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    • For Michel Barnier - Some Help from Rudyard Kipling (1909)
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • THE PUZZLER The Celt in all his variants from Builth to Ballyhoo,His mental processes are plain--one knows what he will do,And can logically predicate his finish by his start;But the English--ah, the English!--they are quite a race apart. Their psychology is bovine, their outlook crude and raw.They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw;But the straw that they were tickled with-the chaff that they were fed with--They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with. For undemocratic reasons and for motives not of  State,They  arrive  at  their  conclusions--largely  inarticulate.Being void of self-expression they confide their views to none;But sometimes in a smoking-room,  one learns why things were done. Yes, sometimes in a smoking-room, through clouds of "Ers" an "Ums,"Obliquely  and by inference,  illumination  comes,On some step that they have taken, or some action they approveEmbellished with the argot of the Upper Fourth Remove. In telegraphic sentences  half nodded to their friends,They hint a matter's inwardness--and there the matter ends.And while the Celt is talking from Valencia to  Kirkwall,The English--ah, the English!--don't say anything at all.

    • Find a new favourite in our contemporary fiction picks
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • The picks of the contemporary fiction this month feature a range of authors who work will enfold or re-enfold you in their worlds. They include debut novelists recommended for their construction and characters and a reprint of an Australian author’s exploration of mortality. Some of these authors are award winners or listed for literary prizes. Intrigue, insight, deception, mystery, invention and sardonic humour can be found in the library’s new fiction additions. Tangerine / Christine Mangan. “Obsession intersects two love triangles in this tale of devotion gone wrong. Twisted passion, perceived betrayal, and a fight for survival are written into the exotic, colourful, and dangerous backdrop of 1950s Tangier, Morocco. Alice Shipley and Lucy Mason are introverted college roommates who quickly become best friends. But when Alice finds romance with Tom, odd things happen, ending with a car accident that tears their lives apart. Trying to forget Lucy and their tainted past, Alice marries a man she hardly knows and moves to Tangier–a place that holds the promise of adventure laced with the thrill of danger but that proves too threatening for Alice. When Lucy discovers that Alice’s marriage is far from happy, she decides to rescue the woman she’d loved in college, once again claiming her as her own.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Adjustment day / Chuck Palahniuk. “People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning. Adjustment Day, the author’s first novel in four years, is an ingeniously comic work in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. When Adjustment Day arrives, it fearlessly makes real the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact, and conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche.” (Syndetics summary) Frankenstein in Baghdad : a novel / Ahmed Saadawi ; translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright. “From the rubble-strewn streets of U.S.-occupied Baghdad, Hadi–a scavenger and an oddball fixture at a local café–collects human body parts and stitches them together to create a corpse. His goal, he claims, is for the government to recognize the parts as people and to give them proper burial. But when the corpse goes missing, a wave of eerie murders sweeps the city, and reports stream in of a horrendous-looking criminal who, though shot, cannot be killed. Hadi soon realizes he’s created a monster, one that needs human flesh to survive–first from the guilty, and then from anyone in its path.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The executor / Blake Morrison. “What matters most: marriage or friendship? fidelity or art? the wishes of the living or the talents of the dead? Matt Holmes finds himself considering these questions sooner than he thinks when his friend, the poet Robert Pope, dies unexpectedly. Bestselling novelist and poet Blake Morrison creates a biting portrait of competitive male friendship, sexual obsession and the fragile transactions of married life. The Executor innovatively interweaves poetry and prose to form a gripping literary detective story.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary). The eight mountains / Paolo Cognetti ; translated from the Italian by Simon Carnell and Erica Segre. “The international sensation about two young Italian boys from different backgrounds who meet in the mountains every summer, and the men they grow to become. Pietro, a lonely city boy, spends his childhood summers in a secluded valley in the Alps. Bruno, the cowherd son of a local stonemason, knows the mountains intimately. A modern Italian masterpiece, The Eight Mountains is a lyrical coming-of-age story spanning three decades; a novel about the power of male friendships and a meditation on loyalty, being in nature, and finding one’s place in the world.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Property : stories between two novellas / Lionel Shriver. “A striking new collection of ten short stories and two novellas that explores the idea of property in every meaning of the word. Lionel Shriver’s first collection explores property in both senses of the word: real estate and stuff. These pieces illustrate how our possessions act as proxies for ourselves, in Lionel Shriver’s world, we may possess people and objects and places, but in turn they possess us. Exhibiting a satisfying thematic unity unusual for a collection, this masterful work showcases the biting insight that has made Shriver one of the most acclaimed writers of our time.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Folk / Zoe Gilbert. “The remote island village of Neverness is a world far from our time and place. The air hangs rich with the coconut-scent of gorse and the salty bite of the sea. Harsh winds scour the rocky coastline. The villagers’ lives are inseparable from nature and its enchantments. Tales of this island community interweave over the course of a generation, their earthy desires, resentments, idle gossip and painful losses create a staggeringly original world. Verlyn Webbe, born with a wing for an arm, unfurls his feathers in defiance of past shame; Plum is snatched by a water bull and dragged to his lair; little Crab Skerry takes his first run through the gorse-maze; Madden sleepwalks through violent storms, haunted by horses and her father’s wishes.” (Syndetics summary) Breath / Tim Winton. “When paramedic Bruce Pike is called out to deal with another teenage adventure gone wrong, he knows better than his colleague, better than the kid’s parents, what happened and how. Thirty years before, that dead boy could have been him. A relentlessly gripping and deeply moving novel about the damage you do to yourself when you’re young and think you’re immortal. Originally published in 2008.” (Syndetics summary) Dead men’s trousers / Irvine Welsh. “Mark Renton is finally a success. An international jet-setter, he now makes significant money managing DJs, but the constant travel, airport lounges, soulless hotel rooms and broken relationships have left him dissatisfied with his life. He’s then rocked by a chance encounter with Frank Begbie, who appears to have reinvented himself as a celebrated artist. Sick Boy and Spud are intrigued to learn that their old friends are back in town, but when they enter the bleak world of organ-harvesting, things start to go so badly wrong. One of these four will not survive to the end of this book. Which one of them is wearing Dead Men’s Trousers?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Twisted prey / John Sandford.Twisted Prey “Taryn Grant had run successfully for the U.S. Senate, where Lucas had predicted she’d fit right in. He was also convinced that she’d been responsible for three murders, though he’d never been able to prove it. Once a psychopath had gotten that kind of rush, though, he or she often needed another fix, so he figured he might be seeing her again. He was right. A federal marshal now, with a very wide scope of investigation, he’s heard rumours that Grant has found her seat on the Senate intelligence committee, and the contacts she’s made from it, to be very…useful.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Panic room / Robert Goddard. “Sometimes the danger is on the inside… High on a Cornish cliff sits a vast uninhabited mansion, uninhabited except for Blake, a young woman of dubious background, secretive and alone, currently acting as house sitter. The house has a panic room. Even Blake doesn’t know it’s there. She’s too busy being on the run from life, from a story she thinks she’s escaped. But her remote existence is going to be invaded when people come looking for the house’s owner, missing rogue pharma entrepreneur, Jack Harkness.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary). The woman in the woods / John Connolly. “The new thrilling instalment of John Connolly’s popular Charlie Parker series. It is spring, and the semi-preserved body of a young Jewish woman is discovered buried in the Maine woods. It is clear that she gave birth shortly before her death. But there is no sign of a baby. Private detective Charlie Parker is engaged by the lawyer Moxie Castin to shadow the police investigation and find the infant, but Parker is not the only searcher. Someone else is following the trail left by the woman, someone with an interest in more than a missing child, someone prepared to leave bodies in his wake. And in a house by the woods, a toy telephone begins to ring. For a young boy is about to receive a call from a dead woman…” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Due to ice on the overheads this morning, some services across Kapiti and Hutt Valley lines are experiencing delays.
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Due to ice on the overheads this morning, some services across Kapiti and Hutt Valley lines are experiencing delays.We are currently experiencing delays on some services this morning: Hutt Valley LineNorthbound:The 5.50am service from Wellington to Upper Hutt is currently delayed by 23 minutes. Southbound:Kapiti Line:Northbound:The 5.52am service from Wellington to Waikanae is currently delayed by 13 minutes. Southbound:The 5.30am service from Waikanae to Wellington is currently delayed by 25 minutes. The 6.14am service from Plimmerton to Wellington is currently delayed by 15 minutes. Note: Please take extra care when walking on the platforms this morning as we have had reports of some icy conditions. Stay warm! We will keep you updated on delayed services. This affects these services: HVL KPL MEL

    • Local to international: New CDs
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Check out some of these newly catalogued CDs in our AV collection including the fantastic new albums by Kimbra and Arctic Monkeys. The gorgeous box-set by Procol Harum and the 30th anniversary edition of Bruce Springsteen’s classic Born To Run offer rare footage as well. We have a lot of box-sets and they keep coming. Come in and check them out! Arctic Monkeys – Tranquility Base hotel + casino “To the fact that Alex Turner was a mere 32 years old when he unleashed Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino onto the world, a young age that seems older because Arctic Monkeys released their debut when he was just 19. Throughout Tranquility Base, Turner comes across as if he were much, much older than his actual age, cocking an eyebrow to a potential paramour who has the audacity to have never seen Blade Runner, and reminiscing about the ’70s — a decade he never saw.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz) Janelle Monae – Dirty computer “2018 release, the third studio album by singer Janelle Monáe. Dirty Computer is the follow up to her critically acclaimed studio albums, The ArchAndroid (2010) and The Electric Lady (2013). Includes the singles ‘Make Me Feel’ and ‘Django Jane’.” (adapted from mightyape.co.nz) Laurie Anderson – Landfall “The piece, which was inspired by Anderson’s experience of Hurricane Sandy, is the first collaboration between the iconic storyteller/musician and the groundbreaking string quartet, who perform together on the recording. Landfall juxtaposes lush electronics and strings with Anderson’s powerful descriptions of loss, from water-logged pianos to disappearing animal species to Dutch karaoke bars.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Kimbra – Primal heart “For her follow-up to The Golden Echo, Kimbra could have expanded on any one of its eclectic sounds. Instead, on Primal Heart she combines all of the styles she explored on that album into a more cohesive — and immediate — approach. A consistently winning album, Primal Heart finds Kimbra hitting the sweet spot between imagination and accessibility — if her nods to the mainstream get more ears pointed her way, so much the better.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz) Delaney Davidson – Shining day “Delaney Davidson looks wryly at the packed suitcase, nailing the last things into place for his 2018 migration. It was supposed to be a year of settling in but the world has other plans for him, starting with his new album release. 50 days into 2018 and Davidson has ticked off a 6 song writing session with SJD (Sean James Donnelly), album production for Belladonna (Lytteltons black metal doom band). UK label Glass Records Redux (Spaceman 3, Spiritualized) has picked up Shining Day his 9th solo album. It has been 2 ½ years since the release of his last studio album Lucky Guy.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Julia Deans – We light fire “With the release of bold first single ‘Walking In The Sun’ in September 2017, Julia Deans whet the appetite of fans and critics alike for her new album. The album has been recorded in a home studio in Northcote, Auckland, which Julia’s partner David Wernham built over the course of six months 2011, and she began writing the songs not long after. While writing the songs was a very solo pursuit, the recording of them was less so, with Deans working closely with Wernham on “pulling the musical story together”.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Procol Harum – Still there’ll be more : an anthology 1967-2017 “This eight disc set comprises five CDs and three DVDs, of which the first three discs draw upon the key tracks from Procol Harum’s illustrious career. Disc four features the band’s legendary concert at the Hollywood Bowl on 21 September 1973, whilst disc five features a previously unreleased concert at the Bournemouth Winter Gardens on 17 March 1976. Still There’ll Be More is the most elaborate celebration of Procol Harum’s music released to date and this deluxe boxed set is a fine tribute to fifty years of one of Britain’s greatest bands.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Miles Davis – The final tour : the bootleg series vol. 6 “The latest entry in the award-winning Miles Davis Bootleg Series focuses on the final chapter in the landmark collaboration between Davis and saxophonist John Coltrane: their last live performances together, in Europe in the spring of 1960. These historic performances marked Miles and Trane’s last outing together and showcased both musicians’ incredible influence on the changing sound of jazz. The beautiful music they made together is presented here officially for the very first time.” (adapted from amazon.com) The Who – Live at the Fillmore East 1968 “April 2018 – the 50th anniversary of these legendary unreleased recordings from the Fillmore East, New York City, Friday April 5 & Saturday April 6, 1968. Both nights were recorded by Who manager Kit Lambert with the intention of releasing as the Who’s fourth album after Sell Out and before Tommy. Remastered for optimum sound quality, this will enhance The Who’s reputation as the best live act of the time, regarded by fans as something of a ‘holy grail’ in live shows.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Bruce Springsteen – Born to run “Personally supervised by Bruce Springsteen and Jon Landau, the bookset includes Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75, an astonishing film of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band’s legendary 1975 concert at the Hammersmith Odeon in London; the new film Wings for Wheels: The Making of Born to Run; the classic album in remastered cd form; and finally, a 48 page booklet of previously unpublished photographs. With its two DVDs, the package offers approximately four hours of previously unseen footage.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

    • Newsletter
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Clyde Quay School
      • 20 June 2018 CQS Newsletter

    • Newsletter
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Clyde Quay School
      • 20 June 2018 CQS Newsletter

