessness, conscience and empathy to get the very best out of himself — and others — in a wide range of situations. Using the unique combination of Andy McNab’s wild and various experiences and Professor Kevin Dutton’s expertise in analysing them, together they have explored the ways in which a good psychopath thinks differently and what that could mean for you. What do you really want from life, and how can you develop and use qualities such as charm, coolness under pressure, self-confidence and courage to get it? The Good Psychopath Guide to Success gives you an entertaining and thought-provoking road-map to self-fulfillment both in your personal life and your career.” (Back cover) Read more Computing Our selection for this month includes a book that proposes that “the Internet reflects real-world inequalities as much as it reduces them,” another looks at the use of iPads in the library, and one that discusses the use of android tablets The people’s platform : taking back power and culture in the digital age / Astra Taylor. “The People’s Platform argues that for all our ‘sharing’, ‘up-voting’, and ‘liking’, the Internet reflects real-world inequalities as much as it reduces them… …Employing a mixture of reportage, research and her own experiences working in a creative field, Astra Taylor not only offers an audacious rebuttal to the current Internet orthodoxy, she also presents viable solutions to our predicament. If we want the Internet to be a people’s platform, we will have to make it so.” (Book cover) iPads in the library : using tablet technology to enhance programs for all ages / Joel A. Nichols. “Written for librarians and other library staff, this title provides a wide variety of iPad-based program ideas. Following an explanation for developing and using this type of technology in the library, the introduction further explains the organization of the book and includes suggestions for substituting other tablet devices if iPads are not available.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Andriod tablets explained for all ages / Jim Gatenby. “This book is especially written for new users of Android tablets, as it uses plain English and avoids technical jargon wherever possible. Tablets using the android operating system generally function in a similar manner. However different manufacturers or retailers may add ‘tweeks’ to the operating system to promote their own brand and the sale of ‘Apps’ from their applications store.” (Book jacket) Read more New Zealand non-fiction The days are getting shorter and evenings longer. So it’s the perfect time to come up to the 2nd floor of the Central Library and check out the “new book” area of the New Zealand Reference Collection. Always eclectic and something for everyone. Visible : 60 women at 60 / photography by Jenny O’Connor. “Photographer Jenny O’Connor was born in 1952, the year that the highest number of births was recorded in New Zealand. She, and the women who feature in Visible, are part of the ‘baby boom’ generation. In 2011, as Jenny headed toward her 60th birthday in 2012, she began to wonder how other women nearing this same milestone felt about themselves, how society saw them and what their thoughts about their future were. Jenny’s desire to explore these questions was how this book began; by talking to 60 women who were 60 when she took their photograph. The words are theirs, writing whatever each wanted to say about themselves.” (Syndetics summary) Beyond the state : New Zealand state houses from modest to modern / text, Bill McKay and Andrea Stevens ; photography Simon Devitt. “A full colour illustrated history of New Zealand’s state housing traditions featuring modern-day examples of 14 state houses located around the country, ranging from original to dramatically renovated.” (Publisher’s description) Paul Callaghan : luminous moments / foreword by Catherine Callaghan. “Acknowledged internationally for his ground-breaking scientific research in the field of magnetic resonance, Sir Paul Callaghan was a scientist and visionary with a rare gift for promoting science to a wide audience. He was named New Zealander of the Year in 2011. His death in early 2012 robbed New Zealand of an inspirational leader. Paul Callaghan: Luminous Moments brings together some of his most significant writing. Whether he describes his childhood in Wanganui, reflects on discovering the beauty of science, sets out New Zealand’s future potential or discusses the experience of fatherhood, Sir Paul Callaghan offers eloquent narratives that will endure in this country’s literature. Meeting with the cancer that ended his life, he documents for us all ways of living well in the face of illness. As his daughter Catherine writes in her moving foreword: ‘He became his own scientific experiment.” (publisher desription) Read more Travel stories & Guides Take the plunge, sell the house and travel How to be the world’s smartest traveler (and save time, money, and hassle) / Christopher Elliott. “Elliott, travel expert, columnist, and co-founder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, shares his knowledge in this well-organized, easily understood how-to-travel book. Covering subjects from luggage to effective complaining, he helps the travel consumer understand what factors to consider as well as the benefits and drawbacks of various options. He compares travel agents, online travel agencies, and booking directly and discusses how to find trustworthy information, both offline and online. Sidebars provide tips of what to do and what not to do. The “Problem Solved” articles recount consumer complaints that Elliott helped to solve, often when companies failed to refund travelers’ money. The author emphasizes the importance of paper trails and reading the fine print and offers invaluable details on numerous topics including cell phones, currency, insurance, health, cruises, time shares, and bus travel.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Home sweet anywhere : how we sold our house, created a new life, and saw the world / Lynne Martin. “Reunited after thirty-five years and wrestling a serious case of wanderlust, Lynne and Tim Martin decided to sell their house and possessions and live abroad full-time. They’ve never looked back. With just two suitcases, two computers, and each other, the Martins embark on a global adventure, taking readers from sky-high pyramids in Mexico to Turkish bazaars to learning the contact sport of Italian grocery shopping. But even as they embrace their new home-free lifestyle, the Martins grapple with its challenges, including hilarious language barriers, finding financial stability, and missing the family they left behind. Together, they learn how to live a life–and love–without borders. From glittering Georgian mansions in Ireland to the windswept coasts of Portugal, this euphoric, inspiring memoir is more than a tale of second chances. Home Sweet Anywhere is a road map for anyone who dreams of turning the idea of life abroad into a reality.” (Syndetics summary) Hello, NY : an illustrated love letter to the five boroughs / Julia Rothman. “From beloved author, illustrator, and New Yorker Julia Rothman comes this visual homage to the city she calls home. With humor and tenderness, Rothman offers an eclectic assortment of quirky historical tidbits (how the lion sculptures in front of the New York Public Library got their names), expertise on idiosyncratic places to visit (where to find the tennis courts at Grand Central Station), interviews with locals (thoughts on love and life from a Hasidic Jewish landlord), and personal recollections from growing up in the Bronx (eating fried fish at Johnny’s Reef)–all illustrated in her signature whimsical, hand-drawn style. An illustrated city guide that’s as entertaining as it is informative, this is a treasure for anyone who hearts New York.” (Syndetics summary) Life is a wheel : love, death, etc., and a bike ride across America / Bruce Weber. “Reprising a similar trip he took from California to New York City in 1993, in 2011 New York Times obituary writer and author Weber (As They See ‘Em) bicycled from Oregon to Manhattan. Weber documented the trip for Times Web site, but here he has expanded on those posts to create a lengthier form that allows him to explore deeper themes while still maintaining the conversational style that makes his writing a breeze to read. …Weber never fails to entertain, and his compulsion to always move forward despite the weight of the past is as inspiring as his astounding cycling achievement.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more

    • Amesbury School Community Partnership Agreement
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • This document was developed in the first year of operation to describe how we would work together in a home-school partnership. This document has just been reviewed by the Board of Trustees and we think it is still very current and describes really well how we should all treat each other. As a staff we will use it as the basis of some reflection about how well we are carrying out our role in the partnership. We know there is always room for improvement. Perhaps, this is something we could all do. If having read this, you have any revisions to suggest, please do not hesitate to contact me. Amesbury School CommunityCommunity Partnership 1.     Purpose There is a large body of evidence to suggest that educating children is most effective when there is a strong partnership between home and school. This partnership has a significant impact on the levels of student achievement and happiness of children at school. This research also suggests that the nature and focus of the partnership is significant in terms of what the partnership achieves and how well functioning it is. The purpose of this Community Partnership document is to establish a framework that ensures parents/caregivers, teachers and students are working together effectively in a way that positively impacts outcomes for students. 2.     Parties to the Community Partnership The parties to the Community Partnership are Amesbury School:·         Parents and caregivers·         Teachers 3.     The joint endeavour: Our task - educating our children Through:·         a supportive community; ·         the provision of a broad range of experiences;·         creative, fun-filled learning programmes; ·         meeting the needs of students and increasingly empowering them to take responsibility for their learning;·         a culture that is underpinned by strong family values and inclusivity; continually develop the potential of all our children to be the best they can be, preparing them for their future and developing in them the capacity to be innovative, questioning, authentic, contributing and responsible adults who live well in and for the world.4.     Roles, responsibilities and expectations of each partySchool:Communication·         Communicating in a range of ways in an open, regular, clear, concise manner to enable access to relevant and timely information·         No surprises - informing parents and caregivers early of any issues related to their child’s learning/behaviour ·         Communicating clearly about the school’s philosophyTransparency·         Acknowledging the centrality of the role of parents and caregivers in their child’s education by always being transparent and treating parents and caregivers as “insiders” in the education of their children·         Regularly reporting on student achievement, providing a very clear picture of where students are at·         Valuing transparency, honesty and integrity in all collection, collation, analysis and reporting of student achievement dataWith students:·         Developing positive relationships  that build their confidence and assist their learning·         Developing in-depth knowledge of students – their individual needs, strengths, weaknesses, gifts and talents and their preferred learning styles. ·         Having high expectations of students – encouraging and motivating students to aim high and do their best·         Intervening early – acting quickly when concerns become clearLearning Programmes·         Providing a broad curriculum that acknowledges the importance of holistic growth and development including the academic disciplines, the arts, creativity, physical education, learning competencies, social justice, and, seeing diversity as a social good·         Providing the most effective learning programmes possible, blending the best of traditional and innovative practices·         Providing programmes that increasingly empower students to take responsibility for  their own learning and ensure that students are engaged meaningfully in shaping their learning pathwaysHome:With your child:·         Doing the best to ensure children are well fed with plenty of brain food and come to school feeling refreshed and in a good, relaxed, positive frame of mind·         Spending quality time with children. Having high level conversations with them. Engaging them in talk about school and their learning. Finding the right questions that open up the conversations·         Ensuring a high level of attendance at school and informing the school in a timely manner of all non-attendance ·         Remembering that each child is on a learning journey and that the journey will look different for each child. Comparing one child’s achievement with another is not helpful or necessarily relevant·         Taking every opportunity to know your child as a learner·         Supporting/reinforcing children’s learning. Using the documentation provided by the school to identify areas of need and providing supportCommunication·         Keeping the school informed of all relevant issues and information·         Being open and receptive to information regarding children’s learning and behaviour·         Seeking information/clarification when you don’t understand or have not received the information you would find helpfulEngagement·         Being actively involved/engaged in school activities ·         Attending parent/teacher/student learning conferences  and being proactive in initiating discussions with teachers·         Understanding the school’s philosophy and contributing to its development. With teachers·         Having realistic expectations of teachers’ time and availability Both parties: ·         At all times, being protective of the school’s reputation and speaking positively about the school with/in front of students, with each other, in the school and wider community·         Always speaking positively about each other – teachers, parents, students. Giving the benefit of the doubt and avoiding negative, deficit thinking. Not making assumptions – checking things out·         Showing grace to each other - no one is perfect and all are busy. Being realistic in our expectations of each other·         Being non-defensive in all interactions and giving consideration to the perspectives of others·         Providing/taking opportunities to get together and dialogue about issues of importance·         Contributing to the ongoing development of the school through surveys and consultation processes. But not always waiting until asked – being proactive 5.     Support: The parties agree: ·         To enable, encourage and support each other to carry out their roles and responsibilities·         To value the contribution made by each party and to make this known to the other 6.     The parties agree that we will treat each other in the following ways: ·         Open communication: Seeking to understand each other’s perspectives and being open to the fact that our own perspectives may not be accurate·         Use face-to-face communication for difficult conversations as much as possible and arrange an appropriate time and place·         Be willing to put our names to all feedback and be prepared for it to create a conversation·         Be positive in the way we feed back. Praise and encourage each other and always be solutions-focused ·         Ensure all interactions are respectful, appropriate and kind – concerned with the other’s good as well as our own ·         Honour our commitments·         Value each other’s cultural perspectives 7.     Resolving differences Addressing concerns with the person concerned using the approaches outlined above will be normal practice at Amesbury School. If after these “normal” approaches, concerns still remain, the school will have a Complaints Policy which will outline good practice for taking the matter forward. 8.     Review of the Partnering Document The Community Partnership will be reviewed annually and shared with the community regularly. 9.     Appendix A: Complaints Policy

    • Wellington City Council Debt – Overall Capital Spending
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      • LEAD IN  This is the second of a number of articles that will review the stewardship of Wellington CEO Kevin Lavery and WCC’s proposed ‘Gamble for Growth’ under Mayor Celia Wade-Brown. It provides necessarily brief assessments of some of the issues surrounding current and projected Council Spending, covering operational expenses, project appraisal and forward budgeting. It is ‘necessarily brief’ mainly because citizen ratepayers / stakeholders / shareholders such like me are not privy to the degree of financial detail required for proper assessments. A second issue is that I am doing this for absolutely no $ compensation – zilch, zero. And I will add that I would be happy to analyse the Council’s books for free if I am given open computer access to its financial records. If signing a Confidentiality Agreement is required, I would be happy to do so but this would go hand in hand with some form of limited monetary recompense. This is an Open Offer then to Councillors. Employ me at $125 per hour with staged report backs and a maximum total spend of $20,000 and I will report to you in Closed Session and guarantee Confidentiality. LAVERY’S RESPONSE ON OPERATIONAL COSTS AND OVER-STAFFING Kevin Lavery states his facts as follows:  ‘Taxpayers Union spin doctor Jordan Williams that the Wellington City Council is overstaffed compared with other councils. He claimed there are 65 ratepayers for every member of Wellington's staff compared with 85 in Christchurch and 87 in Auckland. The arithmetic behind this claim is nonsense. ‘The Taxpayers Union talks of "ratepayers"- that is, people - when the actual figures are calculated on individual rated properties. So the problem for the Taxpayers Union is that the rated properties in Wellington could include an office block containing 500 people, as much as a family home or apartment containing one or two ratepayers. ‘The reason Wellington, then, has a lower ratio of "ratepayers" to council staff is because we have a higher proportion of big commercial ratepayers and a smaller residential population than Auckland and Christchurch. So the analysis is both meaningless and misleading’. Comments In one sense, neither Jordan Williams nor Lavery are right. We need to distinguish statistics relating to Residential Ratepayers from those relating to Commercial / Business Ratepayers [as I have long argued in this web magazine]. However, given the population density of Wellington City and, in particular, number of Inner City apartment dwellers [now totalling 13,000 – people who can be more easily provided with Council services than folk in the suburbs], I am sceptical of Lavery’s claim that Williams is ‘spinning the data’. On balance though, setting aside Lavery’s hyperbole about the Ratepayers’ Union’s ‘nonsense’ and its assessments being ‘meaningless and misleading’, I am prepared to accept that it is difficult to cross-compare councils unless you employ highly refined benchmarks – and that to a certain extent: ‘comparing the Wellington City Council and the Hutt City Council - or indeed any other council - is comparing apples with pears’. LAVERY’S RESPONSE ON DEBT – OVERALL REVENUE AND DEBT Lavery: ‘To compare financial health, the whole balance sheet needs to be taken into account. With a debt- to-asset ratio of 5.2 per cent (the local-government average is just over 9 per cent) and debt-to- income ratio of about 100 per cent, this shows the Wellington council is in good financial shape. ‘Our debt-to-income ratio is the lowest of all the metropolitan councils. Putting it into simple terms, if we wanted to wipe our existing $373 million in debt quickly, we could sell our income- generating assets - like our share of the airport company and our commercial property leases. ‘We would still have money- making assets left over. That being said, the income we earn from the airport and our leasehold land is more than enough to service the interest on our debt. In other words, we are not stinging ratepayers when we borrow to pay for infrastructure upgrades and for the good things in life’. Initial Comments Central Government’s Report ‘Better Local Government’ released in March 2012 notes the following levels of debt increase between 2002 and 2010: Carterton 4 per cent Horowhenua 581 per cent Hutt City 11 per cent Kapiti Coast 33 per cent Masterton 179 per cent Porirua 32 per cent South Wairarapa 2117 per cent Upper Hutt 72 per cent Wellington 200 per cent.  A 200 percent rise 2002-2010 is hardly exemplary. The WCC’s 2013/14 Draft Annual Plan estimates that debt will be $397.7 million by the end of the Financial Year and envisages additional borrowings of $36 million during the year. Back in [Do I really hear myself say this] the ‘Good Old Days of Geoff Poole and Kerry Prendergast’ debt was forecast to rise to ‘only’ $369.6 million by June 2019 by which time interest costs were projected at about $24 million per year. Last year I made my own forecasts and came up with $40 million on a worst case scenario by 2019. But like a Beijing Politburo, WCC has now come up with its ‘8 Good Things’ which involve spending A LOT OF MONEY, as Katie Chapman reported in the Dom 15/07/2014: ‘A presentation from council staff working on budgets for the next 10 years looks at various funding possibilities, one of which could be a rates increase above 10 per cent in 2015-16. ‘Another scenario, spreading out costs across the decade, involves an increase of about 6 per cent for 2015-16. ‘In recent years, rates rises have been held to about 2.5 per cent [My Note: This is the average and does not apply to Residential Rates which have been substantially increased vis a vis Commercial / Business Rates under the Rates Rebalancing Programme]. ... ‘Any proposed increase would depend on which projects the councillors decided to prioritise, an official said. "We have got the ability to be able to both respond to and act as a catalyst for a growing economy." 'The projects include the convention centre, runway extension and museums, as well as more cycleways and an Ocean Exploration Centre. ‘The main message to councillors was that they would need to consider ways to increase their economic base to help fund those projects, especially given that the council was emerging from a period during which the emphasis had been on "fiscal prudence" rather than promoting growth’ [direct quote]. Let’s have a look at some base figures [obtained through an OIALGOIMA Request: 12th March 2013]: BASE CASE - PROJECTED SHIFT IN INCOME SOURCES SOURCES OF INCOME Actual LTP forecast LTP forecast LTP forecast 2011/12 2013/14 2015/16 2021/22 $m $m $m $m Downtown levy 11 14.2 13.1 13.4 Business rating exl DT levy 92.5 98.6 107.3 129.4 Household rating 126.8 135.7 147.9 180.2 Development contributions 3.4 5 5 5 Other income 231.6 167.8 169.7 175 TOTAL INCOME 465.3 421.3 443 503 SOURCES OF INCOME Actual LTP forecast LTP forecast LTP forecast 2011/12 2013/14 2015/16 2021/22 % % % % Downtown levy 2% 3% 3% 3% Business rating exl DT levy 20% 23% 24% 26% Household rating 27% 32% 33% 36% Development contributions 1% 1% 1% 1% Other income 50% 40% 38% 35% TOTAL INCOME 100% 100% 100% 100%  You can see that total income is expected to rise from around $421 million in 2013/14 to around $503 million in 2012/22 [by about 19 percent in total]. It is also clear that, thanks to WCC’s Rates Rebalancing Policy, the proportion of revenue generated from household / residential rating was expected to rise from 27 percent to 36 percent over the period, with the proportion funded by Business Rating rebounding somewhat also from 20 percent to 26 percent, as Other Income Sources declined [Note that the proportions of funding drawn from Business and Residential rates crossed in 2004/05 – prior to that the former was always larger]. As I have already said, I don’t have the data to properly assess the effects of ‘a rates increase above 10 per cent in 2015-16’. However, I can apply this to the above series to get a ‘Back of the Envelope’ figure. This suggests that an extra $200 million will be drawn from Ratepayers in the period 2015/16 to 2021/22. Again, sticking my neck out [with some insight as to how CEO’s like Lavery think], I would guess that he envisages taking an extra $200 million from Ratepayers to 2021/22 while borrowing an additional $200 million. This would give a $400 kitty for the Gamble for Growth ‘8 Good Things’. I am happy to be corrected. Currently, WCC has debts of $373 million and a debt-to-asset ratio of 5.2%. Now let’s suppose that either WCC cannot agree to increase the rates burden, or that ceteris paribus soaking ratepayers is essentially borrowing from individual householders, then the debt burden will double by 2021/22 and the debt-to-asset ratio will rise to over 10 percent [and above that of  comparable councils into the danger zone]. Quite whether Central Government will allow this is moot of course. I’ll leave it there this time around. Plenty of food [hard cheddar] for thought.

    • Tararua Tramping Club political debate
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • When:  Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 8:00pm - 10:00pm Eugenie Sage and representataives of other Political Parties debate: Climate change - the transition from fossil fuels to renewables, and mitigation / adaptation for NZ's natural ecosystemsFreshwater quality - support for intensive agriculture versus maintenance and enhancement of freshwater qualityBiodiversity threats/pest control - support for the Battle for Our Birds and increasing use of 1080 for predator control.Role of DoC - protection/use of conservation/stewardship land (including West Coast logging), DOC's RMA advocacyRMA - Does your party support the removal or downgrading of key environmental bottom lines in Part II of the RMA?Marine management - need for a clear marine planning framework that includes marine protection?

    • Weekly Club Roundup - 28th July 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Oriental Rongotai Football Club
      • Not quite HOBM showed why they will be hot favourites for next weekend’s Jubilee Cup final with an impressive first half at Hutt Rec. Hats off to our guys who scored four well taken tries in the second stanza but the damage had been done. Elsewhere wins for our Seconds, Women’s and Presidents (8 on the trot!) and the dynamic U13s’ remain unbeaten, see below for a match report. All Blacks Congratulations to Ma’a and Julian, named in the ABs’ squad for The Rugby Championship Wellington U19s’ A season where he consistently played to a high level has seen Premier lock Liam Hallam-Eames named in the Wellington U19 team for 2014. There is no longer a Wellington Colts side as U19s is now the springboard to NZ U20 selection- good luck Liam your selection is just reward for your outstanding contribution this year. Wellington Pride Congratulations to the following players who have been chosen to represent the Wellington Pride this season: Annie Mativa, Fuamai Taumoli, Joanah Ngan-Woo, Kirstin Stewart, Elizabeth Goulden, Kauna Lopa, Fa’asua Makisi, Amanda Rasch, and Timena Tuma’ai. Wellington 7s’ The Wellington 7s’ squad has been named – well done Ambrose Curtis and Andrew Ellis on your selection. Wellington u16's Congratu;ations to the 8 boys from Rongotai College 1st XV who have made their respective u16 teams to participate in the Hurricanes tournament in late Sepetmber. This is the most boys from Rongotai to be selected across the two teams and is a testimony to the programme that is being implemented at our community school and reflects the young make up of the team. Also congratulations to Mason malagama'ali'i who will be the head coach of the Development side U16A Karl Brownlie Elijah Nafatali Denny To'o Malachai Unasa U16 Development Farani Pritchard-Kiriau Caleb Toleafoa Isalei Pouvalu Tyrell Samia Junior Results Six wins and three losses with two teams still unbeaten – go the mighty U8 and U 13 Magpies Paragon Builders U13s’ The team had the first game back after 2 weeks off due to the school holidays, at home against Poneke with kick off at 10am. The team wore their new tops which looked great. The 1st half started off with a try to Eti within the first minute and we all thought that it was going to be another high scoring game.  However, after that try things slowed down a lot - Half time score was Ories 7 / Poneke 0 The second half stated and we started to play rugby with some quick passes through the back line, which was great to watch and the forwards doing their job and supplying quality ball. Full time score was Ories 33 / Poneke 5. Tries were scored by Eti 2, Roderick 2, Dylan 1 and Ezrah kicking 4 out of 5 Conversions POD was Lufi Stats for the season so far: Played: 10 Won: 10 Points For: 511 Points Against: 70 Premier Match Report Courtesy of The Dom Post Ories 26 (Ambrose Curtis, Matt Proctor, Tutasi Masoe, Paulo Aukuso tries, James Proctor 3 Cons). Hutt Old Boys Marist 43 (Chase Tiatia 2, James O'Reilly, Jeremy Thrush, Glen Walters, Parataiso Silafai-Leaana, Dan McCool tries, Sheridan Rangihuna 4 Cons) HT 31-0. Best and fairest: 3 points: James O'Reilly (HOBM Hooker), 2 points: Fereti Soloa (HOBM Fullback), 1 Point: Pau Halafihi (Ories Flanker) Venue: Hutt Rec What happened: Top qualifiers Hutt Old Boys Marist booked themselves a Jubilee Cup finals spot after convincingly beating Ories in an entertaining match played in ideal conditions. It was a case of third time lucky for HOBM after being pipped by Ories twice in recent semi-final meetings. After a build-up dominated by who might not show for Ories, neither of the Savea brothers nor Ma'a Nonu suited up, while Hurricanes team-mate Motu Matu'u lasted only 23 minutes. By that stage the game was all but over with HOBM providing a clinic in playing territory rugby and scorching in for four tries to open up a 26-0 advantage. When Glen Walters waltzed through to score on half time, they were in full control at 31-0. Ories were better in the second half and with the game opening up, their dangerous backline made their mark to score four consolation tries. It was too little too late however and HOBM took their limited opportunities nicely while taking the chance to empty their bench early and rest up for next week’s final. Who stood out: NZ Under 20’s hooker James O’Reilly was outstanding for HOBM with his work-rate on attack and defence remarkable. Locks Jeremy Thrush and Steven Bradshaw ensured a solid platform for their backline. Sheridan Rangihuna used this platform wisely while fullback Tomasi Alosio was classy at the back having a hand in numerous long range tries. For Ories, Pau Halafihi kept going until the end, while Paulo Aukuso - in what could be his last game for the club - showed he will be missed. Fittingly, he crashed over to score in the final play of the game. The upshot: HOBM have been the best side in the Jubilee Cup and deserve to start favourites in what promises to be a memorable match-up versus near neighbours Wainuiomata. They have a nice mix of experience and youthful talent. A disappointing finish to the season for Ories. One wonders what effect this week’s player distractions had on the team. {youtube}NPIaF2lTFSs{/youtube} Women’s This week the girls had a full 80 minutes of footy – long enough to put 131 unanswered points on Tawa who are sitting in 6th place. We haven’t received the individual scores details yet  but at a guess Lizzie banged over most of the conversions and has probably scored 100 points this round as she started with 80 and probably scored a try or three. Rongotai College 1st XV WBD v Naenae College Saturday v St Bernards @ St Bernards in the Plate (5th - 8th) Semi Final, 2:30pm www.rcrugby.org.nz Netball More wins than losses continue for the netball division. Our S1 team defeated Wgtn Girls Coll 4 28-26 and our S2 team went within a whisker of winning before drawing with Vic Uni 8 26 all. Listening to the game? Coverage is now on Radio Sport 93.7fm and 1503am. Fans can also follow the scoring action on Twitter (The Saturday Rugby Club) and Facebook with the same name. Club Rugby Extra Time This season one game in the Premier competition will be available online! Holden Bros. Media

    • Newsletter - August 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Beekeepers Association
      • The August 2014 issue of the newsletter is available for download below.  As usual there are two versions: 1. Plain pages 2. Booklet format AttachmentSize WBA-Newsletter-2014-08-plain.pdf392.69 KB WBA-Newsletter-2014-08-booklet.pdf307.97 KB

    • Free Education Perfect access for Y11 students
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Scots College
      • Education Perfect has made this  available for all Year 11 science students  in both Bio/Chem and Phys/Chem course. There is no charge as we are offered a free trial for 2014. Boys just need to collect their password from their teacher to  get access to the website from home or  school. read more