    • Selected picks from our latest graphic novels
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • There is a rich diversity in this month’s graphic novel picks, from continuations of acclaimed series such as Arthur De Pins’ The Revolution of the Crabs to historic seminal cult works such as the DC House of Horror anthology to a wonderful graphic novel celebrating the rebel ladies who rocked the world. All in all it’s a rich cornucopia with works to suit all tastes. The death of Stalin / writer, Fabien Nury ; artist, Thierry Robin. “On March 1, 1953, the Secretary General of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Joseph Stalin, had a severe stroke. A doctor could not be called until the Central Committee had convened, voted, and agreed on which doctor to use, a task made more complex by the fact that Stalin had just ordered the deaths of many of the Soviet Union’s leading physicians. And so began the bureaucratic merry-go-round that became the intense and underhanded struggle for control of a nation.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The green hand and other stories / Nicole Claveloux with Edith Zha ; introduction by Daniel Clowes ; translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith. “Nicole Claveloux’s short stories–originally published in the late 1970s and never before collected in English–are among the most beautiful comics ever drawn: whimsical, intoxicating, with the freshness and splendor of dreams. In hallucinatory colour or elegant black-and-white, she brings us into lands that are strange but oddly recognizable, filled with murderous grandmothers and lonely city dwellers, bad-tempered vegetables and walls that are surprisingly easy to fall through. This new selection, designed and introduced by Daniel Clowes, presents the full achievement of an unforgettable, unjustly neglected master of French comics.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Orion’s outcasts / Corbeyran & Jorge Miguel ; Corbeyran, writer ; Jorge Miguel, artist & colorist ; Mark Bence, translator. “Now, instead of Kolhen’s warrior tattoo, the young man wears the mark of the rejected, the ‘outcasts’ as they are known on the planet Absalon. Determined to prove his innocence and to get revenge on those who framed him, Kolhen escapes captivity with the help of the fiery Tryana, another of society’s pariahs. On his quest, Kolhen meets a mysterious woman with golden hair, who’s armed with strange and powerful weaponry, and who claims to be an envoy from another planet: Earth.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rashomon : a Commissioner Heigo Kobayashi case / story and art by Victor Santos ; translations by Katie LaBarbera. “Victor Santos (Polar, Violent Love) writes and illustrates a crime and mystery story inspired by Ryunosuke Akutagawa’s tales featuring the heroic commissioner Heigo Kobayashi. When the body of a skilled samurai is found along the road to Yamashina in feudal Japan, the search begins for his killer. Detective Heigo Kobayashi takes the case but finds only dead-end clues and no first-hand witnesses.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The walking dead. Volume 29, Lines we cross / Robert Kirkman, creator, writer ; Charlie Adlard, penciler ; Stefano Gaudiano, inker. “Recent events have thrown Alexandria into turmoil, and now Rick, Dwight, Eugene and Negan all have something to prove.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Brazen : rebel ladies who rocked the world / Pénélope Bagieu ; English translation by Montana Kane. “Throughout history and across the globe, one characteristic connects the daring women of Brazen : their indomitable spirit.With her characteristic wit and dazzling drawings, celebrated graphic novelist Pénélope Bagieu profiles the lives of these feisty female role models, some world famous, some little known. From Nellie Bly to Mae Jemison or Josephine Baker to Naziq al-Abid, the stories in this comic biography are sure to inspire the next generation of rebel ladies.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The Hellblazer. Vol. 3, The inspiration game / Tim Seeley, Richard Kadrey, writers ; Jesús Merino, Davide Fabbri, José Marzán Jr., artists. “Death doesn’t just become John Constantine–it shadows the poor bastard’s every step, from his home turf of London to the streets of San Francisco. What’s more, it has a nasty habit of striking where the DC Universe’s street-level sorcerer least expects it–like his dreams. After waking from a vengeful drunken nightmare, Constantine finds that a real-life murder has been committed. Could he have done the deed himself in a blacked-out rage? Or is some sinister force turning his subconscious mind into the ultimate untraceable weapon?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The march of the crabs [3] : the revolution of the crabs / written and illustrated by Arthur de Pins ; translated by Edward Gauvin. “The March of the Crabs concludes in the third volume of the Eisner Award-nominated series. Inhabiting the Gironde estuary, there is a race of crabs known for their strange defect: unable to evolve, they are condemned to spend their lives walking a single straight line. When Sunny, Boater, and Guitar, discovered a way to spur their biology and change directions, their bold moves broke the crabs into two clans: the rigid (who walk straight) and the turners (who change direction). Now, these two factions are prepared for battle as the other underwater creatures look on, ready to take a side. But the stunning rebellion comes in the crosshairs of another species on the brink of their own cataclysmic change of course… humanity.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Bullseye : the Colombian connection. “He’s a ruthless hitman who never misses, a deadly foe who can turn any object into a lethal weapon! But why is the Marvel Universe’s most dangerous assassin heading to Colombia to take aim at a drug cartel? Find out as Bullseye takes charge!” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rock Candy Mountain. Volume one / written & drawn by Kyle Starks. “It’s the first collection of the manic, hobo fighting epic that is Rock Candy Mountain. Come inside and meet the mysterious, unbeatable hobo Jackson on his quest to find the mythical hobo heaven. Meet his sidekick Pomona Slim. But watch out for the Devil! And the FBI! And the Hobo Mafia too! It’s a fantastical fisticuff frolic through post- World War II America via the rails and backroads through underground fight clubs, prison and the hobo jungles wrought with dangers, hobo fights, jokes and locomotive excitement.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rom [3] : long roads to ruin / plot and script by Chris Ryall & Christos Gage ; art by David Messina ; pencils by Guy Dorian, Sr. ; inks by Michele Pasta and Sal Buscema. “Rom now has help in his war against the Dire Wraiths in the form of additional Solstar Knights and super-powered human allies both… so why is the battle going from bad to worse? The Wraiths’ master plan grows and Rom can’t even see it, let alone find any way to stop it.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Teo Reo: Whakapapa Poneke - Te Whare Tangata
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • TE REO – OUR PASSPORT OUT OF THE SWAMP Some years ago, I was irritated and saddened to hear an American visitor tell me that New Zealand was ‘just like one of the US states’. Of course, I expostulated - but I have myself at times quoted the fact that its population puts it in the same class [4-5 million] as South Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, Kentucky and Oregon. In happier times, being likened to Oregon was not the end of the world though most of us would jib and buck at being associated at all with The South. Nowadays, finding points of differentiation and accentuating them is becoming pressing if we want to preserve our standing as a beacon of common sense and civilized norms. And here we have been gifted with a truly wonderful treasure or taonga – the Maori language Teo Reo and the wonderful culture that it enfolds and displays. Hence my strong support for ongoing efforts to make more of our enormous Good Fortune. Capital city has a duty to lead the way with te reo Māori https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/104856474/capital-city-has-a-duty-to-lead-the-way-with-te-reo-mori As our Deputy Mayor Jill Day explains: Tōku reo, tōku ohooho,Tōku reo, tōku māpihi maureaTōku whakakai marihi Ngā kupu mai i te waiata He Kākano Āhau, nā Hohepa Tamehana ka whakarapopoto i te whai tikanga o Te Tauihu - te kaupapa here I te reo Māori o te Kaunihera o Pōneke. Ko te tino wawata mō tō tātou tāone, mō Aotearoa hoki, kia kōrerotia, kia rangona,kia kitea i te reo Māori, ahakoa nō hea koe ahakoa ko wai rānei. Mā tēnei kaupapa here e āwhina, e ārahi i a mātou i roto i ngā mahi o te Kaunihera, pera atu ki ngā kaupapa here o tātou. Ka whakawhanake i te mahere mahi ki te taha o mana whenua, o te hunga whai pānga hoki, kia mōhio ai tātou me pēhea te tutuki i te wawata nei. Ā muri i te reanga tuatahi ka ngaro ai te reo, ko te whakaaro e toru reanga ki mua te roanga kia whakarauora i te reo. Mō tātou e ako ana ki te kōrero i tenei wa, ehara mo tātou noaiho engari mō ngā tamariki me ngā mokopuna, kia whai wāhi rātou ki te ako, ki te kōrero, ki te tupu ake i roto i te reo Māori. Mena kāore tātou e tutuki I tēnei mahi inaianei, ka waiho mā te reanga e whai kia otia. Ka kitea e tātou i te nama o ngā tangata Pākeha e ako ana, e tatari ana ki te ako i te reo Māori, anā he hiahia nui ki te kite i te puāwaitanga o te reo. Kua whakaae anō hoki ngā tangata o Pōneke – 94 ōrau – kia mahia te mahi, kia whai hua ngā wawata nei o mātou o te Kaunihera. Kia mārama ai – ehara tēnei i te takahi mana i te reo Pākeha kia tū tētahi ki runga i tētahi atu. Engari kia whai mana ngā reo e rua ki tēnei whenua. Ko te reo Māori he reo whaimana ā-ture nō Aotearoa, ā koia me tū kaha te mana o te reo Māori ki te taha o te reo Pākeha. He wāhi tino motuhake tō te reo Māori ki te ahurei o Aotearoa, ki te tuakiri hoki mō tātou katoa e noho ana ki te whenua nei. Nā te mea ko Pōneke te tāone matua, he hōnore tēnei ki te arahi i tenei mahi nui ki te taha o mana whenua. Which brings me back to a poem that I published 29 September 2013: TAKING ON WATER AS I TACK HOME Up at the bar, the timber looks new Shiny, stripped back and light in colour. I have moored my yawl on reclaimed land And set my money down for an IPA Here at our oldest pub, The Thistle. As I enter, a sign claims ‘Founded 1840’ And I browse between the prints and photos Showing the building’s sepia history, Circumnavigating a table of bright young things - And a dark lady in the corner. She notices my trawling and asks Are you interested in the past? She brings her drink and then her hand bag over And we sit and share a conversation At first about the Wearable Arts Show. Soon, we share common ground at the shore And I remind her that the great Chief Te Rauparaha Used to drag his waka up the muddy beach And order a whiskey or two, while chatting to the whalers, Yarning stories about his kids and his massacres. Then we exchange names at which she is playfully precise: "Hine Mahoney but you can call me Jenny - Don’t say Maloney - don’t say baloney. You say you are a writer, let’s do rounds of poems”. This more or less was one of mine. When it has come to my advantage, I call‘The Love of My Life’ to tie the rondeau. She responds - dreamily, insistently "My whakapapa: for I am wāhine atua From te whare tangata (the doorway of life). They took our language not just our land”. ...I chide them for her, the Founding Fathers: The only country in the world founded By Real Estate Agents, who divided before they grew - Still speculating on a housing or a dairy boom. Therefore my mistress’ eyes are raven black.In the old age black was not counted fair Or if it were, it bore not beauty’s name; But now is black beauty’s successive heir, That every tongue says beauty should look so. The fisherman has tide and fish to catchThe sea has beach and cliff to own The heart breasts waves that ebb and die Swimming deep it falters by and by And those who grieve are oft bereft alone Two is my limit, I’m afraid -I don’t want to wrap the car round a lamp post. My young sons were overwrought from The school production and set to watch a Pokemon film And there is a 20:20 later tonight from India.

    • New books in the library’s NZ collection
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Come for the quiet reading spaces on the second floor at Central Library and find something interesting amongst these selected new books of the New Zealand collection. This month you can find studies of love and loss, study our kiwi language and our literature, find out how a graffiti project became a monument and find new insights into Pacifica history from Cook to the dawn raids. How we met : the ways great love begins… / Michèle A’Court. “How We Met is based on a collection of ‘How We Met’ stories – those lovely stories couples love to tell (and we all love to hear) about how they got together – The author’s theory: that these stories of how couples meet – the romantic, absurd, serendipitous, convoluted, scandalous, breath-taking moments of connection – help to weave their lives together. Partly as ‘proof’ that they were meant to begin this couple-journey, and also because in each retelling they go back to those first falling-in-love feelings and rekindle the passion. Michele then tests her theory out on a neuroscientist and a psychologist, and by the end of the book has some useful things to say not only about how great love starts, but how it stays great.” (Syndetics summary) Sorrows of a century : interpreting suicide in New Zealand, 1900-2000 / John C. Weaver. “Focusing on New Zealand because it has the most comprehensive and accessible coroners’ records, Weaver analyzes a staggering amount of information to determine the social and cultural factors that contribute to suicide rates. He examines the country’s investigations into sudden deaths, places them within the context of major events and societal changes, and turns to witnesses’ statements, suicide notes, and medical records to remark on prevention strategies.” (Publisher information) Kiwi speak / Justin Brown. “Do you speak Nu Zild? In Kiwi Speak, bestselling author Justin Brown eavesdrops at the dinner table, the school yard, the farm and the sports club to bring us an entertaining dictionary of phrases and expressions – the often hilarious, sometimes baffling New Zealandisms we use in everyday life.” (Syndetics summary) Poetry and Exile : Letters from New Zealand 1938-1948 “German-Jewish poet Karl Wolfskehl spent the last years of his life, from 1938 to 1948, in Auckland, New Zealand, on the globe’s last island reef, as a refugee from Nazi Germany. The conditions of his life forced him to consider the very nature of human existence, and his letters from New Zealand amount to an intellectual autobiography. During his Auckland years Wolfskehl got to know the formative generation of New Zealand writers:Frank Sargeson, R. A. K. Mason, A. R. D. Fairburn (who dedicated his Poems 1929-1941 to Wolfskehl),Denis Glover and the acolytes of the Caxton Press and, to a lesser degree, Allen Curnow.” (Syndetics summary) The Bulford Kiwi : the kiwi we left behind / Colleen Brown. “Little known story from after WW1, when NZ troops waited months in Sling Camp in southern England after the war ended to get a ship home. Rioting in the camp led to plans to keep troops busy by cutting a giant Kiwi into the chalk hill behind the camp. The Bulford Kiwi has become a monument built by soldiers, not governments, for themselves and their mates. In 2017 the Bulford Kiwi was made a protected heritage site by UK government.” (Syndetics summary) Discoveries : the voyages of Captain Cook / Nicholas Thomas. “Cook’s great voyages marked the end of an era in world history. As he sailed into Hawaii in January 1778 he made contact with the last of the human civilizations to grow up independently of the rest of the world. But equally for the Polynesians and Melanesians of the Pacific, Cook’s arrival in their midst merely marked a further (if disastrous) twist in diverse histories already many centuries old. In this immensely enjoyable and absorbing book Cook’s journeys are reimagined, attempting to leave behind (or master) our later preoccupations to let us see what Cook and his associates experienced and what the societies he encountered experienced.” (Syndetics summary) Dawn Raids “Tension is rising in 1970s New Zealand. Muldoon’s government is cracking down on illegal immigration and the notorious dawn raids are ripping Pasifika families from their beds. At the eye of this political storm, everyday New Zealanders like Sione struggle to keep their families united. Fuarosa, the family’s resident overstayer, fights against the chaos to keep hold of her freedom, and Sione’s sister Teresa might be getting in too deep with black rights activists. First staged in 1997, Dawn Raids is just as confronting and relevant now as it has ever been. Oscar Kightley pulls no punches and brings the play to life with his trademark hilarity and wit.” (Syndetics summary) Seek and destroy : the history of 3 Squadron RNZAF / Paul Harrison. “In 2015 No.3 Squadron Royal New Zealand Air Force celebrated 50 years of continuous helicopter operations since it reformed in August 1965. Seek and Destroy is the official history of the machines and personnel that make up the colourful and wide-ranging operations of this unique squadron, which was first formed in 1930 and whose aircraft and personnel have seen service all around the world from the UK to Asia, the Pacific and the Antarctic. This illustrated hardback brings together anecdotal stories of the operations and exercises conducted during the past 50 years, including numerous civil defence and peacekeeping activities.” (Syndetics summary) The New Zealand Wars / Philippa Werry. “The story of the 19th century New Zealand Wars, a part of New Zealand’s history that many people wish they knew more about. The book describes how the wars came about, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and how they affected women and children. It explains the emergence of Kīngitanga or Māori King movement, the land confiscations and the story of Parihaka. The story is told in an accessible way full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.” (Publisher description) Towards democratic renewal : ideas for constitutional change in New Zealand / Geoffrey Palmer and Andrew Butler, with assistance from Scarlet Roberts. “In 2016, Sir Geoffrey Palmer and Andrew Butler proposed and published a written, codified constitution for Aotearoa New Zealand. Since then the authors have travelled the country, discussing with the public the nature of New Zealand’s identity and where the country is headed. This clear, revised constitution defines and entrenches government accountability and transparency, protects the rights of our peoples and tangata whenua, and offers transformative steps to uphold the sovereignty and integrity of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Publisher information)