    • Business Newsletter – July 2014
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Welcome to the July enewsletter. This means we are halfway through the year and on the downward slope to Summer. We’ve had lots of new books come into the Library this first half of the year. I’ve been to several business related events recently, including the Entrepreneurs meet-up, and the Ministry of Ethnic Affairs organised EPIC NZ Conference which was a great chance to meet up with a really interesting group of different ethnic small business owners. Library News We now have Zinio eMagazines Management Riding the creative rollercoaster : how leaders evoke creativity, productivity and innovation / Dr. Nick Udall. “Leadership is about creating opportunities for individuals and teams in order to cultivate innovation at all levels of an organization. The only way to shape purposeful, meaningful and successful futures is through innovation. This book turns the current understanding of innovation on its head. It explores how innovation is actually a mindset, not a business led process. How we think, relate, learn and organize either moves us towards this mindset or away from it. It’s time for leaders to move to a multi-dimensional view of innovation, where creative breakthrough is evoked by design. Rewriting the rules of innovation, each chapter reveals a different part of the puzzle, giving the reader new insights to re-order and re-pattern what leadership in today’s world can achieve”– Provided by publisher Finding the space to lead : a practical guide to mindful leadership / by Janice Marturano. “Great resource…As a certified coach this is the resource I’ve been looking for. Working with leaders for 11 years, teaching these tools is an integral part of our work. Now we have Janice’s tips, practices, and realistic ways to integrate mindfulness into our busy days. This book includes the role of emotions in leadership (often ignored or barely acknowledged), practical methods such as desk chair meditation, and purposeful pauses. I highly recommend this book.” (Amazon reviewer) The brain sell : when science meets shopping : how the new mind sciences and the persuasion industry are reading our thoughts, influencing our emotions and stimulating us to shop / Dr. David Lewis. “The Perfect Guide to Neuromarketing, What makes David Lewis’s book so impressive is the balance it strikes between conveying his undoubted expertise in investigating the way consumers’ brains work and his candour about the limitations of neuromarketing techniques like EEG and fMRI. Lewis evidently understands the subject with the depth that reflects his academic background, however his written style is light and accessible and the book is peppered with real-world examples that reveal how companies capitalise on the way in which our brains work (which is appreciably different from how we think we think!).” (Amazon UK reviewer) Read more Personal Development Because we can all do with a little bit of help and encouragement, here is a selection of books that will guide you through life’s meandering journey. Could I do that? “ Hands up who feels like a completely inadequate underachiever whenever you hear about someone’s great achievement. When someone in the office is off cycling around the world, or someone on TV has just launched a great new business which will save the planet? Most of us envy the drive and determination of these people. They’ve actually made this stuff happen rather than just day-dreamed about it. We all ask… Could I Do That? Well Simon Hartley is here to show us that we can! Taking on a challenge – big or small – in your career or personal life, can be intimidating but also totally transformational. Simon will show us how to work out what it is we want to do and then how to make that happen. He uses examples and advice from others who have achieved big things. The book examines how you should go about preparing for change, which problems you’ll face along the way, and demonstrates why and how your life will be better as a consequence. Practical and motivational, it’s about embracing change and defeating limiting beliefs It challenges readers to think big and take steps to achieving their goals It puts power in the hands of people who don’t yet realise that they can do extraordinary things too.” (From amazon.com) Risk savvy : how to make good decisions / Gerd Gigerenzer. Posits that “most of us, including doctors, lawyers, financial advisers, and elected officials, misunderstand statistics much more often than we think, leaving us not only misinformed, but vulnerable to exploitation. Yet there is hope. Anyone can learn to make better decisions for their health, finances, family, and business without needing to consult an expert or a super computer, and Gigerenzer shows us how”. (Syndetics) The good psychopath’s guide to success / Kevin Dutton & Andy McNab ; cartoons by Rob Murray. “What is a good psychopath? And how can thinking like one help you to be the best that you can be? Dr Kevin Dutton has spent a lifetime studying psychopaths. He first met former SAS hero Andy McNab during a research project. What he found surprised him. McNab is a diagnosed psychopath but he is a GOOD PSYCHOPATH. Unlike a BAD PSYCHOPATH, he is able to dial up or down qualities such as ruthlessness, fearlessness, conscience and empathy to get the very best out of himself — and others — in a wide range of situations. Using the unique combination of Andy McNab’s wild and various experiences and Professor Kevin Dutton’s expertise in analysing them, together they have explored the ways in which a good psychopath thinks differently and what that could mean for you. What do you really want from life, and how can you develop and use qualities such as charm, coolness under pressure, self-confidence and courage to get it? The Good Psychopath Guide to Success gives you an entertaining and thought-provoking road-map to self-fulfillment both in your personal life and your career.” (Back cover) Read more Computing Our selection for this month includes a book that proposes that “the Internet reflects real-world inequalities as much as it reduces them,” another looks at the use of iPads in the library, and one that discusses the use of android tablets The people’s platform : taking back power and culture in the digital age / Astra Taylor. “The People’s Platform argues that for all our ‘sharing’, ‘up-voting’, and ‘liking’, the Internet reflects real-world inequalities as much as it reduces them… …Employing a mixture of reportage, research and her own experiences working in a creative field, Astra Taylor not only offers an audacious rebuttal to the current Internet orthodoxy, she also presents viable solutions to our predicament. If we want the Internet to be a people’s platform, we will have to make it so.” (Book cover) iPads in the library : using tablet technology to enhance programs for all ages / Joel A. Nichols. “Written for librarians and other library staff, this title provides a wide variety of iPad-based program ideas. Following an explanation for developing and using this type of technology in the library, the introduction further explains the organization of the book and includes suggestions for substituting other tablet devices if iPads are not available.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Andriod tablets explained for all ages / Jim Gatenby. “This book is especially written for new users of Android tablets, as it uses plain English and avoids technical jargon wherever possible. Tablets using the android operating system generally function in a similar manner. However different manufacturers or retailers may add ‘tweeks’ to the operating system to promote their own brand and the sale of ‘Apps’ from their applications store.” (Book jacket) Read more New Zealand non-fiction The days are getting shorter and evenings longer. So it’s the perfect time to come up to the 2nd floor of the Central Library and check out the “new book” area of the New Zealand Reference Collection. Always eclectic and something for everyone. Visible : 60 women at 60 / photography by Jenny O’Connor. “Photographer Jenny O’Connor was born in 1952, the year that the highest number of births was recorded in New Zealand. She, and the women who feature in Visible, are part of the ‘baby boom’ generation. In 2011, as Jenny headed toward her 60th birthday in 2012, she began to wonder how other women nearing this same milestone felt about themselves, how society saw them and what their thoughts about their future were. Jenny’s desire to explore these questions was how this book began; by talking to 60 women who were 60 when she took their photograph. The words are theirs, writing whatever each wanted to say about themselves.” (Syndetics summary) Beyond the state : New Zealand state houses from modest to modern / text, Bill McKay and Andrea Stevens ; photography Simon Devitt. “A full colour illustrated history of New Zealand’s state housing traditions featuring modern-day examples of 14 state houses located around the country, ranging from original to dramatically renovated.” (Publisher’s description) Paul Callaghan : luminous moments / foreword by Catherine Callaghan. “Acknowledged internationally for his ground-breaking scientific research in the field of magnetic resonance, Sir Paul Callaghan was a scientist and visionary with a rare gift for promoting science to a wide audience. He was named New Zealander of the Year in 2011. His death in early 2012 robbed New Zealand of an inspirational leader. Paul Callaghan: Luminous Moments brings together some of his most significant writing. Whether he describes his childhood in Wanganui, reflects on discovering the beauty of science, sets out New Zealand’s future potential or discusses the experience of fatherhood, Sir Paul Callaghan offers eloquent narratives that will endure in this country’s literature. Meeting with the cancer that ended his life, he documents for us all ways of living well in the face of illness. As his daughter Catherine writes in her moving foreword: ‘He became his own scientific experiment.” (publisher desription) Read more Travel stories & Guides Take the plunge, sell the house and travel How to be the world’s smartest traveler (and save time, money, and hassle) / Christopher Elliott. “Elliott, travel expert, columnist, and co-founder of the Consumer Travel Alliance, shares his knowledge in this well-organized, easily understood how-to-travel book. Covering subjects from luggage to effective complaining, he helps the travel consumer understand what factors to consider as well as the benefits and drawbacks of various options. He compares travel agents, online travel agencies, and booking directly and discusses how to find trustworthy information, both offline and online. Sidebars provide tips of what to do and what not to do. The “Problem Solved” articles recount consumer complaints that Elliott helped to solve, often when companies failed to refund travelers’ money. The author emphasizes the importance of paper trails and reading the fine print and offers invaluable details on numerous topics including cell phones, currency, insurance, health, cruises, time shares, and bus travel.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Home sweet anywhere : how we sold our house, created a new life, and saw the world / Lynne Martin. “Reunited after thirty-five years and wrestling a serious case of wanderlust, Lynne and Tim Martin decided to sell their house and possessions and live abroad full-time. They’ve never looked back. With just two suitcases, two computers, and each other, the Martins embark on a global adventure, taking readers from sky-high pyramids in Mexico to Turkish bazaars to learning the contact sport of Italian grocery shopping. But even as they embrace their new home-free lifestyle, the Martins grapple with its challenges, including hilarious language barriers, finding financial stability, and missing the family they left behind. Together, they learn how to live a life–and love–without borders. From glittering Georgian mansions in Ireland to the windswept coasts of Portugal, this euphoric, inspiring memoir is more than a tale of second chances. Home Sweet Anywhere is a road map for anyone who dreams of turning the idea of life abroad into a reality.” (Syndetics summary) Hello, NY : an illustrated love letter to the five boroughs / Julia Rothman. “From beloved author, illustrator, and New Yorker Julia Rothman comes this visual homage to the city she calls home. With humor and tenderness, Rothman offers an eclectic assortment of quirky historical tidbits (how the lion sculptures in front of the New York Public Library got their names), expertise on idiosyncratic places to visit (where to find the tennis courts at Grand Central Station), interviews with locals (thoughts on love and life from a Hasidic Jewish landlord), and personal recollections from growing up in the Bronx (eating fried fish at Johnny’s Reef)–all illustrated in her signature whimsical, hand-drawn style. An illustrated city guide that’s as entertaining as it is informative, this is a treasure for anyone who hearts New York.” (Syndetics summary) Life is a wheel : love, death, etc., and a bike ride across America / Bruce Weber. “Reprising a similar trip he took from California to New York City in 1993, in 2011 New York Times obituary writer and author Weber (As They See ‘Em) bicycled from Oregon to Manhattan. Weber documented the trip for Times Web site, but here he has expanded on those posts to create a lengthier form that allows him to explore deeper themes while still maintaining the conversational style that makes his writing a breeze to read. …Weber never fails to entertain, and his compulsion to always move forward despite the weight of the past is as inspiring as his astounding cycling achievement.” (adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more

    • Wellington City Council Debt – Slippery Lavery
      • 31 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      •  LEDE This is the first of a number of articles that will review the stewardship of Wellington CEO Kevin Lavery and WCC’s proposed ‘Gamble for Growth’ under Mayor Celia Wade-Brown. IF YOU HOLD THE FACTS, HOW CAN WE DISAGREE? In June 2014, the first Ratepayers’ Report was issued providing benchmark statistics for New Zealand’s Local Government Bodies, thanks to a joint initiative by the Ratepayers’ Union and Fairfax Media. See: http://www.ratepayersreport.co.nz/ In its coverage of the results of the Report, the Dominion Post noted with respect to Wellington City Council that: ‘The data showed Wellington City Council was spending more on employees and debt compared with both the national average and the average for councils with populations over 100,000. ‘But when council-controlled organisations and investment companies were factored in, Wellington city came out more favourably, compared with other large councils. ‘The average residential rates bill in Wellington city this past financial year was $2163, while Hutt City ratepayers forked out $2006 and Upper Hutt ratepayers $1733. The Report also quoted RU Chief Executive Jordan Williams as saying that: “In Wellington there were 65 ratepayers for every member of staff, compared with 85 in Christchurch and 87 in Auckland. “I think Wellington's debt is probably reaching the upper limit . . . for every Wellington ratepayer, the council owes $7,547.” See: http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/10142126/Hutt-Valley-tops-for-ratepayer-value This led to a very tetchy response by Wellington City Council Chief Executive Kevin Lavery ‘Superfical Ratings Play Fast and Loose with Data’ See: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/10180583/Superficial-ratings-play-fast-and-loose-with-data And the Dominion Post’s humble pie reply at: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/10192338/Report-provides-objective-council-data Lavery’s response has a definitely bumptious, blustering and bullying tone, describing the number-crunching of the RU as ‘amateurish’ and he quotes with approval Mark Twain’s dictum that "facts are stubborn things but statistics are pliable". One might well ask though I couldn’t possibly comment ‘Why it has taken an independent institution like the RU to commence bench-marking and why it has taken so much hard work to elicit the data?’ Could it be that Local Government NZ is in thrall to the LGA CEOs or is just too lazy to do the job? And try finding hard data about specifics in the financial data that WCC publishes in its Quarterly Reports or elsewhere on line – it is like the proverbial ‘trying to pull hen’s teeth’. As for Mark Twain, he also said: ‘Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please’.  He who holds the facts under his blotter controls the argument.  And on the subject of statistics, I prefer the dictum that my old Tutor at Cambridge used to often quote: ‘Statistics are like a bikini – what they reveal is interesting but what they conceal is often vital’. PAYING UP AND HIDING THE TRUTH Back in September of 2012, Wellington Resident Milo Davies complained that he was forced to pay a 10 percent penalty for being more than 10 days late on his rates payment. He characterized this as ‘the sort of punitive action you'd expect from a loan shark - levelled at a ratepayer with a 10 year history of on time payments’. Wellington City Council responded: ‘Sorry Milo but unfortunately it's the law - and it's a national law so you'll get stung with a 10% penalty no matter which council you pay your rates to - Regards Richard MacLean, WCC Communications’. I am sure that Kevin Lavery would have applauded Mr MacLean. The trouble with this is that it is a clear case of ‘Don’t Do as I Do – Do as I say’. As the Plymouth Herald of 15 July 2014 notes: ‘The former chief executive of Cornwall Council has been named as an investor in one of Britain’s biggest tax avoidance schemes ['Liberty']. Kevin Lavery, who was seen as a champion of outsourcing services to the private sector, is reported to have put £1.2 million into the Liberty scheme, according to the Times newspaper. ‘Before leaving Cornwall Council last year to take up a job leading Wellington City Council in New Zealand, Mr Lavery was earning pay and benefits amounting to £245,000. The Western Morning News contacted Mr Lavery in New Zealand. ‘He said that he did not wish to comment and that his tax affairs were a private matter. ... ‘The Times called Liberty one of Britain’s “most aggressive tax avoidance schemes” which has sought to shelter a total of £1.2 billion. ... ‘It revolved around the creation of an offshore tax loss for investors which they could offset against their own income but without actually losing any money. Only higher rate taxpayers who pay income tax at 40-50% were eligible to join Liberty. ‘According to the Times, a member paying an average of £70,000 in fees could earn £1 million a year tax-free. Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has been investigating Liberty for more than a decade and is set to challenge it in the courts next year. Nevertheless, under new Treasury rules due to be brought in this month, Liberty members are likely to have to pay back hundreds of millions of pounds in disputed tax before the hearing. ‘Mr Lavery joined Cornwall Council in 2008 and was the steady hand which guided the authority in its formative years at a unitary authority following its creation and the abolition of five former district councils. ‘When he left five years later to take a lower paid job on the other side of the world there was intense speculation that it was because he had failed to win support for a daring scheme, a controversial privatisation package whose ditching also saw the then leader, Alec Robertson, ousted. ‘Mr Lavery said before he left the post that this was not the reason for his resignation and that he remained convinced the deal was the best plan for Cornwall’. Perhaps there were additional reasons for Kev doing a bunk half way across the world. See:http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/Cornwall-Council-chief-executive-named-investor/story-21464839-detail/story.html#ixzz390dNp3Pu You can also read about this ‘CEOcracy: a textbook example’ under the heading 'How to Be a Complete Bastard’ at: http://howtobeacompletebastard.blogspot.co.nz/2014/07/ceocracy-textbook-example.html As Mark Twain also said: ‘To succeed in life you need two things – ignorance and confidence’.  

    • New Students - Term 3, Week 2
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Welcome to the following student(s) who joined Amesbury School this week. Ruby Conway

    • TV shows beggar belief
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Eye of the Fish
      • A slight digression from buildings in New Zealand – while I’m watching one of those house-building programs about self-build housing in the UK. This one, on Tuesday nights on TV3, is called “The House that £100,000 Built“. Ruth and Tony’s “cash-strapped” project in Shropshire was the feature house this week, with a timber-clad couple of boxes that look similar, but not as sophisticated, to an architecturally-designed New Zealand house. I’m puzzled though, because as with all these shows, the commentary seems to be that they make it up as they go along. A large Rayburn range cooker, de rigeur for every pommie middle-class rural house, was financed by the deletion of a sedum green roof. The external brise soleil was deleted as well, to help pay for the cladding. How can they do this? With the Grand Designs program, hosted of course by the wonderful Kevin McLeod, there was frequent featuring of the architects, and discussion about who was going to take on the project management role. It makes for good television when everything goes pear-shaped, but I’ve never quite understood how the awkward phase of “getting it through council” works with these programs. I know when I worked in the UK that this took quite some time, and I don’t remember any instances of Council being at all helpful with getting random alterations / deletions approved. The Aussie version of Grand Designs was closer to what happens in NZ, although for some reason that Peter guy never really grabbed me – he was trying far too hard to be Kevin-lite. It will be interesting to see how the show comes across in NZ (they’re filming it now / over the last several months / year) as we all know the trials and tribulations of getting our helpful Council officers to agree to anything out of the ordinary. (The NZ presenter of the show is of course a big secret, although I found out who it was the other day, and so probably half of New Zealand’s architectural profession already knows. Obviously, they did not ask me – fish are rarely photogenic enough for prime time, except on the ITM fishing show…). It’s a poisoned chalice – I hope our NZ presenter enjoys it… Previous hosts of reality TV shows, like the Mitre-10 Dream Home, were hosted by Roger Walker, who already had some fame for a number of reasons, including his partial hosting of a program of petrol-heads sorry, car culturalists, hooning around a track in a fast car, like a watered-down version of Top Gear but without the Clarkson. Or the Hammond. Or Captain Slow…. Sad to say it, and hard to believe, but Roger Walker just wasn’t bonkers enough. But back to the sub £100K house show – can anybody update me on how this apparent ignoring of the rules of building comes about? Have the poms actually got rid of their rules in total? Do they have licensed building practitioners for design? Or for construction? Or not? Is it because they all seem to be home builders? Has anyone of our readers got any advice about having been a home/self builder themselves, or having worked with someone in that way in New Zealand? Have any of you been home owner builders in recent times? Unqualified designers? Unqualified disasters? Please do tell – I’d be interested to know…

    • Drilling the Alpine Fault
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Victoria University of Wellington scientists are part of an international science team that could help to predict future earthquakes.

    • Back to Bloomsbury and serving Salinger – biography picks for August
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • This month we are on another literary jaunt. We take another look at Virginia Woolf, quite literally this time as this book focuses on the importance of painting in her life and its place in the cultural and intellectual life of Bloomsbury. This is a beautiful book and one which will find a home on many bookshelves. But you can get it from us for free!! Another landmark on the literary front is the publication of Joanna Rakoff’s recollection of her year spent as a literary agent for J.D. Salinger. Unable to send out the standard response letter she is quickly enmeshed in correspondence with his many devoted and often troubled fans. This is a memoir with a difference and has made a huge impact all around the world. Other books making up this month’s mix are the adventures of two graduate women friends, the story of an unlikely outback romance, an Englishman recalling his life in the nineteen fifties, which were not so dull after all and two memoirs of dislocated individuals. Virginia Woolf : art, life and vision / Frances Spalding. “”Words are an impure medium… better far to have been born into the silent kingdom of paint” – Virginia Woolf. Virginia Woolf’s many novels, notably Night and Day (1919), Jacob’s Room (1922), Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and The Waves (1931), transformed ideas about structure, plot and characterisation. The third child of Leslie and Julia Stephen, and sister of Vanessa (later Bell), Woolf was a central figure in the Bloomsbury Group: that union of friends who revolutionised British culture with their innovative approach to art, design and society.” (Drawn from Global Books summary). Love in the outback / Deb Hunt. “The true story of an unlikely romance in the Australian outback. At forty-nine, Deb Hunt stopped dating men. It was just too painful. The men she loved didn’t love her back. When she found herself stalking her last boyfriend, who’d become engaged to another woman, Deb knew it was time to make changes. From her home in the UK, she applied for a job in Australia – a PR assistant with the Royal Flying Doctor Service. She packed up her London home, said goodbye to everything that was familiar, and headed down under. There she encountered a land she never imagined and met a man unlike any other – a Royal Flying Doctor Service legend” (Drawn from Global Books  summary) My Salinger year / Joanna Rakoff. “1996. Joanna Rakoff takes a job at one of New York’s oldest literary agencies. On her first day, her boss gives her a stern talk about someone named ‘Jerry’. She is never to give out Jerry’s address or phone number, or talk to reporters about Jerry, or to call him with questions. It is only then she notices an entire wall of books containing myriad editions of the works of J.D. Salinger. Filled with titanic personalities and legendary authors, ‘My Salinger Year’ is a vivid, funny and charming coming of age story about a young woman trying to find her feet, and her voice” (Drawn from Global Books) Running away from home : finding a new life in Paris, London and beyond / Jane de Teliga. “Jane de Teliga had it all – a glamorous and fulfilling career as style director for Australian Vogue, a happy family life and a beautiful home in Sydney’s stunning eastern suburbs. But when empty nest syndrome struck, she suddenly found herself wondering what it all meant.” (Library catalogue) Graduates in wonderland : the international misadventures of two (almost) adults / Jessica Pan and Rachel Kapelke-Dale. “In 2007, with degrees from Brown in hand, good friends Pan and Kapelke-Dale decide to travel and commit to send each other lively, funny weekly emails about their highs and lows during their three years of globe-trotting. Pan jets off to China, making Beijing her new home where she intends to learn Mandarin and get a toehold in journalism. She fumbles her way through romances as well as well as jobs, and tries to figure out a culture where Facebook and YouTube are banned. Pan conveys everything honestly, despite knowing the government is reading her emails. Kapelke-Dale lands in New York and also grapples with being out of the cocoon of college” (Publisher Weekly). An encyclopedia of myself / Jonathan Meades. “The 1950s are not grey, not in Jonathan Meades’s detailed, petit-point memoir, where they are luridly polychromatic. They were peopled by embittered grotesques, bogus majors, reckless bohos, pompous boors, suicides. Death went dogging everywhere. Salisbury, where he was brought up, had two industries: God and the Cold War, both of which provided a cast of adults for the child to scrutinise with wonder and fear.” (Global Books) Devotion and defiance : my journey in love, faith and politics / Humaira Awais Shahid with Kelly Horan. “In this warm and intimate memoir, Humaira Awais Shahid tells her inspiring story. A bookish young woman who identified with the independent-minded heroines of Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf, she never dreamed that love would lead her to become the most prominent Muslim woman activist and legislator for women’s rights in Pakistan. After falling for the son of a prominent newspaper family, Shahid joined the family business. She soon revamped the insipid “women’s pages” of one of Pakistan’s leading newspapers into a crusading force for exposing the abuses suffered by Pakistani women.” (Publisher description) Hope Street, Jerusalem / Irris Makler. “Makler (Our Woman in Kabul) describes life as a journalist based in Jerusalem where she lived for seven years in this far-reaching but uneven memoir. Having filed stories around the globe for radio, TV and online news outlets, she knows the physical and emotional perils of working as foreign correspondent in in a post-9/11 world. She describes the personal tolls and the inherent loneliness of juggling her career and new life abroad, “Too many drivers, not enough friends. That was my verdict. as I slung my suitcases into the boot of yet another cab, in yet another dangerous location.” Despite these hardships, the author seldom tires of the setting. In evocative prose, she celebrates the unique qualities of the Old City.” (Publisher Weekly) Other people’s countries : a journey into memory / Patrick McGuinness. “Disarming, eloquent and illuminating, this meditation on place, time and memory, could only have been written by a poet, or a novelist, or a professor. Happily, Patrick McGuinness is all three, and ‘Other People’s Countries’ is a piece of lyrical writing, rich in narrative and character – full of fresh ways of looking at how we grow up, how we start to make sense of the world. This book evolved out of stories the author told his children: stories about the Belgian border town of Bouillon, where his mother came from, and where he has been going three times a year since he was a child – first with his parents and now with his son and daughter.” (Global Books) And two good ones you might have missed: Love, Nina : despatches from family life / Nina Stibbe. “In the 1980s Nina Stibbe wrote letters home to her sister in Leicester describing her trials and triumphs as a nanny to a London family. There’s a cat nobody likes, a visiting dog called Ted Hughes (Ted for short) and suppertime visits from a local playwright. Not to mention the two boys, their favourite football teams, and rude words, a very broad-minded mother and assorted nice chairs.From the mystery of the unpaid milk bill and the avoidance of nuclear war to mealtime discussions on pie filler, the greats of English literature, swearing in German and sexually transmitted diseases, Love, Nina is a wonderful celebration of bad food, good company and the relative merits of Thomas Hardy and Enid Blyton” (Syndetics review) Freud ego / Clement Freud. “In this autobiography, Sir Clement Freud comes clean about his feelings on being the grandson of the father of psychiatry, the brother of artist Lucien Freud, his early life as a spy, jockey and observer at the Nuremberg trials; and he shares his opinions in a range of subjects.” (Syndetics summary)

    • Gold Rush for Wellington Players in veteran events at Manawatu Open
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • Ian Talbot won 4 golds and 1 silver medal, and Lindsay Ward 3 golds and 1 silver medal at the tournament on Sunday, 6 July. Lindsay Ward won the Over 40 Singles against Ireland Over 50 Representative and former Wellington player Keld Jaksland 3-2 (11-6 11-8 8-11 6-11 11-3) and the Over 50 Singles against […]

    • 2014 South Island Individual Championships
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • Is coming soon (entries close this Friday 6pm): Entry Form: here. – Table Tennis Southland Timetable Saturday 23 August 8.30am     Singles – U13, U18, B Grade, D Grade, O50, Saturday 23 August 10.00am     Doubles – U13, U18, B Grade, D Grade, O50 Saturday 23 August 2.00pm     Singles – Under 15, Open, C […]

    • Lot Eight Oils – Harvesting perfection
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Wellington on a Plate
      • Lot Eight is a producer of some of the finest extra virgin and cold pressed fragrant olive oils to come out of New Zealand. Based in Martinborough, an ideal growing region for many olive varieties, Lot Eight is a staple in many chefs’ pantries around the Wellington region and beyond. Nalini Baruch, award winning oil maker, is committed to sustainable farming methods and to producing natural, preservative free and wholesome products. Lot Eight oils feature in a range of this year’s Visa Wellington On a Plate DINE Menus including Café Medici in Martinborough. To kick off week two of the 2014 Powershop Wellington Bake Club, we chatted to co-owner and oil maker Nalini about her amazing range of olive oils and favourite Wellington culinary delights. What inspired you to get into this business? The love of olives – a fruit, that bitten into fresh off the tree can remove the insides of your mouth and yet hours after being pressed transforms into a thing of gastronomic delight. What is your Lot Eight standout product? Citrus Olive Oil – as with all our oils, the citrus is cold pressed. It is made using New Zealand’s finest citrus pressed with our Barnea olives. A favourite with chefs and no matter how much extra we press each year, it sells out within the season. What is your favourite recipe featuring your Lot Eight products? Slow roasted organic chicken thighs (with skin on) where the chicken is coated in lashings of Lot Eight Oil Maker’s Blend, paprika, salt and pepper and adorned with garlic cloves (whole bulb, separated and skin on), bay leaves, oregano and slices of lemon. Baked in a moderate oven for an hour and served with skordalia (made with Lot Eight Citrus Olive Oil) and a light ‘Prana’ green salad. Tell us about your biggest baking disaster Pouring a cake mix into an unlined loose bottom cake tin and leaving it in a hot oven unchecked for 20 minutes. The mixture oozed out of the bottom of the tin and all over the oven rack and the base of the oven. When I opened the oven, black smoke poured out! Ten years ago, what were you doing? Debating between practicing law full time and giving Lot Eight more time. Lot Eight won, not that I gave up the law! What is your favourite thing about the Powershop Wellington Bake Club? That it is open to anyone interested in and brave enough to enter the competition and we get to discover a talented local baker. What other Wellington culinary delights do you pair with your Lot Eight oils? Oh so many – I shop at Moore Wilson’s, Ontrays and local food outlets. Just about anything I buy can be matched with Lot Eight oils or marinated olives but some of my treats are: - Thinly sliced fresh snapper (Yellow Brick Road) drizzled with Lot Eight Citrus Olive Oil, Japanese soya sauce and mirin. Served with a glass of any of Wellington’s fruity craft beer. - Zany Zeus creamy feta with dressing made with lashings of Lot Eight Reserve Olive Oil, squish of lemon, lemon rind, a smidgen of crushed garlic, sumac, salt and Italian parsley to taste. Served with French Baker’s ciabatta (Greytown) and paired with a glass of Hardie Boys Dry Ginger Beer or a local Riesling. - Organic local chicken, coated liberally in homemade fiery hot fresh masala paste using Lot Eight Harissa Olive Oil and left to marinate overnight in the fridge. Bring to room temperature before cooking on a BBQ or in a 400 degree pizza oven. Serve with spicy potatoes (dressed with the Harissa Olive Oil, freshly ground roasted cumin and coriander seeds), lightly whipped yogurt and garnished with ‘Prana’ micro herbs. What is your go-to baked treat? Rick Stein’s Orange Cake drizzled with reduced orange sauce made with freshly squeezed orange juice, caster sugar, Lot Eight Aromatic Olive Oil and the rind of a lime. Serve with a tangy yogurt or plain yogurt with a teaspoon of fresh lime juice. Heaven. Check out the great range of Lot Eight products here and follow the latest harvest on Facebook or Twitter. Images courtesy of Qingster Photography       The post Lot Eight Oils – Harvesting perfection appeared first on Visa Wellington on a Plate.

    • Welcome to Baby Smith!
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Andrea (Harakeke teacher) and husband Bruce are thrilled to introduce Oliver (Ollie) Rex Smith. Ollie was born at 9:05pm on Tuesday 29th July, weighing 9lb, 6.5 oz - a big boy, long body with a decent head (37cms) with dark, thick hair!   Many congratulations and best wishes to all three of them.

    • Wellington City Council Bi-Annual Survey Results
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • Here are the results of the latest survey on Wellington City Council and Councillors. We see a major support for two Councillors as Mayor, traffic congestion raising it’s head as a major issue, the best (and worst) City Councillors according to you, and a range of other trends. Now some caveats and things you need to know, I told you it was going to be unscientific. Firstly, we forgot to put Simon Woolf into the survey. We’ve apologised to him and he took up our offer of a blog spot, which you can read here. We also didn’t include the current Mayor in the question, who would you vote for as Mayor, this was deliberate. We wanted to see who out of the Councillors you would elect as Mayor. Finally, the total number of responses was several hundred, but less than a thousand, and it was distributed via all the usual Social Media avenues along with various lobby groups from different persuasions, so we hope it canvasses different views. Not all questions were the same, we deleted a couple and added some new ones. Anyway, on with the show. Do you think the Mayor has done a good job for Wellington City? 74% of you in our last survey thought that the Mayor had not done a great job for the city, however in this latest survey the Mayor moves to 58% no. So while you still generally think no, the Mayor is moving in the right direction. Do you think the Councilors have done a good job for Wellington City? In the previous survey 75% of you thought the Councillors had done a poor job. However, latest survey results show that only 45% of you thought the Council was doing a poor job. A significant shift for the better. Do you think that the Council listens to the residents? 70% of you thought that the Council just didn’t listen to you in the last poll. That has improved significantly again, with now only 46% of you thinking that the Council does not listen. A trend in the right direction. Do you understand the Council’s Public Consultation Process? This was a new question this time around and the results were: 42% yes, 30% no, and 28% of you responded “what consultation process?” Best and worst performing Councillors New data given we have new Councillors In the best category… And in the worst category… If you voted today on the current crop of Councillors for Mayor, then you’d pick Nicola Young by a comfortable majority. Do you support the runway extension? 63% of you do, 21% of you don’t, and 15% of you don’t know. Do you support the basin flyover? 51% of you didn’t, 40% of you did, and 9% of you didn’t know. How effective is the local government at solving problems in Wellington City? This remained very similar to the last poll results. Congestion You think that congestion has got worse, significantly so, as the 2013 and most recent poll results show. 2013 Poll Result 2014 Poll Result Other results: The amount of you that were proud to live in Wellington City dropped, by an average of 15% The amount of you that thought that Wellington was a safe city increased, by an average of 15% We thought that Wellington’s sense of community was about the same. The number of you who are staying for the long term remained at 97% (being a year or greater). What changes would most improve Wellington City? A lot of themes came through with the highlights (being the most frequently repeated) changes being: The airport extension More cycle lanes More jobs Fixing the increasing congestion Better parking Better public transport Better consultation Introducing more transparency including “scoring Councillors publicly” on their performance (there were a lot of responses to this effect). What is the one issue that you want to see the Council resolve? From top to bottom in order of most importance (the number of times mentioned) your issues that you want to see resolved are: Reduce traffic congestion Better public transport Better cycle access Better consultation process A more pragmatic approach to earthquake strengthening Economic (and job) growth Nothing new there… Thanks to everyone who responded.    

    • Wellington's Alternative Music Scene - The People's Coalition
      • 30 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      • GENTLE SHAKEDOWN I was stopped by the bros of The People’s Coalition this morning in Island Bay Village Centre, midway between coffee and mushrooms on toast at the Blue Belle and shopping for some stir fry lamb at the IB Butchery. I resisted buying an album but I did promise to try to raise their profile by posting an article about them online. So this is it – duty done. You can find out more about them and ‘what’s on’ in their slice of the alternative music scene here in Wellington at: https://www.facebook.com/ThePeoplesCoalition And here are some videos to get you moving while chilling on the landscapes of Paradise Postponed, mulling some associated Revolutionary Endeavours and enjoying Good Music:  

    • Triple the national cycling budget
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Cycling in Wellington
      • The Ministry of Transport is calling for comment on its Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport. Despite clear evidence that more people would walk and cycle if safe infrastructure was available, the plan proposes to spend under 1% of the budget on walking and cycling. Cyclists are mounting a campaign to triple the budget for cycling, from $15-30 million per year to $45-90 million per year for the next 3 years with progressive increases after that. You can write a submission yourself, and email it to GPS.2015@transport.govt.nz Even easier, you can make an online submission at http://www.onyerbike.kiwi/ - the outline of the submission has been done for you, and you can add a local example of a project you’d like to be funded – Wellingtonians might want to mention fixing the Ngauranga-Petone gap!