    • Milan Mrkusich (1925-2018) Chromatic Investigator
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • Today – a guest post from regular reader and commenter, Starkive, on one of New Zealand’s best modern artists: Not strictly a Wellington figure, but surely a nationally important one in painting, design and architecture, Milan Mrkusich, has died at 93. Along with the likes of McCahon, Angus and Wollaston (although never really part of the club) Mrkusich and his erstwhile confederate Gordon Walters defined the idea of a thoroughly New Zealand contemporary artist in the 1940s and 50s. He arrived at pure abstraction before all of them and pursued it with a stern rigour which somehow left plenty of room for subtlety and light. Whatever he made seemed to draw on a profound immersion in colour. From his first show at the Auckland School of Architecture in 1949, his work frequently crossed into architecture. He collaborated extensively with Brenner Associates, including Vladimir Cacala, Stephen Jelicich, Desmond Mullen and John Butterworth, providing furniture and interiors for a number of significant Brenner projects. Most notably, he designed and built his own house in Remuera – a key moment in the development of New Zealand domestic modernism. He also produced a number of large-scale public works, including a personal favourite, the BJ Ball mural in Auckland, and the one best known to Wellington, the Te Papa wall of glass. The scope of his ambition and influence was demonstrated at the Auckland Art Gallery’s blockbuster 1950s Show in 1992, where he had a section all to himself, as well as featuring in the design, architecture and painting sections Artist John Reynolds, a Mrkusich admirer of long standing, described his death as “the end of that Twentieth Century contemplation”.

    • New sci fi and fantasy selections
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • This month’s featured science fiction and fantasy novels are selected from our wide range of new acquisitions, and include a series conclusion from Elizabeth May and a future cop mystery from award-winning author John Scalzi. There are also several novels that weave into their plots such themes as mining, alternative medieval Britain and bleak dystopian cities. All will ensure fascinating, thrilling reading. Head on / John Scalzi. “John Scalzi returns with Head On, the standalone follow-up to the critically acclaimed Lock In. Hilketa is a frenetic and violent pastime where players attack each other with swords and hammers. The main goal of the game: obtain your opponent’s head and carry it through the goalposts. With flesh and bone bodies, a sport like this would be impossible. But all the players are “threeps,” robot-like bodies controlled by people with Haden’s Syndrome, so anything goes. No one gets hurt, but the brutality is real and the crowds love it. Until a star athlete drops dead on the playing field. Is it an accident or murder? FBI agents and Haden-related crime investigators, Chris Shane and Leslie Vann, are called in to uncover the truth–and in doing so travel to the darker side of the fast-growing sport of Hilketa, where players and owners do whatever it takes to win, on and off the field.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The fallen kingdom / Elizabeth May. “My name is Lady Aileana Kameron. First the fae murdered my mother. Then they destroyed my world. Then one of them killed me. Now I’m fighting for more than revenge. The long-awaited final book in the Falconer trilogy is an imaginative tour-de-force that will thrill fans of the series. Aileana Kameron, resurrected by ancient fae magic, returns to the world she once knew with no memory of her past and with dangerous powers she struggles to control. Desperate to break the curse that pits two factions of the fae against, her only hope is hidden in an ancient book guarded by the legendary Morrigan, a faery of immense power and cruelty.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Earthcore / Scott Sigler. “Deep below a desolate Utah mountain lies the largest platinum deposit ever discovered. A billion-dollar find, it waits for any company that can drill a world’s record, three-mile-deep mine shaft. EarthCore is the company with the technology, the resources and the guts to go after the mother lode. Young executive Connell Kirkland is the company’s driving force, pushing himself and those around him to uncover the massive treasure. But at three miles below the surface, where the rocks are so hot they burn bare skin, something has been waiting for centuries. Waiting … and guarding. Kirkland and EarthCore are about to find out firsthand why this treasure has never been unearthed.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The wolf / Leo Carlew. “Carlew’s debut novel presents an alternate medieval Britain in which the isle of Albion is shared by human Saxons and two races of giants: the incredibly long-lived Anakim and the larger and rarer Unhieru. The uneasy peace between the southern Saxon kingdom and the Black Kingdom of the Anakim is broken as the Sutherners invade, scoring an unexpected victory and killing the current Black Lord. The novel follows both the Anakim heir, Roper, as he attempts to defend the kingdom from invasion while dealing with rivals for the throne, and the leader of the southern invasion, Bellamus, a commoner attempting to not only destroy the Anakim but also secure his own advancement.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Blackfish City / Sam J. Miller. “After the climate wars, a floating city was constructed in the Arctic Circle. Once a remarkable feat of mechanical and social engineering, it has started to crumble under the weight of its own decay – crime and corruption have set in, a terrible new disease is coursing untreated through the population, and the contradictions of incredible wealth alongside deepest poverty are spawning unrest. Into this turmoil comes a strange new visitor – a woman accompanied by an orca and a chained polar bear. She disappears into the crowds looking for someone she lost thirty years ago, followed by whispers of a vanished people who could bond with animals. Her arrival draws together four people and sparks a chain of events that will lead to unprecedented acts of resistance.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Before Mars : a Planetfall novel / Emma Newman. “After months of travel, Anna Kubrin finally arrives on Mars for her new job as a geologist and de facto artist-in-residence. Already she feels like she is losing the connection with her husband and baby at home on Earth–and she’ll be on Mars for over a year. Throwing herself into her work, she tries her best to fit in with the team. But in her new room on the base, Anna finds a mysterious note written in her own handwriting, warning her not to trust the colony psychologist. A note she can’t remember writing. Anna begins to suspect that her assignment isn’t as simple as she was led to believe. Is she caught up in an elaborate corporate conspiracy, or is she actually losing her mind?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The hyena and the hawk / Adrian Tchaikovsky. “From the depths of myth an ancient enemy has returned: the Plague People, whose very presence obliterates whole villages; whose terror destroys minds. In their wake, nothing is left of the people, not their places, not their ways. On the plains, the warriors and the wise of all tribes gather to confront the aggressor. Loud Thunder leads his great war-host south, even as Tecumet and Asman head north with the Sun River army. With Maniye Many Tracks, they plan to forge a new unity between the tribes such as the world has never seen. But will it be enough to stave off an oblivion that might devour even their gods?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Ascendant / Jack Campbell. “In the three years since former fleet officer Rob Geary and former Marine Mele Darcy led improvised forces to repel attacks on the newly settled world of Glenlyon, tensions have only gotten worse. When one of Glenlyon’s warships is blown apart trying to break the blockade that has isolated the world from the rest of human-colonized space, only the destroyer Saber remains to defend it from another attack. Geary’s decision to take Saber to the nearby star Kosatka to safeguard a diplomatic mission is a risky interpretation of his orders, to say the least. When a “peacekeeping force” carrying thousands of enemy soldiers arrives in Kosatka’s star system, the people of that world face an apparently hopeless battle to retain their freedom. It’s said that the best defense is a good offense. But even if a bold and risky move succeeds, Geary and Darcy may not survive it…” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) One way / S. J. Morden. “Andy Weir’s The Martian meets Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None in this edge-of-your-seat science fiction thriller about one man’s fight for survival on a planet where everyone’s a killer. Frank Kittridge is serving life for murdering his son’s drug dealer, so when he’s offered a deal by Xenosystems Operations – the corporation that owns the prison – he takes it. He’s been selected to help build the first permanent base on Mars. Unfortunately, his crewmates are just as guilty of their crimes as he is. As the convicts set to work on the frozen wastes of Mars, the accidents multiply.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Oversleeper [paperback] “What do you do when you wake up one morning and find that everything you know has changed? On Monday morning Ignatius Inuus finds himself on the run in a New York he barely recognises. Helped by a mysterious young woman, he starts to learn about the new regime. And, the brutal society – in which people survive at the expense of their humanity – seems to be more nightmare than dream. In his quest to force change, he discovers that when you possess the power of life or death over people, choosing life is not as simple as it seems.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • For Michel Barnier - Some Help from Rudyard Kipling (1909)
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • THE PUZZLER The Celt in all his variants from Builth to Ballyhoo,His mental processes are plain--one knows what he will do,And can logically predicate his finish by his start;But the English--ah, the English!--they are quite a race apart. Their psychology is bovine, their outlook crude and raw.They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw;But the straw that they were tickled with-the chaff that they were fed with--They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with. For undemocratic reasons and for motives not of  State,They  arrive  at  their  conclusions--largely  inarticulate.Being void of self-expression they confide their views to none;But sometimes in a smoking-room,  one learns why things were done. Yes, sometimes in a smoking-room, through clouds of "Ers" an "Ums,"Obliquely  and by inference,  illumination  comes,On some step that they have taken, or some action they approveEmbellished with the argot of the Upper Fourth Remove. In telegraphic sentences  half nodded to their friends,They hint a matter's inwardness--and there the matter ends.And while the Celt is talking from Valencia to  Kirkwall,The English--ah, the English!--don't say anything at all.