    • FREE first home buyers seminar
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Rainey Collins lawyers
      • November 20, 201412:00 pmto1:00 pmAt Rainey Collins we can guide you through the home buying process.  Take advantage of our FREE first home buyers seminar. To register your attendance please enter your details below and submit or contact Gillian Scanlon on (04) 473 6850 or gscanlon@raineycollins.co.nz FHB Seminar - 20 November 2014 Your Name (required) Occupation Email Address (valid email required) Contact Phone Number (required) Postal Address Postal Address   One%20moment%20please..."/> Please%20fill%20in%20all%20the%20required%20fields."/> Please%20double-check%20your%20verification%20code."/> cforms contact form by delicious:days  

    • Research reveals unsustainability of America’s workplaces
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • The research of a Victoria University of Wellington lecturer who shadowed truck drivers, Wall Street traders and unemployed workers in the United States for several months, reveals the precarious nature of America’s workforce. 

    • Notice of AGM and call for Nominations
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Raumati Swimming Club
      • Dear Members Notice is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting of the Raumati Swimming Club. Date:                     Tuesday 19st August 2014 Time:                     7pm Place                     Kapiti Community Centre 15 Ngahina St , Paraparaumu   In accordance to the current Constitution, I am requesting nominations for positions on the 2013/2014 Raumati Swimming Club Committee, however with theRead More... The post Notice of AGM and call for Nominations appeared first on Raumati Swimming Club.

    • Keith Johnson’s Australasian Bestiary – the Drop Bear
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Keith Johnson
      •  THE DROP BEAR   ONE day young Elsie Randle Cooled off at Swaggie's Run, Her bra straps and her girdle There flashing in the sun. 'Twas New Year's Eve, and slowly Across the ridges low The sad Old Year was drifting To where the old years go.   The New Chum's mind reviewing The Facebook pages of her life — Her love for Pommy Breeding Ere she became an Aussie wife; She sorrowed for the sorrows Of a heart not nobly won, And she pined that she was trouble Out there on Swaggie's Run.   The sapling shades had lengthened, The summer day was late, As Elsie quickly hastened Beyond the homestead gate. And if the hand of trouble Can leave a lasting trace, The lines of care had come to stay On poor sweet Elsie's face.   She walked among the gum trees As the shadows gathered there Lost in thought of Brucie Humphries Whose manners drove her spare. And great black clouds of menace On Bush and Creek descended ‘No gent will ever show his face ‘Where politesse has ended’.   Then a Drop Bear’s rude descent Knocked poor Elsie flat – It heard her Pommy Accent And couldn’t stomach that. Lord save her from that hell I beg in girlhood's name! For if it gives a vampire kiss, That ends the bleedin’ game.   Could England or its sisters Hold up their heads again, To face the Outback’s malice Or claim the love of men? And if it plants a smacker It were better were she dead - As then its fangs retracted Its premolars glowed bright red.   Just then up came the Squatter Riding on his thoroughbred He saw the maiden in distress And this is what he said: ‘Relieve yourself young lady And rub it on your head'. And so young Elsie sprang a leak To shake the Drop Bear dread.   The sad Australian sunset Had faded from the west; But night brings darker shadows To hearts that cannot rest; And Bruce the Cocky sits rocking And moaning in his chair. ‘I cannot bear disgrace,’ he moaned; ‘Disgrace I cannot bear.   ‘In hardship and in trouble ‘I struggled year by year ‘To make my homestead better ‘Than other Bush Runs here. ‘And now my girl’s a squatter’s sheila ‘How can I show my face? ‘I’ve nothing left but Mutt the Heeler, ‘And a slip rail bough-shed place!   ‘Ah, God in Heaven pardon! ‘I'm selfish in my woe — ‘My girl is better set now ‘Than many that I know'.   But Elsie on her big verandah Rocked and pondered her relief - She thought of Brucie only now And missed the Vegemite between his teeth And ere a New Year's dawning They set up home at last; And this is but a story Of woes now long since past!    SEE: http://australianmuseum.net.au/Drop-Bear

    • Fiction newsletter for July
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Welcome to the Fiction newsletter for the end of July. We are now half way through the year with another five months of new fiction to look forward to. As you will see with this month’s selection we have added some great fiction to our collection. Some entertaining reading is guaranteed to be discovered that will help fill the winter days still ahead. Library News We now have Zinio eMagazines An evening with American supense/crime writer Karin Slaughter – 12 August Contemporary fiction This month’s selection of new Contemporary Fiction offers some great reading, and an amazing choice, no matter what your reading preference happens to be. Highly recommended is All I have in this world by Michael Parker. The bird skinner : a novel / Alice Greenway. “Jim Kennoway, embittered and frequently drunk, has retreated to his house on the Maine coast, still recuperating from his recent leg amputation. Once a renowned ornithologist, he is brought ever lower by his painful memories: of his bloody stint in naval intelligence in the Solomon Islands; of his great love affair with his wife, Helen, which ended tragically; and of his youthful escapades exploring the forest, which marked him as odd but also gave him his life’s calling. Now he has been chosen to host the daughter of an islander who was once his scout. He only wants to be left alone, but the tall, beautiful young woman called Cadillac brings with her high spirits and a similar appreciation for their natural surroundings.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Tigerman / Nick Harkaway. “Lester Ferris, sergeant of the British Army, is a good man in need of a rest. He’s spent a lot of his life being shot at, and Afghanistan was the last stop on his road to exhaustion. He has no family, he’s nearly forty and burned out and about to be retired. The island of Mancreu is the ideal place for Lester to serve out his time. It’s a former British colony in legal limbo, soon to be destroyed because of its very special version of toxic pollution, a down-at-heel, mildly larcenous backwater. Of course, that also makes Mancreu perfect for shady business, hence the Black Fleet of illicit ships lurking in the bay: listening stations, offshore hospitals, and money laundering operations, drug factories and deniable torture centres. None of which should be a problem, because Lester’s brief is to sit tight and turn a blind eye. But Lester Ferris has made a friend: a brilliant, Internet-addled street kid with a comic book fixation who will need a home when the island dies and who might, Lester hopes, become an adopted son. Now, as Mancreu’s small society tumbles into violence, the boy needs Lester to be more than just an observer.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) All I have in this world : a novel / Michael Parker. “Two strangers meet over the hood of a used car in Texas: Marcus, who is fleeing both his financial and personal failures; and Maria, who after years of dodging her mistakes has returned to her hometown to make amends. One looking forward, the other looking back, they face off over the car they both want and think they need: a low-slung sky-blue 1984 Buick Electra. The car, too, has seen its share of failures. Each dent and ripped seam represents a pivotal moment in the lives of others. After knowing each other for less than an hour, Marcus and Maria decide to buy the Buick together. As this surprising novel follows the rocky paths of the Electra and its owners, both past and present, these two strangers form an unexpected and ultimately resilient alliance.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more Graphic novels As always there is a wide range of story lines and artistic styles with the Graphic Novels added to the collection this month. Highly recommended is Red Light Properties: previously-haunted real estate by Dan Goldman. Red Light Properties : previously-haunted real estate. 01 / written & realized by Dan Goldman. “Jude, certified phenomenologist, with Cecilia, licensed real estate broker, run the Miami-based paranormal exorcisms real estate business Red Light Properties and have come to an impasse rooted in misunderstanding and distrust; it could mean the end. Cecilia can’t connect to Jude and doesn’t understand his almost violent experiences with death and his viewpoint of the magic of life. With honesty built from their love and flaws, can Jude and Cecilia move forward, save their marriage and family, and develop their business to its fullest potential.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Mr Unpronounceable adventures / Tim Molloy. “Welcome to The City Of The Ever Open Eye, a dream world metropolis of surreal wonder and dark nightmare. Nestled between the scorched wastes of The Endless Plain and the rolling expanse of The Hundred Year Ocean stands The City, eternal and yet ever changing. Through its labyrinthine alleys and dusty plazas stumbles Mr Unpronounceable, seeker of secrets, a homeless necromancer, madman, sweating and delirious, moving from one horrifically comedic nightmare to the next.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Couch tag / Jesse Reklaw. “In this looping and circular five part autobiography about his family, youth, and early career, the author takes the mundane and gives it a part-comic, part-tragic twist.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more Mysteries New mystery fiction includes the latest novel by Karin Slaughter titled Cop Town. Karin will be in conversation at Central Library on Tuesday evening 12th August at 6.00pm. This is a free event so please join us for a great evening. Lonely graves / Britta Bolt. “A suicide, a drowned man, or a sudden death. It’s all in a day’s work for Pieter Posthumus. In Amsterdam, the Lonely Funerals team exists to make sure that no one goes to the grave unmourned. Posthumus takes that responsibility seriously.A careful, humane man, he works hard to find out all he can about the anonymous or abandoned dead entrusted to his care. So when a young Moroccan immigrant is found in the Prinsengracht canal in suspicious circumstances, Posthumus cannot let it go. The police may call it accident or suicide; he is sure there’s more to it. He takes up the case, an investigation that leads to him getting caught up in a terror plot and in the way of an elite police unit.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Red light / Graham Masterton. “Somewhere in the city of Cork, a woman’s cry echoes through the rainy streets. On a bloodstained mattress in a grimy flat, a burly man lies dead. A terrified girl kneels over his body. She is half-naked, starving, screaming. She has been trapped here for three days. It doesn’t take DS Katie Maguire long to identify the murder victim. He is someone she has been trying to convict for years, a cruel and powerful pimp who terrorised the girls who worked for him. It’s Katie’s job to catch the killer. But with men like this dead, the city is safer and so are the scared young women who are trafficked into Cork. When a second pimp is horrifically murdered, Katie must decide. Should she do her job, or follow her conscience? Should she allow the killer to strike again?” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Cop Town : a novel / Karin Slaughter. “It’s 1974 Atlanta, and another policeman has been shot by the man they’re calling the Shooter, yet his partner, Jimmy Lawson, is left physically unharmed but devastated. Jimmy’s sister Maggie, also a cop, is convinced that something is off about Jimmy’s version of events, but getting anyone to listen to her suspicions would only prove futile. After all, women weren’t very welcome on the police force in 1974 and they certainly didn’t investigate serious crimes. When she’s partnered with Kate Murphy, whose pampered background couldn’t be more different from Maggie’s solid blue-collar roots, events begin to escalate, and Kate and Maggie must put everything on the line to stop a ferocious killer.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more Science fiction/fantasy The new Ben Nova novel titled, Transhuman comes highly recommended in this month’s new Science Fiction and Fantasy novels. Transhuman / Ben Bova. “Iconoclastic cellular biologist Luke Abramson is determined to save his dying eight-year-old granddaughter, Angela, with his cutting-edge treatment for cancer. Inconveniently, his process is not yet approved for use on humans, and he’s stymied by the objections of Angela’s parents. When Luke and Angela vanish, FBI special agent Jerry Hightower is assigned to recover them. While Luke’s allies are manipulating him to gain control of his revolutionary treatments and the profit they promise, his enemies will go to great lengths to keep the life-extension genie in its bottle. Luke has more immediate concerns: the side effects of the treatments that he has inflicted on himself and his helpless granddaughter are progressive and potentially lethal.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) In dark service / Stephen Hunt. “Jacob Carnehan has settled down and is going out of his mind with boredom. He’s longing for an opportunity to escape, and test himself against whatever the world has to offer. Carter is going to get his opportunity. He’s caught up in a village fight, kidnapped by slavers and, before he knows it, is swept to another land. A lowly slave, surrounded by technology he doesn’t understand, his wish has come true: it’s him vs. the world.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The echo / James Smythe. “Set primarily in the depths of space, the second novel in Smythe’s Anomaly Quartet (after The Explorer) picks up 23 years after the disappearance of spaceship Ishiguro as identical twins Mira and Tomas Hyvonen are put in charge of the latest expedition to outer space. As Mira leads a team to the anomaly, Tomas is left behind to run the mission from Earth, and subtle resentment beings to build between the brothers as a result of their various roles. Yet just when the spaceship reaches the anomaly, the mission begins to go off the rails. Mira must battle with his desire to learn about the anomaly, save his crew, and please those on Earth who funded the mission, all the while trying to get back alive.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary Read more Other genres New translated fiction features this month in our “Other Genre” category. Highly recommended is The People in the Photo by Helene Gestern, winner of more than fifteen awards in France. The people in the photo / Hélène Gestern ; translated from the French by Emily Boyce and Ros Schwartz. ” This remarkable debut novel begins with a photo of Parisian archivist Helene’s mother, Natasha, taken in 1971, a year before Natasha died. It includes two men Helene has never seen before. She advertises for anyone knowing the identity of either of the men in the photo, and she connects with Stephane, whose father is one of the men. The story develops that Helene was only four when her mother died, and her father and stepmother will tell her nothing about Natasha, not even how she died. Stephane’s father became seriously depressed, and his parents’ marriage became very bitter after 1971, so he has something at stake in this also. While the mystery surrounding Natasha unfolds, so does the deepening relationship between Helene and Stephane.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Summer house with swimming pool : a novel / Herman Koch ; translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett. “Dr. Marc Schlosser, whose practice includes a new patient, veteran TV and stage actor Ralph Meier. At a party, Marc doesn’t like the way Ralph looks at his wife, Caroline. So when Marc and his family are invited to spend part of their vacation at Ralph’s summer house (with swimming pool), Marc reluctantly accepts. There, his family mingles with Ralph’s family, as well as houseguests Stanley Forbes, a film director, and his much younger girlfriend. The air is rife with sexual tension as Ralph showers too much attention on Marc’s underage daughter, Julia, and Marc toys with having an affair with Ralph’s wife, Judith. Then tragedy strikes. One year later, through a confluence of events, Ralph is dead and Marc is implicated. Over the course of the novel, the truth about what really happened that summer is revealed.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Talking to ourselves / Andrâes Neuman ; translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia. “Lito is ten years old and is almost sure he can change the weather when he concentrates very hard. His father, Mario, anxious to create a memory that will last for his son’s lifetime, takes him on a road trip in a truck called Pedro. But Lito doesn’t know that this might be their last trip: Mario is seriously ill. Together, father and son embark on travels that take them through strange geographies, ones that seem to unite the borders of Spanish-speaking world. In the meantime, Lito’s mother Elena looks for support in books, undertaking an adventure of her own that will challenge her moral limits. The narratives of father, mother, and son each embody one of the different ways that we talk to ourselves: through thought, speech, and writing. While neither of them dares to tell the complete truth to the other two, their solitary voices nonetheless form a poignant conversation. “(Adapted from Syndetics summary) Read more

    • Govt fudging figures over Transmission Gully - Green Party media release
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • The government is fudging the figures over Wellington road project, Transmission Gully, the Green Party said today. The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) said today it had let the contract to a Public Private Partnership (PPP) for "a net present cost of $850 million". "The Government needs to come clean. In fact, the cost is $125 million per year for 25 years, so the total cost is over $3.13 billion for 27 kilometres, which works out at over $115 million per kilometre," Green Party spokesperson Julie Anne Genter said. "NZTA says the contract cost $25 million less than it would cost through conventional means, but it spent over $30 million just on the contracting process. "The PPP is not a way of saving money, it is a way of hiding an expensive loan using the private sector. "This project will be designed, constructed and maintained by private interests and these are largely foreign interests. "Japan's Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, will be the lead financier of the PPP while Australian firm Leighton Contractors will also play a lead role. "Public-Private Partnerships are supposedly about getting value for money but, once again, we see they are in fact cash cows for financiers, lawyers, and foreign companies while taxpayers foot the bill. "All up, Transmission Gully is expected to deliver only $360-$500 million worth of benefits. The opportunity cost is the billions we will not be spending on smart, green alternatives that would have made it easier for people to get around, and urgent safety upgrades to roads that are used by more people every day," Ms Genter said.