    • Find a new favourite in our contemporary fiction picks
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • The picks of the contemporary fiction this month feature a range of authors who work will enfold or re-enfold you in their worlds. They include debut novelists recommended for their construction and characters and a reprint of an Australian author’s exploration of mortality. Some of these authors are award winners or listed for literary prizes. Intrigue, insight, deception, mystery, invention and sardonic humour can be found in the library’s new fiction additions. Tangerine / Christine Mangan. “Obsession intersects two love triangles in this tale of devotion gone wrong. Twisted passion, perceived betrayal, and a fight for survival are written into the exotic, colourful, and dangerous backdrop of 1950s Tangier, Morocco. Alice Shipley and Lucy Mason are introverted college roommates who quickly become best friends. But when Alice finds romance with Tom, odd things happen, ending with a car accident that tears their lives apart. Trying to forget Lucy and their tainted past, Alice marries a man she hardly knows and moves to Tangier–a place that holds the promise of adventure laced with the thrill of danger but that proves too threatening for Alice. When Lucy discovers that Alice’s marriage is far from happy, she decides to rescue the woman she’d loved in college, once again claiming her as her own.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Adjustment day / Chuck Palahniuk. “People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning. Adjustment Day, the author’s first novel in four years, is an ingeniously comic work in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. When Adjustment Day arrives, it fearlessly makes real the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact, and conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche.” (Syndetics summary) Frankenstein in Baghdad : a novel / Ahmed Saadawi ; translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright. “From the rubble-strewn streets of U.S.-occupied Baghdad, Hadi–a scavenger and an oddball fixture at a local café–collects human body parts and stitches them together to create a corpse. His goal, he claims, is for the government to recognize the parts as people and to give them proper burial. But when the corpse goes missing, a wave of eerie murders sweeps the city, and reports stream in of a horrendous-looking criminal who, though shot, cannot be killed. Hadi soon realizes he’s created a monster, one that needs human flesh to survive–first from the guilty, and then from anyone in its path.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The executor / Blake Morrison. “What matters most: marriage or friendship? fidelity or art? the wishes of the living or the talents of the dead? Matt Holmes finds himself considering these questions sooner than he thinks when his friend, the poet Robert Pope, dies unexpectedly. Bestselling novelist and poet Blake Morrison creates a biting portrait of competitive male friendship, sexual obsession and the fragile transactions of married life. The Executor innovatively interweaves poetry and prose to form a gripping literary detective story.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary). The eight mountains / Paolo Cognetti ; translated from the Italian by Simon Carnell and Erica Segre. “The international sensation about two young Italian boys from different backgrounds who meet in the mountains every summer, and the men they grow to become. Pietro, a lonely city boy, spends his childhood summers in a secluded valley in the Alps. Bruno, the cowherd son of a local stonemason, knows the mountains intimately. A modern Italian masterpiece, The Eight Mountains is a lyrical coming-of-age story spanning three decades; a novel about the power of male friendships and a meditation on loyalty, being in nature, and finding one’s place in the world.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Property : stories between two novellas / Lionel Shriver. “A striking new collection of ten short stories and two novellas that explores the idea of property in every meaning of the word. Lionel Shriver’s first collection explores property in both senses of the word: real estate and stuff. These pieces illustrate how our possessions act as proxies for ourselves, in Lionel Shriver’s world, we may possess people and objects and places, but in turn they possess us. Exhibiting a satisfying thematic unity unusual for a collection, this masterful work showcases the biting insight that has made Shriver one of the most acclaimed writers of our time.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Folk / Zoe Gilbert. “The remote island village of Neverness is a world far from our time and place. The air hangs rich with the coconut-scent of gorse and the salty bite of the sea. Harsh winds scour the rocky coastline. The villagers’ lives are inseparable from nature and its enchantments. Tales of this island community interweave over the course of a generation, their earthy desires, resentments, idle gossip and painful losses create a staggeringly original world. Verlyn Webbe, born with a wing for an arm, unfurls his feathers in defiance of past shame; Plum is snatched by a water bull and dragged to his lair; little Crab Skerry takes his first run through the gorse-maze; Madden sleepwalks through violent storms, haunted by horses and her father’s wishes.” (Syndetics summary) Breath / Tim Winton. “When paramedic Bruce Pike is called out to deal with another teenage adventure gone wrong, he knows better than his colleague, better than the kid’s parents, what happened and how. Thirty years before, that dead boy could have been him. A relentlessly gripping and deeply moving novel about the damage you do to yourself when you’re young and think you’re immortal. Originally published in 2008.” (Syndetics summary) Dead men’s trousers / Irvine Welsh. “Mark Renton is finally a success. An international jet-setter, he now makes significant money managing DJs, but the constant travel, airport lounges, soulless hotel rooms and broken relationships have left him dissatisfied with his life. He’s then rocked by a chance encounter with Frank Begbie, who appears to have reinvented himself as a celebrated artist. Sick Boy and Spud are intrigued to learn that their old friends are back in town, but when they enter the bleak world of organ-harvesting, things start to go so badly wrong. One of these four will not survive to the end of this book. Which one of them is wearing Dead Men’s Trousers?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Twisted prey / John Sandford.Twisted Prey “Taryn Grant had run successfully for the U.S. Senate, where Lucas had predicted she’d fit right in. He was also convinced that she’d been responsible for three murders, though he’d never been able to prove it. Once a psychopath had gotten that kind of rush, though, he or she often needed another fix, so he figured he might be seeing her again. He was right. A federal marshal now, with a very wide scope of investigation, he’s heard rumours that Grant has found her seat on the Senate intelligence committee, and the contacts she’s made from it, to be very…useful.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Panic room / Robert Goddard. “Sometimes the danger is on the inside… High on a Cornish cliff sits a vast uninhabited mansion, uninhabited except for Blake, a young woman of dubious background, secretive and alone, currently acting as house sitter. The house has a panic room. Even Blake doesn’t know it’s there. She’s too busy being on the run from life, from a story she thinks she’s escaped. But her remote existence is going to be invaded when people come looking for the house’s owner, missing rogue pharma entrepreneur, Jack Harkness.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary). The woman in the woods / John Connolly. “The new thrilling instalment of John Connolly’s popular Charlie Parker series. It is spring, and the semi-preserved body of a young Jewish woman is discovered buried in the Maine woods. It is clear that she gave birth shortly before her death. But there is no sign of a baby. Private detective Charlie Parker is engaged by the lawyer Moxie Castin to shadow the police investigation and find the infant, but Parker is not the only searcher. Someone else is following the trail left by the woman, someone with an interest in more than a missing child, someone prepared to leave bodies in his wake. And in a house by the woods, a toy telephone begins to ring. For a young boy is about to receive a call from a dead woman…” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Due to ice on the overheads this morning, some services across Kapiti and Hutt Valley lines are experiencing delays.
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Due to ice on the overheads this morning, some services across Kapiti and Hutt Valley lines are experiencing delays.We are currently experiencing delays on some services this morning: Hutt Valley LineNorthbound:The 5.50am service from Wellington to Upper Hutt is currently delayed by 23 minutes. Southbound:Kapiti Line:Northbound:The 5.52am service from Wellington to Waikanae is currently delayed by 13 minutes. Southbound:The 5.30am service from Waikanae to Wellington is currently delayed by 25 minutes. The 6.14am service from Plimmerton to Wellington is currently delayed by 15 minutes. Note: Please take extra care when walking on the platforms this morning as we have had reports of some icy conditions. Stay warm! We will keep you updated on delayed services. This affects these services: HVL KPL MEL

    • Local to international: New CDs
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Check out some of these newly catalogued CDs in our AV collection including the fantastic new albums by Kimbra and Arctic Monkeys. The gorgeous box-set by Procol Harum and the 30th anniversary edition of Bruce Springsteen’s classic Born To Run offer rare footage as well. We have a lot of box-sets and they keep coming. Come in and check them out! Arctic Monkeys – Tranquility Base hotel + casino “To the fact that Alex Turner was a mere 32 years old when he unleashed Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino onto the world, a young age that seems older because Arctic Monkeys released their debut when he was just 19. Throughout Tranquility Base, Turner comes across as if he were much, much older than his actual age, cocking an eyebrow to a potential paramour who has the audacity to have never seen Blade Runner, and reminiscing about the ’70s — a decade he never saw.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz) Janelle Monae – Dirty computer “2018 release, the third studio album by singer Janelle Monáe. Dirty Computer is the follow up to her critically acclaimed studio albums, The ArchAndroid (2010) and The Electric Lady (2013). Includes the singles ‘Make Me Feel’ and ‘Django Jane’.” (adapted from mightyape.co.nz) Laurie Anderson – Landfall “The piece, which was inspired by Anderson’s experience of Hurricane Sandy, is the first collaboration between the iconic storyteller/musician and the groundbreaking string quartet, who perform together on the recording. Landfall juxtaposes lush electronics and strings with Anderson’s powerful descriptions of loss, from water-logged pianos to disappearing animal species to Dutch karaoke bars.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Kimbra – Primal heart “For her follow-up to The Golden Echo, Kimbra could have expanded on any one of its eclectic sounds. Instead, on Primal Heart she combines all of the styles she explored on that album into a more cohesive — and immediate — approach. A consistently winning album, Primal Heart finds Kimbra hitting the sweet spot between imagination and accessibility — if her nods to the mainstream get more ears pointed her way, so much the better.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz) Delaney Davidson – Shining day “Delaney Davidson looks wryly at the packed suitcase, nailing the last things into place for his 2018 migration. It was supposed to be a year of settling in but the world has other plans for him, starting with his new album release. 50 days into 2018 and Davidson has ticked off a 6 song writing session with SJD (Sean James Donnelly), album production for Belladonna (Lytteltons black metal doom band). UK label Glass Records Redux (Spaceman 3, Spiritualized) has picked up Shining Day his 9th solo album. It has been 2 ½ years since the release of his last studio album Lucky Guy.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Julia Deans – We light fire “With the release of bold first single ‘Walking In The Sun’ in September 2017, Julia Deans whet the appetite of fans and critics alike for her new album. The album has been recorded in a home studio in Northcote, Auckland, which Julia’s partner David Wernham built over the course of six months 2011, and she began writing the songs not long after. While writing the songs was a very solo pursuit, the recording of them was less so, with Deans working closely with Wernham on “pulling the musical story together”.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Procol Harum – Still there’ll be more : an anthology 1967-2017 “This eight disc set comprises five CDs and three DVDs, of which the first three discs draw upon the key tracks from Procol Harum’s illustrious career. Disc four features the band’s legendary concert at the Hollywood Bowl on 21 September 1973, whilst disc five features a previously unreleased concert at the Bournemouth Winter Gardens on 17 March 1976. Still There’ll Be More is the most elaborate celebration of Procol Harum’s music released to date and this deluxe boxed set is a fine tribute to fifty years of one of Britain’s greatest bands.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Miles Davis – The final tour : the bootleg series vol. 6 “The latest entry in the award-winning Miles Davis Bootleg Series focuses on the final chapter in the landmark collaboration between Davis and saxophonist John Coltrane: their last live performances together, in Europe in the spring of 1960. These historic performances marked Miles and Trane’s last outing together and showcased both musicians’ incredible influence on the changing sound of jazz. The beautiful music they made together is presented here officially for the very first time.” (adapted from amazon.com) The Who – Live at the Fillmore East 1968 “April 2018 – the 50th anniversary of these legendary unreleased recordings from the Fillmore East, New York City, Friday April 5 & Saturday April 6, 1968. Both nights were recorded by Who manager Kit Lambert with the intention of releasing as the Who’s fourth album after Sell Out and before Tommy. Remastered for optimum sound quality, this will enhance The Who’s reputation as the best live act of the time, regarded by fans as something of a ‘holy grail’ in live shows.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk) Bruce Springsteen – Born to run “Personally supervised by Bruce Springsteen and Jon Landau, the bookset includes Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75, an astonishing film of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band’s legendary 1975 concert at the Hammersmith Odeon in London; the new film Wings for Wheels: The Making of Born to Run; the classic album in remastered cd form; and finally, a 48 page booklet of previously unpublished photographs. With its two DVDs, the package offers approximately four hours of previously unseen footage.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

    • Newsletter
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Clyde Quay School
      • 20 June 2018 CQS Newsletter

    • Newsletter
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Clyde Quay School
      • 20 June 2018 CQS Newsletter