    • New Zealand: Local Government, DIA ICT Services, Smart Cities and the coming Data Flood #internetofthings #ALGIMIMR
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • strathmorepark
      • I spent the morning with the Association of Local Government Information Management (ALGIM) at their conference in Palmerston North. They had a huge range of topics on their agenda for the two days and I spoke on where I thought the Government Common Capability (ICT) Services were at, the incoming Data Flood as a result of the Smart and Sensing City movement, and the challenges that the local Councils are likely to face as a result. Local Government sits at the middle of a maelstrom of incoming data, they may not see it yet, but as the rise of sensors and the Internet of Things begins, they are going to face huge challenges in how to manage that data while making it open to the entire world. ALGIM Presentation  

    • Who are the “Folding Goldies”?
      • 29 Jul 2014
      • Cycling in Wellington
      • Are you over 65? Do you have a folding bike? Did you know that this means you can enhance your bike rides by using off peak public transport for free (Thanks, Winston and the NZ taxpayer). If you have a Gold Card you can travel for free on public transport in the Wellington Region between 9am and 3pm, after 6:30pm and at weekends.   If you have a folding bike, you can take it on trains, buses and ferries without the limitations imposed on standard bikes. Folding Goldies are a group of people with Gold Cards and folding bikes, who organise occasional rides in the Wellington Region using public transport. On our inaugural ride, we took the train to Upper Hutt, then biked down the Hutt River Trail to lunch at a Petone Cafe. The next expedition, on 21 August, will involve the train to Waikanae and an exploration of the Kapiti Coastal Cycle Route. More details at the Folding Goldies website.

    • VUWSA Mid-Year Report Cards
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Salient
      • Sonya Clark President A Clark has been a highly effective and active president. Moving into the role from her 2013 position of Academic Vice-President, Clark had a great degree of institutional knowledge, which she has used to her – and students’ – advantage in negotiations with University management, as well as outside bodies. Clark’s reign has seen VUWSA return to the University Council and Academic Board, and the organisation has conducted several high-profile campaigns, with progress slowly but surely being made. Clark’s dedication to the future of VUWSA is noteworthy. She is committed to the strategic planning of the organisation and the University, and is highly involved with issues including student-levy increases, student-media modernisation and changes to qualifications at the University. Clark is visibly more confident in the role than at the beginning of the year. She is a very hard worker and commits much of herself to the role. She has retained good control of her Executive, demonstrating at Executive meetings that she is thoroughly in charge while maintaining good working relationships with those around her, which is no mean feat. She has also fostered and strengthened positive relationships with other student representative groups. By her own admission, time pressures have limited Clark’s interaction with the student body at large: the hiring of a new administrative support staff member will hopefully go some way to ameliorating this. Rick Zwaan Welfare Vice-President A Zwaan started the year at an advantage with a trimester as Welfare Vice-President already under his belt, having taken over midway through 2013 after the resignation of Simon Tapp. It is, then, perhaps unsurprising that Zwaan has proven himself to be the most dynamic and active member of the 2014 Executive. Zwaan’s knowledge and work ethic are evident in meetings of the VUWSA Executive, where he is a frequent and dominant contributor. He has a thorough understanding of the organisation, and a vision of where he believes VUWSA should go. He has been thoroughly involved in VUWSA’s key campaigns this year – Fairer Fares and Rental WoFs – and has been very visible through his work on VUWSA’s press releases as well as willingness to give comment. He has also been a visible presence at many VUWSA events around campus. This involvement is reflected in the 238.75 extra hours Zwaan worked last trimester. Zwaan received a generally glowing review from Salient last year, and the comment that he was “definitely staking his claim for a Presidential campaign in 2014.” Zwaan did not run for President last year, but is the obvious frontrunner for this year. Rāwinia Thompson Academic Vice-President A+ Thompson, only a second-year student, has worked shockingly hard at her job. She attends meeting after meeting: she sits on the Academic Board where she advocated strongly (and successfully) for the reintroduction of tutorials for 300-level arts subjects; she attends University Council meetings even though she doesn’t have a seat; she spoke at the Select Committee on the Bill which would cut compulsory student representation from the Uni Council. Most recently, she has expressed her concern at the way potentially triggering content is discussed in courses at the University. Thompson’s genuine concern for issues which affect students is very evident. She has gone above and beyond so far this year, working 145 hours more than she was paid for. BOLD: Declan Doherty–Ramsay Engagement Vice-President C+ New to the VUWSA Executive, Doherty–Ramsay is the Executive member with the most VUWSA-centric social-media presence, but this has not necessarily been reflected in his achievements. Doherty–Ramsay accepted this, citing the early resignation of Elizabeth Bing among contributory factors to his issues with the role, along with lack of institutional knowledge and lack of long-term vision. The Engagement Vice-President’s role includes running VUWSA events and works to improve links with students and the community. Doherty–Ramsay writes the weekly Salient column and has been involved in running VUWSA’s joint O-Week and Stress Free Study Week. However, he suffers from a serious case of over-promising and under-delivering. Jordan Lipski  Treasurer–Secretary B+ A quiet achiever, Lipski is highly reliable and very, very competent. As part of his dual treasurer–secretary role, it is Lipski’s responsibility to take minutes at Exec meetings. He takes detailed, accurate minutes, which are always ready the next day – a welcome change from previous years. This attention to detail is also integral to his role as treasurer. VUWSA’s budget was passed in May this year – considerably earlier than usual – with a deficit of $42,000. This was less than anticipated. The Executive have approved further spending since the Budget was passed, with Lipski’s support. Lipski is an active member of the Executive, though he is not vocal in most meetings. Much of Lipski’s role is behind the scenes: he is a member of the Auditing and Finance Committee, VUWSA Trust, Executive Reporting Committee and Publications Committee, and works at VUWSA events and the Pipitea office. He does not often voice opinions in meetings of the Executive, but is a solid worker. Caroline Thirsk Education Officer  B The outsider, Thirsk is as close as VUWSA has to a right-wing voice this year: coming from South Africa, she is not obviously politically aligned. Despite this status as a relative newcomer, Thirsk is forthright in meetings, and often brings a fresh perspective to discussions. As Education Officer, Thirsk is supposed to support the Academic Vice-President and VUWSA’s Education Team. As discussed, the Academic Vice-President has been very active this year, giving Thirsk a reasonably high workload. Her involvement and work have improved as her institutional knowledge have grown; Thirsk is clearly keen to progress. Alasdair Keating Campaigns Officer B–  Looking through past VUWSA reviews, it quickly becomes apparent that Campaigns Officers often find themselves sidelined when working with strong Welfare Vice-Presidents. This is true of Keating, whose contributions have been overshadowed by Zwaan’s exceptional output. Keating is a generally supportive Exec member, but has not independently displayed leadership. He has admitted that he could have done more in the first trimester and intends to do more this trimester. Stephanie Gregor Wellbeing and Sustainability Officer B Gregor’s role is a broad one, and she has worked alongside the Welfare Vice-President and Equity Officer as part of the Welfare Team. She has put in a reasonable amount of work, helping with various campaigns and working 81.75 surplus hours, but has by her own admission not taken a great deal of initiative, nor contributed a lot in Executive meetings. Gregor is another Executive member who started off with relatively little experience and knowledge, and has improved over the course of the year. Madeleine Ashton–Martyn Equity Officer A The Equity Officer role only came into existence in 2013, and combined several existing roles. Ashton–Martyn has admirably covered the diverse range of responsibilities she has had thus far this year. She was instrumental in organising the highly successful Let Me Go Home march, and has worked well with the many groups she seeks to represent. She takes initiative and often contributes in Exec meetings. Ashton–Martyn has demonstrated her commitment to the role, both in working 134.5 surplus hours over the first trimester and in the quality of those hours. Toby Cooper Clubs and Activities Officer A+ Cooper is super. Having started in the role later in the year after a successful by-election, Toby has re-energised his job as Clubs and Activities Officer. He has maintained a constant presence, attending clubs events and sending regular emails to clubs about what is happening at Vic. Toby is always there to offer advice and support. Cooper has spearheaded the Clubs Showcase in the Hub, a great way to increase the presence of Clubs. Perhaps what’s most impressive about Cooper is his constant enthusiasm and positivity. Every Executive needs an eager beaver who ignores the politics and gets stuck in to their role. Toby is that person.

    • Calling all musicians, WE WANT YOU! It’s audition time...
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Orchestra Wellington
      • Calling all musicians, WE WANT YOU!  It’s audition time again so take a look at the notice and head to our website for application forms & requirements or for more information contact auditions@orchestrawellington.co.nz

    • CONGRATULATIONS to Martin Stowers who WON our ‘WICKED...
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Orchestra Wellington
      • CONGRATULATIONS to Martin Stowers who WON our ‘WICKED WELLINGTON ADVENTURE - MUSICAL MAESTRO' Prize through Absolutely Positively Wellington! He will be conducting the orchestra at the dress rehearsals, and sitting in on stage with the performers at our next concert ‘SONG OF THE NIGHTINGALE’ Here he is pictured alongside head conductor and musical director Marc Taddei.  Follow his journey leading towards and on the BIG DAY on www.wicked.wellingtonnz.com and our blog www.orchestrawellington.co.nz/news Well done Martin!

    • Results – Sunday 27th July 2014
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Waikanae Golf Club
      • Weekend Men Round  1 of the Men’s Handicap Match Play was a closely contested affair, with the winning pairs having to produce quality play to advance past their rivals. Despite conditions being definitely on the cool side there was some very good scoring out there. The semi-finals, played Sunday 3rd August are: 1 8:45 a.m. PHILIP CARTHEW IAN TRIM CRAIG PHELPS STU MCLAREN   1 8:55 a.m. MATT HOBSON KELLY HOUGHTON DAVID MORETE CHRIS TURNER A fairly ‘juicy’ looking line-up of seasoned (…grizzled?) players coming off that Interclub season. The scene is set for two fine battles. Good luck to all competitors.  

    • Cross-cultural researcher made Honorary Fellow
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Professor Colleen Ward, founder and Co-Director of Victoria University’s Centre for Applied Cross-cultural Research, has been made an Honorary Fellow of the International Association of Cross-cultural Psychology (IACCP).

    • Noisy city living
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Eye of the Fish
      • Its not just residents living near the Establishment that thinks living in the city can be a noisy affair. I’m overjoyed to hear that residents in Seville have also had enough of noisy visitors milling and shouting in the streets below. They’ve just passed a law about it in Seville, according to the Guardian, and hooray for them. “It’s a balance between the right of residents to get a little rest and the development of economic activities,” city councillor Maximiliano Vílchez told reporters. “Locals have been urging the city to crack down on noise for years. In a petition last year, more than 4,000 residents asked, “Can you imagine what’s it’s like to have 100 people under your window screaming as they watch a football match? Our children can’t perform well at school. When we leave for work in the morning we’re already exhausted.” “The rules focus on the city’s hundreds of bars and cafes, where patrons regularly crowd outside. Anyone having an “excessively loud” conversation on the street now faces fines, as do bar owners who set up televisions on their terraces or who serve patrons who are standing up outside. Bartenders will no longer be able to roll beer kegs in the streets or drag chairs along the sidewalk when setting up or taking down their terraces. Fines for those caught engaging in banned behaviour range from €300 to €300,000. “Drivers were also targeted. Playing loud music while driving, having a car alarm that goes off for more than three minutes or revving car engines unnecessarily is now prohibited.” Near where I live, we have a number of noise sources. There are regular police and ambulance sirens at all hours of the day, and we can’t begrudge that. There is traffic noise, of course, and with a steady hum, that’s understandable and I can cope with that. But waste-collection trucks? Since the days of deregulation, we now have many different waste companies, and some of the nearby businesses and residents use one company, others use another, some still use the original city collection, etc, and all of them have different collection times. The Waste Management guys prefer a night time trip. Bottles are collected from bars after closing, at what feels like 2.00am. Street sweeping machines go for 3.00am. A recycling paper company always goes for the 4.00am slot. The City Council comes round at 6.00 or 7.00 in the morning. Others, presumably, come and collect through the day, when we are all at work. All this on top of bars that serve alcohol till past midnight, resulting in a steady stream of intoxicated, squealing girlies and incoherently grunting boys, badly coping with an excess of testosterone and alcohol, washing up and down the streets from between 9.00pm and 3.00am. I find that the best time for sleeping is at 7.00am, when ironically noise is at its lowest ebb – just early birds going to work, with a steady hum of regular traffic, no alcohol, no rubbish collection, and the prime reason why i am late to work. But let’s face it: Noise at Chateau Fish is a 24-hour affair. Without a doubt, un-controlled noise is the worst part of living in the city. New Zealand is fairly new to city living, and we are still finding our way about it, with rules and regulations. Other cities, especially in Europe, have been urban dwellers for centuries, and have already established firm rules for what is acceptable and what is not. I recall visiting a friend in Berlin a few years back, a renown party city, of which much of the city is intensely urban. As we were walking back through the city streets late one evening, talking and laughing, as you do after a few beers, an old haus-Frau opened up her shutters, yelled Germanic abuse at us, slammed her shutters again and the street was silent. We had broken the laws about noise in a public place. My friend explained that neighbors of his had summonsed the Polizei when he had inadvertently played music too loudly on a Sunday morning – they served him notice. It’s a serious offense in parts of Germany to make too much noise at inappropriate times. But in NZ, if you dare to complain, the letters to the paper are instantly telling any potential complainer that – “it’s your fault, you moved to the city, you’ve got no right to complain, if you don’t like it then move back to the suburbs.” Actually, that’s not a fair comment at all. We can have both urban dwelling, and decent quality of audible life, if some sensible rules are established, and the residents in Spain have started on the right track. We do need to establish some ground rules, in my humble opinion, between audible activities between midnight and six in the morning, at the very least. Preferably, for my part, I would do the following: - Ban leaf-blowers at all times, for ever. Stupid, pointless, noisy machines. Inventions of Beezlebub, the Devil’s spawn instruments of hell personified. Need I say more? - Bottle recycling collection – the sound of a thousand smashing bottles being poured into a metal body of a truck makes a noise not unlike a crashing jet-fighter, especially if you live nearby or above. Daytime hours only please. - Those amazing machines with giant steel prongs that take on large Euro-bins of rubbish or waste paper and lift them over their heads to empty? Satan’s grandchild as well. Incredible amount of noise, from wildly revving diesel engines, hydraulic motors, steel flaps banging and crashing, waste being emptied at a great height into an endless, mouthy maw. Clever machines, skilled drivers, but please ban them from the night. - Motorised street cleaners – powerful spinning brooms and suction motors clean the street well, but create hellish noise, yet because it is a constant hum, it is bearable. A six am start for them. - Drunken revellers singing incoherently on their way home? It should be lawful to use them for target practice, with a paint gun or high-powered water-cannon, although I’d prefer something stronger and more permanent. Perhaps a less homicidal way might be to simply muzzle them with a sock in their mouth and tape over their lips till they get home. Any candidate taking on these notions gets my vote this coming election. Vote for Peace and Quiet in the inner city!