    • Selected picks from our latest graphic novels
      • 21 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • There is a rich diversity in this month’s graphic novel picks, from continuations of acclaimed series such as Arthur De Pins’ The Revolution of the Crabs to historic seminal cult works such as the DC House of Horror anthology to a wonderful graphic novel celebrating the rebel ladies who rocked the world. All in all it’s a rich cornucopia with works to suit all tastes. The death of Stalin / writer, Fabien Nury ; artist, Thierry Robin. “On March 1, 1953, the Secretary General of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Joseph Stalin, had a severe stroke. A doctor could not be called until the Central Committee had convened, voted, and agreed on which doctor to use, a task made more complex by the fact that Stalin had just ordered the deaths of many of the Soviet Union’s leading physicians. And so began the bureaucratic merry-go-round that became the intense and underhanded struggle for control of a nation.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The green hand and other stories / Nicole Claveloux with Edith Zha ; introduction by Daniel Clowes ; translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith. “Nicole Claveloux’s short stories–originally published in the late 1970s and never before collected in English–are among the most beautiful comics ever drawn: whimsical, intoxicating, with the freshness and splendor of dreams. In hallucinatory colour or elegant black-and-white, she brings us into lands that are strange but oddly recognizable, filled with murderous grandmothers and lonely city dwellers, bad-tempered vegetables and walls that are surprisingly easy to fall through. This new selection, designed and introduced by Daniel Clowes, presents the full achievement of an unforgettable, unjustly neglected master of French comics.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Orion’s outcasts / Corbeyran & Jorge Miguel ; Corbeyran, writer ; Jorge Miguel, artist & colorist ; Mark Bence, translator. “Now, instead of Kolhen’s warrior tattoo, the young man wears the mark of the rejected, the ‘outcasts’ as they are known on the planet Absalon. Determined to prove his innocence and to get revenge on those who framed him, Kolhen escapes captivity with the help of the fiery Tryana, another of society’s pariahs. On his quest, Kolhen meets a mysterious woman with golden hair, who’s armed with strange and powerful weaponry, and who claims to be an envoy from another planet: Earth.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rashomon : a Commissioner Heigo Kobayashi case / story and art by Victor Santos ; translations by Katie LaBarbera. “Victor Santos (Polar, Violent Love) writes and illustrates a crime and mystery story inspired by Ryunosuke Akutagawa’s tales featuring the heroic commissioner Heigo Kobayashi. When the body of a skilled samurai is found along the road to Yamashina in feudal Japan, the search begins for his killer. Detective Heigo Kobayashi takes the case but finds only dead-end clues and no first-hand witnesses.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The walking dead. Volume 29, Lines we cross / Robert Kirkman, creator, writer ; Charlie Adlard, penciler ; Stefano Gaudiano, inker. “Recent events have thrown Alexandria into turmoil, and now Rick, Dwight, Eugene and Negan all have something to prove.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Brazen : rebel ladies who rocked the world / Pénélope Bagieu ; English translation by Montana Kane. “Throughout history and across the globe, one characteristic connects the daring women of Brazen : their indomitable spirit.With her characteristic wit and dazzling drawings, celebrated graphic novelist Pénélope Bagieu profiles the lives of these feisty female role models, some world famous, some little known. From Nellie Bly to Mae Jemison or Josephine Baker to Naziq al-Abid, the stories in this comic biography are sure to inspire the next generation of rebel ladies.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The Hellblazer. Vol. 3, The inspiration game / Tim Seeley, Richard Kadrey, writers ; Jesús Merino, Davide Fabbri, José Marzán Jr., artists. “Death doesn’t just become John Constantine–it shadows the poor bastard’s every step, from his home turf of London to the streets of San Francisco. What’s more, it has a nasty habit of striking where the DC Universe’s street-level sorcerer least expects it–like his dreams. After waking from a vengeful drunken nightmare, Constantine finds that a real-life murder has been committed. Could he have done the deed himself in a blacked-out rage? Or is some sinister force turning his subconscious mind into the ultimate untraceable weapon?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The march of the crabs [3] : the revolution of the crabs / written and illustrated by Arthur de Pins ; translated by Edward Gauvin. “The March of the Crabs concludes in the third volume of the Eisner Award-nominated series. Inhabiting the Gironde estuary, there is a race of crabs known for their strange defect: unable to evolve, they are condemned to spend their lives walking a single straight line. When Sunny, Boater, and Guitar, discovered a way to spur their biology and change directions, their bold moves broke the crabs into two clans: the rigid (who walk straight) and the turners (who change direction). Now, these two factions are prepared for battle as the other underwater creatures look on, ready to take a side. But the stunning rebellion comes in the crosshairs of another species on the brink of their own cataclysmic change of course… humanity.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Bullseye : the Colombian connection. “He’s a ruthless hitman who never misses, a deadly foe who can turn any object into a lethal weapon! But why is the Marvel Universe’s most dangerous assassin heading to Colombia to take aim at a drug cartel? Find out as Bullseye takes charge!” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rock Candy Mountain. Volume one / written & drawn by Kyle Starks. “It’s the first collection of the manic, hobo fighting epic that is Rock Candy Mountain. Come inside and meet the mysterious, unbeatable hobo Jackson on his quest to find the mythical hobo heaven. Meet his sidekick Pomona Slim. But watch out for the Devil! And the FBI! And the Hobo Mafia too! It’s a fantastical fisticuff frolic through post- World War II America via the rails and backroads through underground fight clubs, prison and the hobo jungles wrought with dangers, hobo fights, jokes and locomotive excitement.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Rom [3] : long roads to ruin / plot and script by Chris Ryall & Christos Gage ; art by David Messina ; pencils by Guy Dorian, Sr. ; inks by Michele Pasta and Sal Buscema. “Rom now has help in his war against the Dire Wraiths in the form of additional Solstar Knights and super-powered human allies both… so why is the battle going from bad to worse? The Wraiths’ master plan grows and Rom can’t even see it, let alone find any way to stop it.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Teo Reo: Whakapapa Poneke - Te Whare Tangata
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • TE REO – OUR PASSPORT OUT OF THE SWAMP Some years ago, I was irritated and saddened to hear an American visitor tell me that New Zealand was ‘just like one of the US states’. Of course, I expostulated - but I have myself at times quoted the fact that its population puts it in the same class [4-5 million] as South Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, Kentucky and Oregon. In happier times, being likened to Oregon was not the end of the world though most of us would jib and buck at being associated at all with The South. Nowadays, finding points of differentiation and accentuating them is becoming pressing if we want to preserve our standing as a beacon of common sense and civilized norms. And here we have been gifted with a truly wonderful treasure or taonga – the Maori language Teo Reo and the wonderful culture that it enfolds and displays. Hence my strong support for ongoing efforts to make more of our enormous Good Fortune. Capital city has a duty to lead the way with te reo Māori https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/104856474/capital-city-has-a-duty-to-lead-the-way-with-te-reo-mori As our Deputy Mayor Jill Day explains: Tōku reo, tōku ohooho,Tōku reo, tōku māpihi maureaTōku whakakai marihi Ngā kupu mai i te waiata He Kākano Āhau, nā Hohepa Tamehana ka whakarapopoto i te whai tikanga o Te Tauihu - te kaupapa here I te reo Māori o te Kaunihera o Pōneke. Ko te tino wawata mō tō tātou tāone, mō Aotearoa hoki, kia kōrerotia, kia rangona,kia kitea i te reo Māori, ahakoa nō hea koe ahakoa ko wai rānei. Mā tēnei kaupapa here e āwhina, e ārahi i a mātou i roto i ngā mahi o te Kaunihera, pera atu ki ngā kaupapa here o tātou. Ka whakawhanake i te mahere mahi ki te taha o mana whenua, o te hunga whai pānga hoki, kia mōhio ai tātou me pēhea te tutuki i te wawata nei. Ā muri i te reanga tuatahi ka ngaro ai te reo, ko te whakaaro e toru reanga ki mua te roanga kia whakarauora i te reo. Mō tātou e ako ana ki te kōrero i tenei wa, ehara mo tātou noaiho engari mō ngā tamariki me ngā mokopuna, kia whai wāhi rātou ki te ako, ki te kōrero, ki te tupu ake i roto i te reo Māori. Mena kāore tātou e tutuki I tēnei mahi inaianei, ka waiho mā te reanga e whai kia otia. Ka kitea e tātou i te nama o ngā tangata Pākeha e ako ana, e tatari ana ki te ako i te reo Māori, anā he hiahia nui ki te kite i te puāwaitanga o te reo. Kua whakaae anō hoki ngā tangata o Pōneke – 94 ōrau – kia mahia te mahi, kia whai hua ngā wawata nei o mātou o te Kaunihera. Kia mārama ai – ehara tēnei i te takahi mana i te reo Pākeha kia tū tētahi ki runga i tētahi atu. Engari kia whai mana ngā reo e rua ki tēnei whenua. Ko te reo Māori he reo whaimana ā-ture nō Aotearoa, ā koia me tū kaha te mana o te reo Māori ki te taha o te reo Pākeha. He wāhi tino motuhake tō te reo Māori ki te ahurei o Aotearoa, ki te tuakiri hoki mō tātou katoa e noho ana ki te whenua nei. Nā te mea ko Pōneke te tāone matua, he hōnore tēnei ki te arahi i tenei mahi nui ki te taha o mana whenua. Which brings me back to a poem that I published 29 September 2013: TAKING ON WATER AS I TACK HOME Up at the bar, the timber looks new Shiny, stripped back and light in colour. I have moored my yawl on reclaimed land And set my money down for an IPA Here at our oldest pub, The Thistle. As I enter, a sign claims ‘Founded 1840’ And I browse between the prints and photos Showing the building’s sepia history, Circumnavigating a table of bright young things - And a dark lady in the corner. She notices my trawling and asks Are you interested in the past? She brings her drink and then her hand bag over And we sit and share a conversation At first about the Wearable Arts Show. Soon, we share common ground at the shore And I remind her that the great Chief Te Rauparaha Used to drag his waka up the muddy beach And order a whiskey or two, while chatting to the whalers, Yarning stories about his kids and his massacres. Then we exchange names at which she is playfully precise: "Hine Mahoney but you can call me Jenny - Don’t say Maloney - don’t say baloney. You say you are a writer, let’s do rounds of poems”. This more or less was one of mine. When it has come to my advantage, I call‘The Love of My Life’ to tie the rondeau. She responds - dreamily, insistently "My whakapapa: for I am wāhine atua From te whare tangata (the doorway of life). They took our language not just our land”. ...I chide them for her, the Founding Fathers: The only country in the world founded By Real Estate Agents, who divided before they grew - Still speculating on a housing or a dairy boom. Therefore my mistress’ eyes are raven black.In the old age black was not counted fair Or if it were, it bore not beauty’s name; But now is black beauty’s successive heir, That every tongue says beauty should look so. The fisherman has tide and fish to catchThe sea has beach and cliff to own The heart breasts waves that ebb and die Swimming deep it falters by and by And those who grieve are oft bereft alone Two is my limit, I’m afraid -I don’t want to wrap the car round a lamp post. My young sons were overwrought from The school production and set to watch a Pokemon film And there is a 20:20 later tonight from India.

    • New books in the library’s NZ collection
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Come for the quiet reading spaces on the second floor at Central Library and find something interesting amongst these selected new books of the New Zealand collection. This month you can find studies of love and loss, study our kiwi language and our literature, find out how a graffiti project became a monument and find new insights into Pacifica history from Cook to the dawn raids. How we met : the ways great love begins… / Michèle A’Court. “How We Met is based on a collection of ‘How We Met’ stories – those lovely stories couples love to tell (and we all love to hear) about how they got together – The author’s theory: that these stories of how couples meet – the romantic, absurd, serendipitous, convoluted, scandalous, breath-taking moments of connection – help to weave their lives together. Partly as ‘proof’ that they were meant to begin this couple-journey, and also because in each retelling they go back to those first falling-in-love feelings and rekindle the passion. Michele then tests her theory out on a neuroscientist and a psychologist, and by the end of the book has some useful things to say not only about how great love starts, but how it stays great.” (Syndetics summary) Sorrows of a century : interpreting suicide in New Zealand, 1900-2000 / John C. Weaver. “Focusing on New Zealand because it has the most comprehensive and accessible coroners’ records, Weaver analyzes a staggering amount of information to determine the social and cultural factors that contribute to suicide rates. He examines the country’s investigations into sudden deaths, places them within the context of major events and societal changes, and turns to witnesses’ statements, suicide notes, and medical records to remark on prevention strategies.” (Publisher information) Kiwi speak / Justin Brown. “Do you speak Nu Zild? In Kiwi Speak, bestselling author Justin Brown eavesdrops at the dinner table, the school yard, the farm and the sports club to bring us an entertaining dictionary of phrases and expressions – the often hilarious, sometimes baffling New Zealandisms we use in everyday life.” (Syndetics summary) Poetry and Exile : Letters from New Zealand 1938-1948 “German-Jewish poet Karl Wolfskehl spent the last years of his life, from 1938 to 1948, in Auckland, New Zealand, on the globe’s last island reef, as a refugee from Nazi Germany. The conditions of his life forced him to consider the very nature of human existence, and his letters from New Zealand amount to an intellectual autobiography. During his Auckland years Wolfskehl got to know the formative generation of New Zealand writers:Frank Sargeson, R. A. K. Mason, A. R. D. Fairburn (who dedicated his Poems 1929-1941 to Wolfskehl),Denis Glover and the acolytes of the Caxton Press and, to a lesser degree, Allen Curnow.” (Syndetics summary) The Bulford Kiwi : the kiwi we left behind / Colleen Brown. “Little known story from after WW1, when NZ troops waited months in Sling Camp in southern England after the war ended to get a ship home. Rioting in the camp led to plans to keep troops busy by cutting a giant Kiwi into the chalk hill behind the camp. The Bulford Kiwi has become a monument built by soldiers, not governments, for themselves and their mates. In 2017 the Bulford Kiwi was made a protected heritage site by UK government.” (Syndetics summary) Discoveries : the voyages of Captain Cook / Nicholas Thomas. “Cook’s great voyages marked the end of an era in world history. As he sailed into Hawaii in January 1778 he made contact with the last of the human civilizations to grow up independently of the rest of the world. But equally for the Polynesians and Melanesians of the Pacific, Cook’s arrival in their midst merely marked a further (if disastrous) twist in diverse histories already many centuries old. In this immensely enjoyable and absorbing book Cook’s journeys are reimagined, attempting to leave behind (or master) our later preoccupations to let us see what Cook and his associates experienced and what the societies he encountered experienced.” (Syndetics summary) Dawn Raids “Tension is rising in 1970s New Zealand. Muldoon’s government is cracking down on illegal immigration and the notorious dawn raids are ripping Pasifika families from their beds. At the eye of this political storm, everyday New Zealanders like Sione struggle to keep their families united. Fuarosa, the family’s resident overstayer, fights against the chaos to keep hold of her freedom, and Sione’s sister Teresa might be getting in too deep with black rights activists. First staged in 1997, Dawn Raids is just as confronting and relevant now as it has ever been. Oscar Kightley pulls no punches and brings the play to life with his trademark hilarity and wit.” (Syndetics summary) Seek and destroy : the history of 3 Squadron RNZAF / Paul Harrison. “In 2015 No.3 Squadron Royal New Zealand Air Force celebrated 50 years of continuous helicopter operations since it reformed in August 1965. Seek and Destroy is the official history of the machines and personnel that make up the colourful and wide-ranging operations of this unique squadron, which was first formed in 1930 and whose aircraft and personnel have seen service all around the world from the UK to Asia, the Pacific and the Antarctic. This illustrated hardback brings together anecdotal stories of the operations and exercises conducted during the past 50 years, including numerous civil defence and peacekeeping activities.” (Syndetics summary) The New Zealand Wars / Philippa Werry. “The story of the 19th century New Zealand Wars, a part of New Zealand’s history that many people wish they knew more about. The book describes how the wars came about, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and how they affected women and children. It explains the emergence of Kīngitanga or Māori King movement, the land confiscations and the story of Parihaka. The story is told in an accessible way full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.” (Publisher description) Towards democratic renewal : ideas for constitutional change in New Zealand / Geoffrey Palmer and Andrew Butler, with assistance from Scarlet Roberts. “In 2016, Sir Geoffrey Palmer and Andrew Butler proposed and published a written, codified constitution for Aotearoa New Zealand. Since then the authors have travelled the country, discussing with the public the nature of New Zealand’s identity and where the country is headed. This clear, revised constitution defines and entrenches government accountability and transparency, protects the rights of our peoples and tangata whenua, and offers transformative steps to uphold the sovereignty and integrity of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Publisher information)

    • Milan Mrkusich (1925-2018) Chromatic Investigator
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • Today – a guest post from regular reader and commenter, Starkive, on one of New Zealand’s best modern artists: Not strictly a Wellington figure, but surely a nationally important one in painting, design and architecture, Milan Mrkusich, has died at 93. Along with the likes of McCahon, Angus and Wollaston (although never really part of the club) Mrkusich and his erstwhile confederate Gordon Walters defined the idea of a thoroughly New Zealand contemporary artist in the 1940s and 50s. He arrived at pure abstraction before all of them and pursued it with a stern rigour which somehow left plenty of room for subtlety and light. Whatever he made seemed to draw on a profound immersion in colour. From his first show at the Auckland School of Architecture in 1949, his work frequently crossed into architecture. He collaborated extensively with Brenner Associates, including Vladimir Cacala, Stephen Jelicich, Desmond Mullen and John Butterworth, providing furniture and interiors for a number of significant Brenner projects. Most notably, he designed and built his own house in Remuera – a key moment in the development of New Zealand domestic modernism. He also produced a number of large-scale public works, including a personal favourite, the BJ Ball mural in Auckland, and the one best known to Wellington, the Te Papa wall of glass. The scope of his ambition and influence was demonstrated at the Auckland Art Gallery’s blockbuster 1950s Show in 1992, where he had a section all to himself, as well as featuring in the design, architecture and painting sections Artist John Reynolds, a Mrkusich admirer of long standing, described his death as “the end of that Twentieth Century contemplation”.