    • BOT Meeting Agenda - Wednesday 30 July 2014
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • AGENDA1.       Attendance1.1.          Present1.2.          Apologies1.3.          Conflict of Interest 2.       Minutes of previous meeting: 14 May 20142.1.          Confirmation2.2.          Matters Arising2.3.          Action Table 3.       Education/Curriculum/Student Achievement focus3.1.         See review of Annual Goals below3.2.         Upcoming Hub Reviews3.3        Review of Progress in Writing 4.       Property: 4.1.          Playground development – discussion of ideas from consultation4.2.          Hall Report, term 2, 2014 5.       Self-review5.1.          Check- Annual Self – Review Programme 2014 (standing agenda item)5.2.          Policies to be reviewed:·         Community Partnering Document·         Religious Education·         Self Review·         Theft and Fraud·         Sensitive Expenditure·         Behaviour Management 5.3.        Governance for the 21st century – Oral presentation and discussion Part 2 6.       Health and Safety  6.1      Peer Mediation Training6.2      Ski Camp Approval 7.       Legislation7.1.          Recapitation: application and plan going forward7.2.          Investing in Educational Success – Update and discussion7.3.          Feed back re NZSTA AGM remits 8.       Personnel8.1       NZSTA Conference - report 9.       Charter Development9.1       Annual goals -  Six monthly report – oral presentation9.2       BOT Planning Day for 2015 - set date 10.   ICT 10.1      ALF (update and next modules)10.2      Sub-committee report 11.   Finance11.1.       Finance Report 11.2.       Financial Reports for June 2014 including Six-Monthly Budget Review11.3.       Expenditure approval 12.   Community Engagement12.1      Up-coming community activities 13.   Next meeting: 13.1.       Wednesday, 27 August, 2014

    • Winter Series: Just Words
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Capital Mosaic, Wellington
      • In our community many of us have grown up during the waking global conscience. We have learned to live with the heartbreak of brokenness, poverty, and slavery. We have heard the words of prophets asking us to care for the orphans and widows. We have even quoted Jesus’ words to care for the forgotten. Yet […]

    • Wellington Central Library Tour – 6 August 2014, 10.30 am –12 Noon
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • SeniorNet Wellington Inc
      • When: Wednesday, 6 August 2014, 10.30 am –12 Noon Where: Wellington Central Library, 65 Victoria Street, Wellington What: An opportunity for SeniorNet members to take a guided tour of the Central Library to learn of the diversity of resources and information. Surprise yourself! Understand what’s available on each floor. The tour will include:- a quick overview what is available at the Libraryobserving the catalogue area and seeing how it workson the first floor seeing what’s available and maybe try the computers and access online resourceson the second floor check out past papers, ancestry, etcasking questions at any time  Book early! The tour is limited to 10 people. Please register with Colin Archer ColinArcher@xtra.co.nz  Phone 478 6559. Advice of detailed arrangements will be sent to registrants prior to the tour. The Library tour is free to members.

    • New DVDs: Wellington City Libraries Ratings Project #2
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Why does it take so long for things to be released on DVD? Why are some TV shows not released here at all, even though they are available in Australia? Unfortunately New Zealand’s DVD zone is at the end of the release market for a lot of material and faced with such a small market, procedural costs often become prohibitive to warrant general release by an official distributor. We love TV shows at Wellington City Libraries, and we know you do too. Which is why we have initiated ‘The Ratings Project’, an ongoing mission to bring you the shows that you want to watch by submitting titles to the Film & Video Labelling Body for classification.  We’re aiming to give you the complete ‘TV’ experience, whether we provide you with full run of your favourite TV shows, or surprise you with something new & different. We hope you find something you enjoy and feel free to send us any feedback and suggestions. This month’s titles have a distinctly criminal bent: The Inspector Lynley mysteries. The complete series four. “The aristocratic Inspector Lynley and working-class Detective Sergeant Havers are a most improbable detective team with a definite knack for solving difficult crimes. Based on the Lynley and Havers characters from Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley Mysteries, this fourth Inspector Lynley Mysteries set begins where the third leaves off, just after Lynley and his wife Helen have separated following the loss of their baby and as Havers is returning to work after having been shot in the line of duty. “In Divine Proportion” finds the pair deep in the countryside where they must sort out a host of small-town relationships and piece together a string of seemingly disparate clues in order to bring two murderers to justice. Lynley and Havers are off on a brief holiday to visit Lynley’s mother Lady Asherton in “In the Guise of Death” when an apparent suicide in a neighboring stable draws Lynley back to work. Eventually, a smuggling ring that includes some most unexpected players is revealed. It seems that even the House of Lords is not immune to fraud and murder in “The Seed of Cunning,” but the question that haunts Lynley is whether its members are exempt from the legal ramifications of their actions. Lynley’s pursuit of justice without regard for protocol and self-restraint in the face of illegal immigrants, organ trading, and the search for an immensely valuable ancient Koran may quite possibly prove his downfall in “The Word of God.” These PBS Inspector Lynley Mysteries are suspenseful, thought-provoking, and thoroughly engaging…” (From Amazon.com review) Murdoch mysteries. Complete series 6. “Forensic sleuthing in the age of invention. Broadcast as The Artful Detective on Ovation. Based on novels by Maureen Jennings. At the dawn of the 20th century, Detective William Murdoch (Yannick Bisson, Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye) solves Toronto’s trickiest cases with scientific insight and ingenuity in this award-winning mystery series. From flying early aircraft to infiltrating nudist communities, consulting with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to helping a young Winston Churchill, Murdoch has always been a man ahead of his time. In Season 6, he also confronts legal and social challenges to be with his love, pathologist-turned-psychiatrist Dr. Julia Ogden (Gemini® winner Hélène Joy, Durham County). Meanwhile, Constable Crabtree (Jonny Harris, Hatching, Matching & Dispatching) gains confidence as a policeman and a suitor to fetching coroner Dr. Emily Grace (Georgina Reilly, The L.A. Complex)…” (Publishers description from Amazon.com) Silk. Series 2 / created by Peter Moffat. “As Martha (Maxine Peake) steps up to become a QC, Shoe Lane Chambers once again becomes the focus for drama and intrigue on the front line of criminal law… Martha Costello is incredibly young to have got silk, she is a brilliant and passionate barrister but now the stakes are higher than ever. Tensions are also running high in the chambers, with the still ambitious Clive Reader (Rupert Penry-Jones) having to deal with his failure to become a QC, and Billy Lamb under pressure to keep the chambers afloat. As Martha finds an ambiguous ally in Caroline Warwick, a 50-something, sharp as a stiletto QC, and Clive develops a fascination for a very beautiful and principled solicitor; passion, jealousy and ambition take hold both in and out of the courtroom…” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk) Dalziel & Pascoe. Series four. “Episode 1: On Beulah Height. With modernity raising its ugly head in Yorkshire, the grand idea of the Water Board was to flood a local valley to make a reservoir. Of course they had to bulldoze the homes of Dendale, the farming town inconveniently situated in that valley, first, and relocate the families. That was when the children began to disappear. Andy Dalziel was a young detective in those days, and he took the case hard. Three little girls were missing in all. No bodies were ever found, and the best suspect, a strange lad named Benny Lightfoot, was held for a time, then released. Twelve years later, with one of the driest summers on record, the ruins of Dendale have begun to reappear in the reservoir. And the child-snatching has started again. Dalziel, older, wiser, and more caustic, is determined to get his man this time. Episode 2: Recalled to Life. As Inspector Dalziel and partner Pascoe work unofficially to refute new evidence concerning a 1963 case, they threaten to unearth various nasty political secrets. Episode 3: Time to Go. The drugs-related death of young man who lapsed into a coma at a rave club attracts the interest of Dalziel (Warren Clarke) and Pascoe (‘Colin Buchanan’ ). As the detectives investigate deeper into the rave club they discover that the club is owned by Nicholas and Sophie, intense, inseparable twins and financed by their seemingly benign Uncle Henry (Bernard Cribbins), a maker of perfume. This bizarre trio cause problems enough for Dalziel but he then he comes under more pressure…” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk) Dalziel & Pascoe. Series five. “Episode 1: A Sweeter Lazarus. Having recovered from his wounds Andy Dalziel returns to the fold just as Peter Pascoe is in the midst of an undercover operation trying to capture a serial killer. Peter corners the man who then jumps to his death but the only witness turns out to be Abbie Hallingsworth who was kidnapped 19 years before and presumed dead. More difficult however is that her kidnapper, Gus Mullavey, confessed to her murder and is still in prison, though now on his deathbed… DNA testing confirms her identity but the police soon have a murder investigation on their hands when Abbie is found dead. When they learn that one-third of the Hallingsworths’ considerable family wealth was in trust for Abbie, they focus on Abbie’s brother David as the most likely suspect….Season 5, Episode 2: Cunning Old Fox. After Georgina Webster dies following a fall from her horse during a fox hunt, it’s put down to an accident. When the Master of the Hunt, James Marsham, receives an anonymous letter saying her death was a good thing, he asks the police to investigate. ACC Rebecca Fenning puts Dalziel in charge of the case and he would rather be doing almost anything else…” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk) Dalziel & Pascoe. Series eight. “Dinosaur Detective Superintendent Andy Dalziel and his cultured sidekick, DI Pascoe return to tackle four intriguing new murder mysteries set in the beautiful countryside and towns of Yorkshire. Cases include a complex investigation involving an escaped wife-murderer, secret affairs, hidden bodies and illegitimate children; and the death of a wealthy factory owner, blamed by his family on his Russian fiance. They may be total opposites, but their different skills complement one another, making them a crime-busting detective team second to none…” (Container description from Syndetics) Dalziel & Pascoe. Series nine. “Blunt-talking, politically-incorrect detective Andy Dalziel once again pairs up with his younger, fast-tracked side-kick, Inspector Peter Pascoe. Joining the team are one time tearaway, WPC ‘Janet’ Jackson and a young muslim, DC Parvez Lateef, as they investigate four more intriguing murder mysteries in the town of Wetherton and the beautiful Yorkshire countryside surrounding it…” (Container description from Syndetics) Hu$tle. Series six. “The smash hit show returns for a sixth series and the gang are back with more exciting, inventive, and very shady scams. If you have money to burn, you had better keep an eye on it. From cheap jewellery to the odd priceless painting, the team continues on their mission to right the wrongs of the country by punishing the corrupt and excessively wealthy for their lack of concern for others. It just so happens that the team makes some money along the way. In Series 6, Mickey (Adrian Lester: The Day After Tomorrow) finds himself pursued by the beautiful and clever Lucy Britford (Indira Varma: Rome). Problem is, shes a detective inspector set on catching Mickey and making him answer to all of his past crimes. Meanwhile Sean (Matt Di Angelo: EastEnders) and Emma (Kelly Adams: Holby City) must face up to some family history, and contemplate the best way to get the perfect revenge. The question is is it about the money?…” (Container description from Syndetics) Hu$tle. Series seven. “All six episodes from the seventh season of the BBC drama following the fortunes of a gang of London-based expert con artists with a moral bent. In this series, the team plans to stitch up the owner of a dodgy model agency and help a former hustler, after he fakes his own death, to evade the clutches of an Iranian gangster. Episodes comprise: ‘Silent Witness’, ‘Old Sparks Come New’, ‘Clearance from a Deal’, ‘Benny’s Funeral’, ‘The Fall of Railton FC’ and ‘The Delivery’…” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk) Hu$tle. Series eight. “The final season of Hustle was always going to have a lot to live up to. In the seven series that preceded it, all manner of capers and cons had been pulled, and the characters had been dragged through the mire on many occasions. Was there, it was asked, enough left in the tank for one more run? The answer? Yes. Yes there was. Hustle series eight might not be the show at its finest–indeed, there are a couple of dud episodes here–but it’s still to the credit of the writing team that they still find compelling rug-pulls to spring on the audience. You still have to pay as much attention as you always did, and that’s always part of the fun. What’s particularly pleasing here is how well Hustle goes out. Its confidence grows towards the end of its final series, and the last episode does the show proud. We’re not spoiling anything here, but for eight series, Hustle has set itself high standards, and it doesn’t relax them here. There might not be anything particularly special about the DVD release for Hustle season 8, but the six episodes alone, at nearly an hour apiece, comfortably offer terrific value, and plenty of rewatch potential. It might be a shame that Hustle had to sign off, but full credit to the show for doing it in such style…” (From Amazon.co.uk review) New tricks. Series 10. “Retired cops solve cold cases in this hit British series. The old dogs of the Unsolved Crime and Open Case Squad are about to welcome a few new faces. But first, Detective Superintendent Sandra Pullman (Amanda Redman, Sexy Beast) and her loyal team—Gerry Standing (Dennis Waterman, The Sweeney), Brian Lane (Alun Armstrong, Garrow’s Law), and Steve McAndrew (Denis Lawson, Bleak House)—will solve their final cases together, bringing justice to decades-old murders that stumped London’s Metropolitan Police. After Brian’s reckless behavior endangers his place on the team, brainy Danny Griffin (Nicholas Lyndhurst, Only Fools and Horses) steps in and rubs the rest of the squad the wrong way. Later, Sandra makes a choice that means a new boss for UCOS: feisty, fearless DCI Sasha Miller (Tamzin Outhwaite, EastEnders). The result is “a welcome new lease of life” (The Daily Telegraph, U.K.) for a show that has “plenty more tricks up its sleeve” (Western Daily Press, U.K.)…” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk)