    • New sci fi and fantasy selections
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • This month’s featured science fiction and fantasy novels are selected from our wide range of new acquisitions, and include a series conclusion from Elizabeth May and a future cop mystery from award-winning author John Scalzi. There are also several novels that weave into their plots such themes as mining, alternative medieval Britain and bleak dystopian cities. All will ensure fascinating, thrilling reading. Head on / John Scalzi. “John Scalzi returns with Head On, the standalone follow-up to the critically acclaimed Lock In. Hilketa is a frenetic and violent pastime where players attack each other with swords and hammers. The main goal of the game: obtain your opponent’s head and carry it through the goalposts. With flesh and bone bodies, a sport like this would be impossible. But all the players are “threeps,” robot-like bodies controlled by people with Haden’s Syndrome, so anything goes. No one gets hurt, but the brutality is real and the crowds love it. Until a star athlete drops dead on the playing field. Is it an accident or murder? FBI agents and Haden-related crime investigators, Chris Shane and Leslie Vann, are called in to uncover the truth–and in doing so travel to the darker side of the fast-growing sport of Hilketa, where players and owners do whatever it takes to win, on and off the field.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The fallen kingdom / Elizabeth May. “My name is Lady Aileana Kameron. First the fae murdered my mother. Then they destroyed my world. Then one of them killed me. Now I’m fighting for more than revenge. The long-awaited final book in the Falconer trilogy is an imaginative tour-de-force that will thrill fans of the series. Aileana Kameron, resurrected by ancient fae magic, returns to the world she once knew with no memory of her past and with dangerous powers she struggles to control. Desperate to break the curse that pits two factions of the fae against, her only hope is hidden in an ancient book guarded by the legendary Morrigan, a faery of immense power and cruelty.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Earthcore / Scott Sigler. “Deep below a desolate Utah mountain lies the largest platinum deposit ever discovered. A billion-dollar find, it waits for any company that can drill a world’s record, three-mile-deep mine shaft. EarthCore is the company with the technology, the resources and the guts to go after the mother lode. Young executive Connell Kirkland is the company’s driving force, pushing himself and those around him to uncover the massive treasure. But at three miles below the surface, where the rocks are so hot they burn bare skin, something has been waiting for centuries. Waiting … and guarding. Kirkland and EarthCore are about to find out firsthand why this treasure has never been unearthed.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The wolf / Leo Carlew. “Carlew’s debut novel presents an alternate medieval Britain in which the isle of Albion is shared by human Saxons and two races of giants: the incredibly long-lived Anakim and the larger and rarer Unhieru. The uneasy peace between the southern Saxon kingdom and the Black Kingdom of the Anakim is broken as the Sutherners invade, scoring an unexpected victory and killing the current Black Lord. The novel follows both the Anakim heir, Roper, as he attempts to defend the kingdom from invasion while dealing with rivals for the throne, and the leader of the southern invasion, Bellamus, a commoner attempting to not only destroy the Anakim but also secure his own advancement.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Blackfish City / Sam J. Miller. “After the climate wars, a floating city was constructed in the Arctic Circle. Once a remarkable feat of mechanical and social engineering, it has started to crumble under the weight of its own decay – crime and corruption have set in, a terrible new disease is coursing untreated through the population, and the contradictions of incredible wealth alongside deepest poverty are spawning unrest. Into this turmoil comes a strange new visitor – a woman accompanied by an orca and a chained polar bear. She disappears into the crowds looking for someone she lost thirty years ago, followed by whispers of a vanished people who could bond with animals. Her arrival draws together four people and sparks a chain of events that will lead to unprecedented acts of resistance.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Before Mars : a Planetfall novel / Emma Newman. “After months of travel, Anna Kubrin finally arrives on Mars for her new job as a geologist and de facto artist-in-residence. Already she feels like she is losing the connection with her husband and baby at home on Earth–and she’ll be on Mars for over a year. Throwing herself into her work, she tries her best to fit in with the team. But in her new room on the base, Anna finds a mysterious note written in her own handwriting, warning her not to trust the colony psychologist. A note she can’t remember writing. Anna begins to suspect that her assignment isn’t as simple as she was led to believe. Is she caught up in an elaborate corporate conspiracy, or is she actually losing her mind?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The hyena and the hawk / Adrian Tchaikovsky. “From the depths of myth an ancient enemy has returned: the Plague People, whose very presence obliterates whole villages; whose terror destroys minds. In their wake, nothing is left of the people, not their places, not their ways. On the plains, the warriors and the wise of all tribes gather to confront the aggressor. Loud Thunder leads his great war-host south, even as Tecumet and Asman head north with the Sun River army. With Maniye Many Tracks, they plan to forge a new unity between the tribes such as the world has never seen. But will it be enough to stave off an oblivion that might devour even their gods?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Ascendant / Jack Campbell. “In the three years since former fleet officer Rob Geary and former Marine Mele Darcy led improvised forces to repel attacks on the newly settled world of Glenlyon, tensions have only gotten worse. When one of Glenlyon’s warships is blown apart trying to break the blockade that has isolated the world from the rest of human-colonized space, only the destroyer Saber remains to defend it from another attack. Geary’s decision to take Saber to the nearby star Kosatka to safeguard a diplomatic mission is a risky interpretation of his orders, to say the least. When a “peacekeeping force” carrying thousands of enemy soldiers arrives in Kosatka’s star system, the people of that world face an apparently hopeless battle to retain their freedom. It’s said that the best defense is a good offense. But even if a bold and risky move succeeds, Geary and Darcy may not survive it…” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) One way / S. J. Morden. “Andy Weir’s The Martian meets Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None in this edge-of-your-seat science fiction thriller about one man’s fight for survival on a planet where everyone’s a killer. Frank Kittridge is serving life for murdering his son’s drug dealer, so when he’s offered a deal by Xenosystems Operations – the corporation that owns the prison – he takes it. He’s been selected to help build the first permanent base on Mars. Unfortunately, his crewmates are just as guilty of their crimes as he is. As the convicts set to work on the frozen wastes of Mars, the accidents multiply.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Oversleeper [paperback] “What do you do when you wake up one morning and find that everything you know has changed? On Monday morning Ignatius Inuus finds himself on the run in a New York he barely recognises. Helped by a mysterious young woman, he starts to learn about the new regime. And, the brutal society – in which people survive at the expense of their humanity – seems to be more nightmare than dream. In his quest to force change, he discovers that when you possess the power of life or death over people, choosing life is not as simple as it seems.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

    • Swimming sports: Year 4-6
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Year 4-6 Swimming Sports will be held Tawa Pool on Thursday 5th July (last Thursday of term) Again this year due to our large numbers, we will have two separate swimming sports. Year 4-6 students will have swimming sports this term, Thursday 5th July.  Year 1-3 swimming sports will be held after they have had their swimming lessons next term. We have an 11am-2:30pm slot of time booked at Tawa Pool; however we anticipate that the majority of races will be completed quite quickly. We recommend that spectators arrive for 11am rather than later in that block of time in order not to miss their child's races. For Year 4-6 students the races will be held in the main pool and the teaching pool. Students will opt into races that will either be full length in the main pool, or half length (the teaching pool). We also check with their Easyswim levels to see whether they have chosen the appropriate lengths for their races. Teachers will use the results from swimming sports to form the team for the Northern Zone swimming competition. As swimming has been part of our PE programme this term, we will be asking all students to enter at least two events in their swimming sports; we encourage students to opt into as many races as they can. Students will have the chance to opt into their events this week. For swimming sports all students will need to bring togs, a towel, a swimming cap and goggles. Swimming always makes students very hungry, so lots of healthy snacks would also be a good idea. You are all most welcome to come along and support students in this event - cheerleaders always help! If you have any questions about these events you can email Georgia Poole - georgia@amesbury.school.nz or contact your child's whanau teacher. We look forward to seeing you all there! By Rachael van Rij

    • School Notices: 20-27 June
      • 20 Jun 2018
      • Amesbury Drive School Establishment Board of Trustees
      • Everything you need to know around and about school for the coming week. REMINDER: Mufti Day - this Friday! Koru hub have initiated a Mufti Day THIS Friday, 22 June for all Amesbury students. It is a gold coin donation and proceeds will go to the Wellington Children's Hospital. What a great initiative Koru Hub. The theme is "stars & space" so please encourage your kids to dress in theme if they can! Upcoming payment deadlines: Term 3 co-curricular lessons: payment due by Fri 22 June to secure places. 2018 Ski Camp - deposit must be paid by 23rd June (only applicable for those students who have already been selected to attend)Term 3 swimming (year 1-3 students): payment due by 20th July, please make a note in your calendar to pay by this date.2018 School Donation - we've only received a donation from about 50% of our school families. If you haven't already supported the school in this way, please make your donation as soon as possible via the online shop, under the "School Donation" section.Matariki Breakfast gold coin donation - if you didn't make a donation on the day, you can still drop this into reception. A donation box will be on the office bench all this week... Expressions of Interest - Individual singing lessons We have the possibility of including individual singing lessons as part of our co-curricular offering. If you have a child that may be interested in pursuing this, can you please email Rachael van Rij on communications@amesbury.school.nz as soon as possible.  Please note, at this stage these would be individual lessons for 30 minutes at a cost of $31 per lesson (8 lessons per term). We will require a certain number of students in order to pursue this opportunity. Swimming sports: Years 4-6 - Thursday, 5th July Please see our article here for all details. Swimming lessons for Years 1-3 next term + SURVEY Please complete the attached survey so that your child can be grouped with students of similar ability for lessons next term: https://www.easyswim.co.nz/school-lessons-survey Please check details of swimming lessons for our Te Rito and Koru students in this article here. Invoices have been added to your account.  Netball - Year 1 and 2 Please see the attached document for information regarding a netball programme for year 1 and 2 aged students this winter. If you wish to register for this programme, please use the website listed in the attachment - registrations are not taken by the School, however payment of the $40 fee is made direct to school. FOUND: please see our attached photo for items recently found. These can be collected from Reception.  Another message from Koru Hub! We are spending the next three weeks making and creating! Can you please send to school the following "cleaned" items so that we have plenty of things to create with: fizzy bottles, milk bottles, small boxes ie mini cereal boxes, muesli bar boxes, tubes (but not toilet rolls), egg cartons, tin cans (smooth edged only) polystyrene or packaging etc. Basically anything you might normally put out with your recycling. Thanks! By Rachael van RijAttachments Detailed information about Year 1 and 2 2018   PDF, 49.5 KBPhoto Gallery

    • Craft for modern living: New craft books in your library
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • In this mass manufacturing world we live in today, handmade items are unique. They represent the passion, energy, knowledge and determination of the artist and usually, they have a story to tell as the art of craft is as old as our species! Enjoy the new books we have chosen for you. Craeft : how traditional crafts are about more than just making / Alexander Langlands. “In a period of meaningless mass manufacturing, our growing appetite for hand-made objects, artisan food, and craft beverages reveals our deep cravings for tradition and quality. But there was a time when craft meant something very different; the Old English word craeft possessed an almost indefinable sense of knowledge, wisdom, and power. In this fascinating book, historian and popular broadcaster Alex Langlands goes in search of the mysterious lost meaning of craeft. Through a vibrant series of mini-histories, told with his trademark energy and charm, Langlands resurrects the ancient craftspeople who fused exquisite skill with back-breaking labour – and passionately defends the renewed importance of craeft today.” (Syndetics summary) Making books : a guide for creating hand-crafted books / by the London Centre for Book Arts ; Simon Goode and Ira Yonemura. “This is a modern, stylish and practical guide to the traditional craft of bookbinding, written by the founders of the London Centre for Book Arts, a destination workshop space that attracts visitors from all over the world. Accessible enough for complete beginners, while full of inspiration for those with more experience, this is the ultimate guide to making beautiful books by hand. Starting with an introduction to the bindery and a useful inventory of necessary tools and equipment, you’ll also learn about different paper types, and special finishes such as cloth coverings, headbands and ribbon markers.” (Syndetics summary) Leatherworks : traditional craft for modern living / by Otis Ingrams ; photography by Simon Brown. “Learn to make stylish and beautiful items from leather, from homeware to fashion accessories, in your own living room. From a woven bench or log basket, to bags, a sunglasses case or even an apron, this cool craft book teaches you how to make 20 simple yet stylish leather projects. This book is the perfect introduction to working with leather.” (Syndetics summary) Techniques using slips / John Mathieson. “A form of liquid clay, has been used since ancient times to add color and texture to ceramics. This method of clay decoration, practiced from Rome to Mesoamerica, continues to develop internationally. Slips allow ceramicists to give their works rich, intriguing surfaces in a range of hues. In Techniques Using Slips, expert potter John Mathieson explains how to formulate and apply slips successfully to embellish earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain. Techniques Using Slips is a must for any potter’s library. Ceramic artists and educators will turn to this handbook again and again for direction and insight.” (Syndetics summary) Mastering hand building : techniques, tips, and tricks for slabs, coils, and more / Sunshine Cobb ; foreword by Andrea Gill. “From pinch pots to coiled boxes to soft slab tableware, mastering hand building is a lifelong pursuit. In this book, Sunshine Cobb covers all the foundational skills, with lessons for constructing both simple and complex forms from clay. Ceramic artists will also find a variety of next-level techniques and tips: designing templates and replicating pieces, lidded vessels, using molds, a variety of decorative techniques, and other avenues of exploration are all inside.” (Syndetics summary) Making candles : create 20 decorative candles to keep or to give / Sarah Ditchfield. “Candles are a much-loved feature in the home, and make thoughtful, handcrafted gifts for friends and family. Sarah Ditchfield shows you how to make beautiful, unique candles for all occasions, using traditional and modern materials and techniques.” (Syndetics summary)