    • NZIFF: Fashion Picks for August
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • This year’s New Zealand International Film Festival brings us two swoon-worthy fashion films – Dior and I and Yves Saint Laurent. To celebrate this auspicious occasion, we’ve compiled a selection of books and DVDs all about these two fashion greats for your perusal. With a selection of old favourites and glossy new titles, there’s something to suit everyone. Dior, the legendary images : great photographers and Dior / edited by Florence Müller ; preface by Jean-Paul Claverie ; English translation: Gail de Courcy-Ireland. “Published to accompany the Dior and Fashion Photography exhibition presented at the Musée Christian Dior in Granville, France, this lavish volume presents a wealth of gorgeous photographs that bring the character of the couturier’s dresses to life, with each photographer interpreting them in his or her unique style. Legendary contributors include Horst P. Horst, Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Cecil Beaton, Norman Parkinson, Henry Clarke, William Klein, Helmut Newton, Guy Bourdin, Sarah Moon, Paolo Roversi, Nick Knight, Ines Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Tim Walker, Willy Vanderperre, Patrick Demarchelier, and many more. Stunning, glamorous, and iconic, Dior and Fashion Photography exemplifies how the haute couture house transcended fashion to enter the realm of legend.” – adapted from amazon.com Yves Saint Laurent “A dazzling portrait of Yves Saint Laurent and his world of fashion over the last twenty-five years of his career, by legendary pioneer of backstage fashion photography, Roxanne Lowit. Yves Saint Laurent is a name synonymous with style, elegance, and high fashion. When he came on the scene at Dior and then started his own line, he quickly changed the way people regardedhaute couture and the world of fashion itself. He revolutionized women’s eveningwear when he introduced le smoking, a woman’s tuxedo, and made couture accessible to a younger generation.Yves Saint Laurentis Roxanne Lowit’s personal photographic history of Saint Laurent, the man and the fashion, from 1978, the year she first met him, to the last show he gave in 2002. Lowit shares magical moments of YSL with the world–intimate, social, absorbed in fashion–and creates a unique portrait of this towering figure of postwar couture.” – adapted from amazon.com Serge Lutens : Berlin à Paris / edited by Nagel Patrick. “One of the world’s most famous stylists and photographers, and perfume creator par excellence, Serge Lutens was the creative genius behind the cosmetics of Christian Dior. Born in Lille, he moved to Paris, where he was hired by Vogue to create make up” – Library catalogue. “This book focuses on Serge Lutens’ years working for Dior 1967-1977, offering previously unpublished material.” – amazon.com A queer history of fashion : from the closet to the catwalk / edited by Valerie Steele ; introduction by Hal Rubinstein ; contributions by Christopher Breward, Shaun Cole, Vicki Karaminas, Peter McNeil, Elizabeth Wilson. “From Christian Dior to Yves Saint Laurent and Alexander McQueen, many of the greatest fashion designers of the past century have been gay. Fashion and style have played an important role within the LGBTQ community, as well, even as early as the 18th century. This provocative book looks at the history of fashion through a queer lens, examining high fashion as a site of gay cultural production and exploring the aesthetic sensibilities and unconventional dress of LGBTQ people, especially since the 1950s, to demonstrate the centrality of gay culture to the creation of modern fashion. Sumptuous illustrations include both fashion photography and archival imagery”– Provided by publisher. L’amour fou [videorecording] / Les Films du Lendemain and Les Films de Pierre present a film by Pierre Thoretton. “A documentary on the relationship between fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent and his lover, Pierre Berge.” – library catalogue. Paris 1962 : Schatzberg : Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Dior : the early collections / photographs by Jerry Schatzberg. “A creator of poetic images and a compelling storyteller, Jerry Schatzberg has, over the past four decades, excelled in both photography and filmmaking. In the 1960s Schatzberg’s photographs in Vogue, Life, Esquire, and Glamour set a new standard for fashion photography, while his portraits documented the generation’s most notable artists, celebrities, and thinkers, from Bob Dylan to Robert Rauschenberg. In the 1970s he turned his attention to the medium of film. Directing classic movies including The Panic in Needle Park, starring Al Pacino, and Scarecrow, for which he won the Palme d’Or at Cannes.”–Book jacket. The beautiful fall : fashion, genius, and glorious excess in 1970s Paris / Alicia Drake. “In 1954 they were two young talents from the provinces, both dreaming of Paris, glamour and glory. Yves Saint Laurent was the charmed youth, the enfant terrible inheritor of Dior’s couture crown, his frame almost too slight to bear his genius. Karl Lagerfeld was the flamboyant freelance designer with a remarkable talent for ready-to-wear. Seemingly from a background of enormous wealth and privilege, he was in fact a tireless workaholic, driven by his passion for capturing the pose of the moment Each designer created his own mesmerising world, a world vivid and seductive enough to pull people to them – people attracted by their power, charisma and fame. The two cliques could not help but become rivals. “The Beautiful Fall” is Alicia Drake’s chronicle of this dangerous, brazen, fabulous time, and the two designers who were its essence and remain its most singular survivors.”– Adapted from the book jacket. Prêt-à-porter [videorecording] / a Robert Altman film. “In Moscow, Sergei purchases two Dior ties, one of which Olivier de la Fontaine, head of the French Fashion Council, receives. He visits his lover, fashion designer Simone Lowenthal, and then dies choking on a ham sandwich. Fashion reporters converge on Paris for the ready to wear fashion shows and schemes and intrigues ensue among them and the designers. De la Fontaine’s death turns out to be an accident. Lowenthal expresses her contempt for the fashion scene by ending her show with nude models.” – Library catalogue

    • Winter Interclub Series 2 – draws
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • Starting this week and here are the final draws, enjoy…. Premier Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Good luck to all teams!Filed under: TTW:Interclub

    • National win for NZSM graduate
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Te Kōkī New Zealand School of Music graduate, soprano Isabella Moore, has been crowned the winner of the 2014 Lexus Song Quest.

    • Capital gains in the capital city
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Victoria University of Wellington will today be hosting a public debate on the merits of more comprehensive capital gains tax—a step which taxation expert Associate Professor Dr David White considers would be beneficial for New Zealand.

    • Home, garden & DIY in Winter – featuring gardening for kids & DIY furniture
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • This month’s recent pick features home DIY and gardening projects, including some ideas for keeping the little ones busy in the winter! Also in this month’s picks — check out houses with energy saving designs. Handmade personalized photo gifts: over 75 creative DIY gifts and keepsakes to make from your photographs “Photographs always evoke strong emotions with those special moments caught on camera–this book shows you over 75 fabulous ways to display your photographs on virtually any surface! Using the very latest trends, techniques and materials this books shows you how photos can be added to practically any surface to create unique gifts. Project ideas include: canvas prints, bottles, plates, mugs and jars, jewellery, cushions, blankets, toys and puzzles. Step-by-step photographs will both teach and inspire you to create amazing results–so give your creativity free rein and fill your life with your special moments.” (Syndetics summary) Creative shrub garden: eye-catching combinations for year-round interest “The Creative Shrub Garden celebrates a plant that is too often taken for granted and gives gardeners the confidence to use shrubs in the design-forward treatment they deserve. This book shows you how to make the most of the many benefits of shrubs–including their hardiness, year-long beauty, size, and low-maintenance nature–by making them the main element in a garden design. McIndoe teaches you the basics first, with tips on choosing shrubs based on a garden’s size, determining soil and climate needs, and pruning and maintenance. He then offers hundreds of shrub combinations that work with 15 main garden styles, including coastal, cottage, Mediterranean, tropical, urban, and more.” (Abridged from Syndetics summary) DIY furniture 2 : a step-by-step guide / Christopher Stuart. “Featuring 30 new designs by leading designer-makers from around the world, DIY Furniture 2 builds on the international success of the previous title, showing you step-by-step how to make unique designer furniture.Including both conceptual objects and modern designs, the book showcases innovative processes using readily available materials commonly found at the local hardware store. Each project features diagrams with short, easy-to-follow instructions on how to build the piece.The projects range from novice to experienced, allowing the reader to start where they are comfortable and work towards more difficult projects as they gain knowledge, familiarity with tools, and confidence.The designs in this book will have you thinking about common materials in a whole new way!” (Syndetics summary) ProjectKid / Amanda Kingloff ; photographs by Alexandra Grablewski. “Perfect for crafty parents who are eager to get their kids excited about DIY. Have you ever think a body-wash bottle would make a perfect rocket ship? Author Kingloff uses everyday objects in an unexpected, ingenious way. And these are projects for things kids want to make–and keep–from a juice-box owl to a pirate ship to a curio cabinet for displaying all of their treasures, plus games, jewellery, and more. Also included in the book are basic crafting lessons (such as pom-pom making and weaving) to help children of all ages build a DIY arsenal, a handy guide to must-have tools and materials, and a source directory.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Taming wildflowers : bringing the beauty and splendor of nature’s blooms into your own backyard / Miriam Goldberger. “Easily cultivate wildflowers in your own garden…and have a year-after-year supply of gorgeous flowers at your fingertips. Wildflower farmer and floral designer Miriam Goldberger is here to show you how.” (Library Catalogue) The nesting place : it doesn’t have to be perfect to be beautiful / Myquillyn Smith. “Myquillyn believes that there is beauty in imperfection, in the lived-in and loved-on and used-just-about-up. Imperfections put people at ease and free us to take risks and create the home-and the life-we’ve always wanted. Myquillyn’s warm and insightful words are paired with her own gorgeous four-color photos and creative, easy ideas for arranging, decorating, and building a home that welcomes everyone. Readers will learn how to create their own style-without breaking the bank or stressing over comparisons.” (Abridged from Syndetics summary) Gardening lab for kids : 52 fun experiments to learn, grow, harvest, make, play, and enjoy your garden / Renata Fossen Brown. “A refreshing source of ideas to help your children learn to grow their own patch of earth. This fun and creative book features 52 plant-related activities set into weekly lessons, beginning with learning to read maps to find your heat zone, moving through seeds, soil, composting, and then creating garden art and appreciating your natural surroundings. Author Renata Fossen Brown guides your family through fun opportunities learning about botany, ecology, the seasons, food, patience, insects, eating, and cooking. The labs can be used as singular projects or to build up to a year of hands-on outdoor experiences. So, slip on your muddy clothes, and get out and grow.” (Abridged from Syndetics Summary) Warm house, cool house : inspirational designs for low-energy housing / Nick Hollo ; foreword by Jamie Durie. “To aid in the minimization of environmental impact, this book offers valuable advice on how to help keep homes cool in the summer and warm in the winter with little or no reliance upon appliances. Illustrated with more than 100 inspiring contemporary examples of low-energy housing design, this fully updated edition contains practical and clever suggestions to make any home–in any climatic zone–an environmentally sustainable, comfortable, and attractive place to live year-round, while keeping electricity, gas, and water bills comfortably low.” (Syndetics summary)

    • New fiction in July – including Stephen King’s latest
      • 28 Jul 2014
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • From chefs to spies, cowboys to war veterans, serial murders to investment bankers, this month’s selection of new Contemporary Fiction offers some great reading, and an amazing choice, no matter what your reading preference happens to be. Night heron / Adam Brookes. “In 1989, Li Huasheng (code name Peanut) was a promising Beijing engineer and the ringleader of a group of would-be defectors trading China’s technology secrets to the UK. But their operation aborted when Peanut was imprisoned in a labor camp after impulsively attacking a soldier during the Tiananmen Square protests. Two decades later, Peanut returns to Beijing, desperate to renew the deal with UK intelligence that he’s kept secret all these years. Peanut mistakes British journalist Philip Mangan for an undercover operative and approaches him with top-secret information. Mangan manages to get the proof documents to the embassy, and he’s immediately drafted into the world of espionage.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The bird skinner : a novel / Alice Greenway. “Jim Kennoway, embittered and frequently drunk, has retreated to his house on the Maine coast, still recuperating from his recent leg amputation. Once a renowned ornithologist, he is brought ever lower by his painful memories: of his bloody stint in naval intelligence in the Solomon Islands; of his great love affair with his wife, Helen, which ended tragically; and of his youthful escapades exploring the forest, which marked him as odd but also gave him his life’s calling. Now he has been chosen to host the daughter of an islander who was once his scout. He only wants to be left alone, but the tall, beautiful young woman called Cadillac brings with her high spirits and a similar appreciation for their natural surroundings.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Tigerman / Nick Harkaway. “Lester Ferris, sergeant of the British Army, is a good man in need of a rest. He’s spent a lot of his life being shot at, and Afghanistan was the last stop on his road to exhaustion. He has no family, he’s nearly forty and burned out and about to be retired. The island of Mancreu is the ideal place for Lester to serve out his time. It’s a former British colony in legal limbo, soon to be destroyed because of its very special version of toxic pollution, a down-at-heel, mildly larcenous backwater. Of course, that also makes Mancreu perfect for shady business, hence the Black Fleet of illicit ships lurking in the bay: listening stations, offshore hospitals, and money laundering operations, drug factories and deniable torture centres. None of which should be a problem, because Lester’s brief is to sit tight and turn a blind eye. But Lester Ferris has made a friend: a brilliant, Internet-addled street kid with a comic book fixation who will need a home when the island dies and who might, Lester hopes, become an adopted son. Now, as Mancreu’s small society tumbles into violence, the boy needs Lester to be more than just an observer.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk) Mr. Mercedes : a novel / Stephen King. “Retired Detective Bill Hodges is overweight, directionless, and toying with the idea of ending it all when he receives a jeering letter from the Mercedes Killer, who ran down 23 people with a stolen car but evaded Hodges’ capture. With the help of a 17-year-old neighbor and one victim’s sister, Hodges begins to play cat-and-mouse with the killer through a chat site called Under Debbie’s Blue Umbrella. Hodges’ POV alternates with that of the troubled murderer, a Norman Bates-like ice-cream-truck driver named Brady Hartfield. Both Hodges and Hartfield make mistakes, big ones.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The Last Kind Words Saloon : a novel / Larry McMurtry. “This novel traces the rich and varied friendship of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holiday from the town of Long Grass to Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in Denver, then to Mobetie, Texas, and finally to Tombstone, Arizona, culminating with the famed gunfight at the O.K. Corral.” (Adapted from Book cover) All I have in this world : a novel / Michael Parker. “Two strangers meet over the hood of a used car in Texas: Marcus, who is fleeing both his financial and personal failures; and Maria, who after years of dodging her mistakes has returned to her hometown to make amends. One looking forward, the other looking back, they face off over the car they both want and think they need: a low-slung sky-blue 1984 Buick Electra. The car, too, has seen its share of failures. Each dent and ripped seam represents a pivotal moment in the lives of others. After knowing each other for less than an hour, Marcus and Maria decide to buy the Buick together. As this surprising novel follows the rocky paths of the Electra and its owners, both past and present, these two strangers form an unexpected and ultimately resilient alliance.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) In the light of what we know / Zia Haider Rahman. “An investment banker approaching forty, his career collapsing and his marriage unravelling, receives a surprise visitor at his West London town house. Confronting the dishevelled figure of a South Asian male carrying a backpack, the banker recognizes a long-lost college friend, a mathematics prodigy who disappeared many years earlier under mysterious circumstances. The friend has resurfaced with a confession of unsettling power.” (Adapted from Book cover) The hunger and the howling of Killian Lone / Will Storr. “Killian Lone comes from a long line of gifted cooks, stretching back to the 17th century, and yearns to become a famous chef himself. When he starts an apprenticeship under Max Mann, the most famous chef in London, he looks set to continue the family tradition. But the reality of kitchen life is brutal and relentless. Even his fellow apprentice, Kathryn, who shows Killian uncharacteristic kindness, can’t stop him being sucked into the debauched and vicious world of 1980s fine dining; and gradually he is forced to surrender his dream.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The final testimony of Raphael Ignatius Phoenix / Paul Sussman. “Raphael Ignatius Phoenix has had enough. Born at the beginning of the 20th century, he is determined to take his own life as the old millennium ends and the new one begins. But before he ends it all, he wants to get his affairs in order and put the record straight, and that includes making sense of his own long life, a life that spanned the century. He decides to write it all down and, eschewing the more usual method of pen and paper, begins to record his story on the walls of the isolated castle that is his final home. Beginning with a fateful first adventure with Emily, the childhood friend who would become his constant companion, Raphael remembers the multitude of experiences, the myriad encounters and, of course, the ten murders he committed along the way.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Chop chop / Simon Wroe. “An outrageously funny and original debut set in the fast-paced and treacherous world of a restaurant kitchen. Fresh out of the university with big dreams, our narrator, is determined to escape his past and lead the literary life in London. But soon he is two months behind on rent for his depressing Camden Town bed-sit and forced to take a job doing grunt work in the kitchen of The Swan, a formerly grand restaurant that has lost its luster. Mockingly called ‘Monocle’ by his boisterous co-workers for a useless English lit degree, he is suddenly thrust into the unbelievably brutal, chaotic world of professional cooking and surrounded by a motley cast of co-workers for which no fancy education could have prepared him.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Beyond Gangnam Style
      • 27 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • A new documentary about the indie rock scene in South Korea, co-produced by a Victoria University academic, illustrates the changing face of globalisation as the local music reaches out to the rest of the world.

    • The mysteries of Antarctic sea ice
      • 27 Jul 2014
      • Victoria University of Wellington
      • Opinion piece by Dr James Renwick, an associate professor in the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington.

    • Career and vocational training options for school leavers
      • 27 Jul 2014
      • Wellington Girls' College
      • Find out more about vocational pathways, career and future training options from Kaye Johnson, Careers and Transition Head of Department, Wellington Girls' College (WGC) on Tuesday 19 August at 5.30pm in the Wellington Girls' College staffroom, Level 1 Tower Block. Ideal for senior students and parents.  To register please email PAEvents@wgc.school.nz. (Organised by the WGC Parents' Association)

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