    • A Story for Matariki 2018
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • Te Whiti o Tu   [A Story for You] Longing for landfall, the albatross Sought the twin sisters of the wavesMist of the Breaking SurfAnd Voice of the Breaking Surf. So the young warrior RautoroaCourted Rehutai and TangimoanaBringing gifts to their chieftain fatherHoping to take away a bride But both twin girls fell in loveWith the bold and handsome youthSo that neither would leave himAlone with the other. Seeking to choose between themThe young man asked for waterAnd Tangimoana hurried to the streamTo fill a gourd so that he could drink. But Rehutai lingered, at last aloneWith the man she fallen in love with,Until he said again in anger:Woman fetch me water. But Tangimoana on filling her gourdMuddied the stream so thatWhen her sister came to its edgeShe had to wait for it to clear. And on returning Rehutai foundHer sister wearing the warrior’s cloakWith his raukura feather in her headbandSignifying that they were betrothed. At this the bereft girl rose with the mistLiving thenceforth a desolate lifeOn the hill of the lonely oneOhine-mokemoke Rehutai. Rehutai’s Lament I toss like the wavesMoaning with lossTurning restlesslyAlone on my sleeping mat. A young girl dreamingThat his love would be mine -But only starlight lingersNow night has overtaken day. The dark stains of peatFrom the marshlandAre washed by the streamBut heart stains are forever [Dedicated to my lovely friend and City Fitness personal trainer Bernadette 'BJ' Baker] BUY: The marvellous artwork at: www.bwaipuka.co.nz/ Bronwyn Waipuka-Callander: B.WAIPUKAart | Contemporary Maori Artist SEE: http://www.bwaipuka.co.nz/buyprint27.html http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-CowYest-t1-body-d1-d8-d3.html

    • School gates: solution
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • “School gates chaos in Wellington forces council to develop plan to get kids out of cars” says the Dom Post today (sorry – says te Upoko o te Ika today). Well, you know what the answers to that are, don’t you? We’ve been through this a hundred times before. Step One, implement BBREO, the solution developed by Richard Reid Associates. Just do it! He had it all worked out – as part of the solution for the Basin Reserve that didn’t involve a 250m long flyover around the Basin, but instead offered a sensitive and careful reworking of the space near the schools. And then of course there is the brilliant scheme developed by the Architectural Centre – the famous Option X. That involved the particular section of road in front of the Government House entry being closed off entirely, and the cars being routed round just the north side of the Basin, and linked up to the Arras Tunnel. So much simpler and better than NZTA’s faulty and rejected Bridge solution. It sounds as though Let’s Get Wellington Moving is almost at the point of admitting that Arch Centre had it right all along, with the announcement the other day that “Sussex St could go over the top of SH1 on a bridge” – which is as much as saying “Go Option X” after all this time. But back to the school gates. If the SH1 does not go near the School Gates, and there is no way to stop, then the children can walk round the Basin to the local road network instead – and catch a bus, or actually walk, like school children are meant to do. Problem solved. Get those bloody helicopter parents out of here!

    • #MatarikiMash challenge #4: Wednesday 20th June
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Nau mai, welcome back to week two of this years #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are: whaea (mother) maunga (mountain) inanahi (yesterday) hangi (traditional earth oven feast) Head over to Twitter to join in! (@wcl_library) Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday. We’ll post up four te reo Māori kupu each morning, and all you need to do is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story or poem, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag. We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in. Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

    • Sunday 24 // Gathering & Shared Meal 4PM
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Capital Mosaic, Wellington
      • Thinking about connecting with our community? Our gatherings are a great first point of connection with our community if you are curious about who we are and what we do. Join us on Sunday as we celebrate God together then finish our time around the table with a shared meal. Everyone welcome!

    • Swimming suffragettes: New biographies
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • “A revolution in swimming was underway. By custom and often by law, women in America and England weren’t allowed in the water without covering their limbs in a heavy “bathing costume” that weighed them down. But some women wanted to jump into the water unencumbered, and even to race…” — Sarah Laskow Swimming features prominently in this month’s new biographies, including Jenny Landreth’s Swell, which details the connection between women’s suffrage and swimming, as well as Yusra Mardini’s Butterfly: from Refugee to Olympian, describing Mardini’s escape from Syria and later membership of the Refugee Olympic Athletes Team. And if you’ve forgotten your togs or towel, don’t worry–we’ve got plenty of biographies set on dry land as well! Swell : a waterbiography / Jenny Landreth. “These days, swimming may seem like the most egalitarian of pastimes, open to anyone with a swimsuit–but this wasn’t always the case. It wasn’t until the 1930s that women were finally, and reluctantly, granted equal access to the water. This is the story of the women who made that possible, a thank-you to the fearless “swimming suffragettes” who fought for equal access, and won.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) Butterfly : from refugee to Olympian–my story of rescue, hope, and triumph / Yusra Mardini with Josie Le Blond. “When young Syrian refugee Yusra Mardini realized her boat’s engine shut down as she was travelling from Syria to Greece with other refugees, there was no hesitation: she dove into the water. Grabbing a rope with one hand, she began kicking up the black water, inching the boat towards the distant shore. This act of bravery saved the lives of a boatload of refugees–and started her towards the Rio Olympics.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) Excuse me while I slip into someone more comfortable : a memoir / Eric Poole. “In 1977, Eric Poole is a talented high school trumpet player with one working ear, the height-to-weight ratio of a hat rack, a series of annoyingly handsome bullies and a mother irrationally devoted to Lemon Pledge. But who he wants to be is a star…ANY star. Picking up at the end of his first acclaimed memoir, Where’s My Wand?, Poole’s journey from self-delusion to acceptance is simultaneously hysterical, heartfelt and inspiring.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) The girl : Marilyn Monroe, the seven year itch, and the birth of an unlikely feminist / Michelle Morgan. “With an in-depth look at the two most empowering years in the life of Marilyn Monroe, The Girl details how The Seven Year Itch created an icon and sent the star on an adventure of self-discovery and transformation from a controlled wife and contract player into a businesswoman and unlikely feminist whose power is still felt today.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) Staying : a memoir / Jessie Cole. “As children, Jessie Cole and her brother Jake ran wild, free to roam their rainforest home as they pleased. They had each other, parents who adored them, and two mysterious, beautiful, clever half-sisters. But when Jessie was on the cusp of adolescence, tragedy struck, and her family fell apart. This heartbreaking memoir asks what happens to those who are left behind when someone takes their own life–and finding peace in a place of pain.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) Odyssey of the unknown Anzac / David Hastings. “Ten years after the end of World War I, the Sydney Sun reported that an unknown Anzac still lay in a Sydney psychiatric hospital. Thousands of people in Australia and New Zealand responded to this story and began an international campaign to find the man’s family. David Hastings follows this one previously unknown Anzac, George McQuay, from rural New Zealand through Gallipoli and finally home. By doing so, he takes us deep inside the Great War and the human mind.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) MI5 and me : a coronet among the spooks / Charlotte Bingham. “When Lottie is summoned to her father’s office at the age of 18, she is astonished to learn that this unexciting parent is a spy. Even more perturbing is his view that she should stop drifting around and get a proper job, something patriotic and worthwhile. This unique memoir is a window into 1950s Britain: a country where Russian agents infiltrate the highest echelons, where debutantes are typists and where Englishness is both a nationality and a code of behaviour.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.) Skybound : a journey in flight / Rebecca Loncraine. “In her mid-30s Rebecca Loncraine was diagnosed with breast cancer. Two years later, and after months of gruelling treatment, she flew in a glider for the first time. In that engineless plane, soaring 3000 feet over the landscape of her childhood with only the rising thermals to take her higher and the birds to lead the way, she fell in love.” (Adapted from the Syndetics summary.)

    • Matariki events for tamariki and their whānau
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Tēnā koutou kātoa! Join us in celebrating Matariki at Wellington City Libraries this winter! It’s a time of celebration and reflection, of whānau and of kōrerorero — and a time to cook and eat delicious kai! Whether you want to celebrate with others or just learn more about this wonderful festival, your library has you covered with books, resources and events for the whole family. Many of our usual preschool storytime and Kōhunga Kōrero sessions this month will be Matariki-themed, but we’re also running special Matariki events with stories, songs and crafts for tamariki and their families at selected libraries: Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Monday 18th June, 6:30pm Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: Wednesday 20th June, 4:00pm Island Bay Community Centre: Thursday 21st June, 10:30am Karori Library: Thursday 21st June, 6:30pm Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Thursday 28th June, 3:30pm Khandallah Library: Thursday 28th June, 6:30pm Johnsonville Library: Friday 29th June, 3:30pm These events are free, suitable for preschool and school-aged children and their families, and bookings are not required.

    • Bush-bashing and bogs: Botanical hunting in the North Island
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Te Papa's blog
      • In December 2017, Te Papa Botanist Heidi Meudt was on the hunt for some uncommon forget-me-nots in two very special places in the central North Island. A particular highlight of this field work was the collaboration with local landowners, iwi, the Department of Conservation (DOC), and other botanists.  Using previous collectionsRead more

    • Heading to the Ice Hockey? We've got extra services for you - Saturday 23 June
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Be a part of history as Westpac stadium hosts the first outdoor ice hockey game (at a major stadium) in the Southern Hemisphere.USA take on Canada in this clash with a curtain raiser of our own Ice Blacks against an All Stars team.We will have extra services on the Kapiti, Hutt Valley and Johnsonville lines to get you home after the main game finishes and there will be additional seating on services leading up to the historic event.Gates open: 12:30pmCurtain raiser Ice Blacks vs. All Stars - 1:00pmMain game USA vs Canada - 4:00pm This affects these services: HVL JVL KPL

    • New books about movies
      • 19 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • New books on movies feature a variety of fascinating books including All the things I lost in the flood; the comprehensive collection of Laurie Anderson’s works, and the unique movie guide by Gordy LaSure (a.k.a Richard Ayoade). Check them out! All the things I lost in the flood : essays on pictures, language, and code / Laurie Anderson. “Laurie Anderson is one of the most revered artists working today, and she is as prolific as she is inventive. She is a musician, performance artist, composer, fiction writer, and filmmaker. A few years ago, Anderson began poring through her extensive archive of nearly forty years of work and she brings together the most comprehensive collection of her artwork to date.” (Syndetics summary) Ink & paint : the women of Walt Disney’s animation / by Mindy Johnson. “In this glossy volume, featuring never-before-seen photos, artwork, and detailed accounts, the process, techniques, and contributions of the women – and men – who defined the Walt Disney Studio’s legendary Ink & Paint Department over the years are carefully explored, preserved, and shared for future generations.” (Syndetics summary) Jim Henson’s the Dark crystal : the ultimate visual history / Caseen Gaines ; foreword by Cheryl Henson ; introduction by Brian and Wendy Froud. “Dark Crystal: The Ultimate Visual History is the definitive collection of rare artwork, interviews, and on-set photos from the beloved Jim Henson fantasy classic. This deluxe coffee-table book contains an in-depth look at the day-to-day production of the film and showcases a huge range of incredible visuals, including candid set photography, previously unseen concept art, storyboards, production notes, and more.” (Syndetics summary) The grip of film / by Gordy LaSure (a.k.a. Richard Ayoade) “Gordy LaSure’s passionate about film. He eats film, he drinks film, and sometimes he’ll even watch a film. But most of all he loves talking to people about film: whether a comely student with low confidence and a father complex, a Studio ‘development’ exec who doesn’t trust his own judgement, or the countless people Gordy LaSure’s encountered in his capacity as the web moderator on an Excessive Sweating Discussion Forum. Gordy LaSure’s always talking about films and how they’d be a shit ton better if only people would pull their asses out of their ears and listen to Gordy LaSure.” (Syndetics summary) From the third eye : the Evergreen review film reader / edited by Ed Halter and Barney Rosset ; additional research by Matt Peterson. “For the first time ever, Evergreen Review’s important contributions to film culture are available in one volume. The book presents writing on the films of Jean-Luc Godard, Pier Paolo Passolini, Ousmane Sembene, Andy Warhol and others. Offering incisive essays and interviews from the late 1950’s to early 1970’s, From The Third Eye explores politics and revolution in cinema, underground and experimental film, pornography and censorship and the rise of independent films against the dominance of Hollywood.” (Syndetics summary) Sense of occasion / Harold Prince. “Sense of Occasion gives an insider’s recollection of the making of such landmark musicals as West Side Story , Fiddler on the Roof , Cabaret , Company , Follies , Sweeney Todd , Evita , and Phantom of the Opera , with Prince’s perceptive comments about his mentor George Abbott and his many celebrated collaborators, including Leonard Bernstein, Jerome Robbins, Stephen Sondheim, John Kander, Boris Aronson, and Andrew Lloyd Webber. Throughout, he offers insights into the way business is conducted on Broadway, drawing sharp contrasts between past and present.” (Syndetics summary)

    • New Classical CD arrivals
      • 18 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • In this week’s classical CD additions we highlight some new orchestral recordings from much-loved composers. Symphony No. 7, Bruckner. Performed by the Gewandhausorchester, with Andris Nelsons. “The continuation of Andris Nelsons’s much-admired Bruckner cycle with the Gewandhausorchester. Here they play the Seventh Symphony – premiered in 1884 by this orchestra and now recorded live to mark its 275th anniversary and Nelsons’s inauguration as Kapellmeister. ‘Under Nelsons the Leipzig Gewandhausorchester is clearly at the very top of its form, savouring its great Bruckner tradition to sonorous effect’ (BR Klassik…)” (cover). Le Quattro Stagioni, Vivaldi. Performed by Rachel Podger and Brecon Baroque. “Together with the star players of Brecon Baroque, Podger guides listeners through the cycle of nature and life. Vivaldi’s Four Seasons have become one of classical music’s best loved works. However, most recordings adopt a strikingly similar approach to these scores, and familiarity has blunted the music’s edge. Podger’s new recording aims to reset the clock – refocusing on the ingredients that make The Four Seasons so special and reminding listeners of the remarkable freshness of Vivaldi’s invention.” (amazon.com). Symphony No. 6, Mahler. Performed by Minnesota Orchestra, with Osmo Vänskä. “…Osmo Vänskä has a reputation for engaging with even the most iconic scores at face value, avoiding preconceived ideas and ‘time-honored’ traditions. His and the Minnesota Orchestra’s recording of Mahler’s Sixth follows upon the 2017 release of the composer’s Fifth Symphony. Nominated to a 2018 Grammy Award, that interpretation has been described as at once committed and detached, intense and transcendentally timeless (Norman Lebrecht) and an exceptional performance that promises great things to come (allmusic.com).” (amazon.com).

    • Flavours of the world: New cooking books
      • 18 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Take a culinary journey and taste the flavours of the world! This collection of cook books invites you to cook dishes from France, Turkey, Melbourne, the Middle East and more. My mother’s kitchen : New Zealand’s best chefs, bakers and foodies share their mothers’ special recipes. “In this book an extremely impressive line-up of over 70 New Zealand chefs, cooks, bakers, writers and foodies share the stories and recipes from their own mother’s kitchen, the food that they remember and which triggers all the best memories of early family life. The contributors include international chef Peter Gordon; Ben Bayly of The Grove; Peta Mathias; Bevan Smith from Riverstone Kitchen; Karena and Kasey Bird and many more. This is a very special New Zealand cookbook to enjoy and share.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) Istanbul & Beyond : exploring the diverse cuisines of Turkey / Robyn Eckhardt ; photographs by David Hagerman. “Standing at the crossroads between the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia, Turkey boasts astonishingly rich and diverse culinary traditions. Journalist Robyn Eckhardt and her husband, photographer David Hagerman, have spent almost twenty years discovering the country’s very best dishes. Now they take readers on an unforgettable epicurean adventure, beginning in Istanbul, home to one of the world’s great fusion cuisines.” (Provided by publisher) Our Syria : recipes from home / Itab Azzam and Dina Mousawi ; photography by Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton. “Syria is where food, memory, and resilience collide: recreate the flavors of this beautiful country in Our Syria, for delicious meals anywhere in the world. Friends and passionate cooks Itab and Dina met Syrian women in the Middle East and Europe to collect together the very best recipes from one of the world’s greatest food cultures. They spent months cooking with them, learning their recipes and listening to stories of home. Our Syria is a delicious celebration of the unique taste, culture, and food of Syria-and a celebration of everything that food and memory can mean to an individual, to a family, and to a nation.” (Syndetics summary) Joel Serra’s Modern Spanish Kitchen / by Joel Serra Bevin. “‘Food is not what you cook, but what you make others taste.’ Joel Serra Bevin was born in New Zealand and grew up in Tasmania. Inspired by his Catalan great-grandfather, Papa Serra, Joel moved to Barcelona where he has immersed himself in his much-loved Spanish food and cooking. These eighty recipes offer both a beginner’s guide to eating and drinking like a local in Barcelona and Spain, with fresh takes on Spanish favorites such as Fideua with Squid Ink, Allioli, Pulpo Gallego and Leche Merengada, as well as plenty of inspiration for those looking to experiment.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) The Palestinian Table / Reem Kassis. “150 delicious, easy-to-follow recipes inspired by three generations of family tradition. While interest in Middle Eastern cuisines has blossomed, the nuances and subtleties of Palestinian food are still relatively unexplored. In The Palestinian Table, Reem Kassis weaves a tapestry of personal anecdotes, local traditions, and historical context, sharing with home cooks her collection of nearly 150 delicious, easy-to-follow recipes that range from simple breakfasts and quick-to-prepare salads to celebratory dishes fit for a feast–giving rare insight into the heart of the Palestinian family kitchen.” (Provided by publisher) The Adriatic Kitchen : recipes inspired by the abundance of seasonal ingredients flourishing on the Croatian island of Korčula / Barbara Unković. “Barbara Unkovic has always been drawn to the land of her father, the sun-soaked Croatian island of Korcula in the Adriatic Sea. She spent several years living there, in the seaside village of Racisce. Now, inspired by the island’s culinary traditions and its abundance of fresh, seasonal ingredients, Barbara has produced The Adriatic Kitchen , a delightful, rustic cookbook full of gorgeous recipes and evocative memories.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary) I Heart Rome : recipes & stories from the Eternal City / Maria Pasquale ; photography by Andrea Federici and Giorgia Nofrini. “Rome is an open-air museum; it’s a modern-day marvel of a city that has seen centuries of emperors, popes, movements, triumphs, and tragedies. Through quirky local stories and glorious pictures, I Heart Rome takes you on an inspiring journey through the Rome that tourists rarely get to see. From carbonara recipes to artichoke-frying techniques, just about everything food-related is up for–and causes much–debate in Rome. You too will heart Rome after delving into this book.” (Syndetics summary) Flavours of Melbourne : over 90 restaurants, bars & hotels with their signature recipes. “Flavours of Melbourne uncovers favourite restaurants and bars in the rooftops and laneways of the city. Inside, you’ll find beautiful photography showcasing each restaurant and bar plus signature recipes from head chefs using the fantastic produce that surrounds Melbourne. Discover the hottest restaurants, cafes and bars in the cosmopolitan capital of the country with Flavours of Melbourne. With fantastic photography, signature recipes and insightful editorial, it’s an insider’s look into the very best Melbourne has to offer.” (Syndetics summary) Hong Kong food city / Tony Tan. “To eat in Hong Kong is endlessly fascinating and exciting. A mere dot on the map of China, and home to seven million migrants, Hong Kong boasts a food scene that is breathtakingly rich and varied. Tony Tan explores this vibrant city through 80 exquisite dishes, from the cutting-edge contemporary to the traditional, from both the high and low of Hong Kong cuisine – with recipes from the city’s iconic hotels, its hawker stalls, and even a legendary dumpling house on the outskirts of Kowloon. Tony weaves his recipes with stories that trace Hong Kong’s Chinese roots, explore its deep colonial connections and tantalise us with glimpses of today’s ultra-modern city and most delicious eating spots.” (Syndetics summary) Tuscany : simple meals & fabulous feasts from Italy / Katie & Giancarlo Caldesi ; photography by Helen Cathcart. “At the heart of every Tuscan there is a pride for their region and an incredible sense of responsibility and love for their surroundings. In Tuscany, Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi take readers on a culinary journey through a Tuscan day. The pace of both life and cooking in Tuscany is slow and calm. Breakfasts are considered, lunch often eaten at home with family, and weekend dinners a feast. In Tuscany, there is a dolci (dessert) for every month of the year, and Katie and Giancarlo do not disappoint. Tuscany takes you on a culinary journey across this diverse landscape, exploring the traditions and cooking techniques that make this food so extraordinary.” (Sydetics summary)

    • What Does God Think About China Being In The South Pacific?
      • 18 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • FRAGRANT PLUMS AND DIVINE INTERVENTION China’s thrust into the Pacific islands region, a collection of more than a dozen tiny nations including Fiji, Niue, Timor Leste [and New Zealand?] scattered across thousands of miles of ocean, has the U.S. and its close ally Australia worried.  The region played a key role in World War II and remains strategically important as Western powers seek to maintain open sea lines and stability. For Beijing, it offers raw materials, from gas to timber, and a clutch of countries who could voice support for its territorial claims. ... Hugh White, a professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University in Canberra, says “there’s no doubt” China could seek to establish a military presence in the Pacific in the future, cashing in its influence with “one of these small, vulnerable states.” “It intends to become the primary power in east Asia and the western Pacific,” White said. Governments in the region have sought to strike a balance between accepting China’s cash and resisting moves that would raise concern among Western military powers. Vanuatu in April denied media reports that China had approached it to build a permanent military base in one of its harbors. Beijing’s push into the Pacific islands risks further straining ties with key trading partner Australia — which views the region as its own diplomatic backyard and has been increasingly critical of China’s economic and military muscle-flexing.  ... Papua New Guinea has traditionally looked to Australia — from which it won independence in 1975 — for a helping hand. Outside of the capital, the nation’s woeful roads network has helped push prices of food staples beyond what many can afford. It’s also struggling with an illiteracy rate of 35 percent, poor tax collection and endemic corruption. Australia is still its largest donor, contributing more than three-quarters of total aid and loans compared to China’s 14 percent. Yet the majority is directed to improving corporate governance, while Beijing has focused on infrastructure and major works - but China is growing in influence year by year. ... China’s foreign ministry, which didn’t respond to a request for comment, in April said Pacific island nations weren’t in the “sphere of influence of any country” and called on Australia not to interfere. “It’s scaremongering to think this will lead to any military design or ambition in the Pacific,” Wang said in a phone interview from Beijing. “We will see China increase its presence there and it will keep helping these countries build their infrastructure.” China is in the region to stay, said Jonathan Pryke of the Lowy Institute, a Sydney-based think tank. “China has entered the Pacific in a significant way,” said Pryke. “It’s upended the status quo and caused anxiety, because no-one knows what its end-game is." SEE: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-06-17/china-s-pacific-islands-push-has-the-u-s-worried Case Study: Kingdom of Tonga [by Cleo Paskal for the Canada Asia Pacific Foundation] To illustrate her argument, Paskal discussed the Kingdom of Tonga, a small island nation in the Pacific. Few Western states have a significant diplomatic presence in the country, and the West generally relies on Australia and New Zealand to “manage” geopolitical affairs in Tonga and the wider region. However, Australia and New Zealand’s behaviour towards the Tongans (including tied aid and concerns over spying) have alienated Tongan officials and sent them looking for new allies. Enter China—looking for friendship. Beijing has been on a charm offensive towards Tonga, providing business, immigration, and lots of soft power—including giving every Tongan M.P. a laptop. Despite some local discontent towards Chinese immigrants and shops, the Tongan government is forging closer ties with their new partners in Beijing. The relationship between China and Tonga is mutually beneficial—China doesn’t harangue Tonga about human rights while giving it aid, and China gets a strategic ally. Paskal argues that China is applying this strategy across the whole region. For example, in 2015 Beijing indicated it would help Fiji build a navy base. The goal, of course, is to move the nations of Oceania out of the Western sphere of influence and make them allies of Beijing. Beyond closer economic and political ties within the island chains, China also gains influence at the U.N., as the islands account for 14 votes in the General Assembly. SEE: https://www.asiapacific.ca/blog/making-case-canadas-engagement-oceania SEE ALSO [for example]: https://www.reddit.com/r/geopolitics/comments/58wmqr/one_way_to_understand_chinese_expansionism_in_the/ https://kjohnsonnz.blogspot.com/2012/06/kiwis-first-to-face-drachmageddon.html?q=PACIFIC+GEOPLITICS Clearly New Zealand is not going to go to war against China but it does need to start to recognize realities. Deploying the small forces that we have to Sudan may not be our best option. And if the Chinese want to use us - Make Them Pay. https://kjohnsonnz.blogspot.com/2018/02/nz-defence-policy-dangerous-reliance-on.html SLIDE SHOW THE EPIC TUSSLE FOR EURASIA BETWEEN 'HEARTLAND' LAND POWERS AND 'RIMLAND' MARITIME POWERS IS UNAVOIDABLE [Mackinder 19th Century] WORLD WAR TWO WAS A MASSIVE MARITIME VICTORY CHINA HAS BEEN 'CONTAINED' BY THE USA BUT IS 'BREAKING OUT' NEW ZEALAND [AS IT WAS IN WW2] IS AN IMPORTANT RIMLAND FALLBACKMASSIVE CHINESE MERCANTILIST / GEOPOLITICAL INTERVENTION IN THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC IS INEVITABLE CHINA IS ALREADY ALMOST AS IMPORTANT TO THE PACIFIC NATIONS AS THE USA AND IS STARTING TO RIVAL AUSTRALIA

    • East by West Ferries commuter survey out now.
      • 18 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Please follow the below link to be taken to East by West Ferries commuter survey.Copies of this survey can also be found on board.https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZWTCHPKWe appreciate you taking the time to fill this out, your responses help us improve our services.Fill this out by Friday 6th July and you can also win a free 10-trip (details included on survey)  This affects these services: WHF

    • Buses replace some train services on the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and Masterton - Saturday 23 and Sunday 24 June
      • 18 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Buses will be replacing some trains on the Wairarapa line between Upper Hutt and Masterton.Buses will be replacing some trains on the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and Masterton on Saturday 23 and Sunday 24 June. You can visit the Rail Maintenance Projects page for more information. Bus replacement timetable - services highlighted in green will be replaced by buses:Wairarapa Line Bus replacement posterYou may not be able to use this service as you normally would. If you have additional mobility needs please contact 0800 801 700 to plan your travel.For bus pick-up locations check 'Where do I catch the bus?'Please allow extra time for travel when bus replacement is offered. Bus replacements are not tracked via real time information when they replace trains.Cycles other than folding cycles, will not be carried on the buses replacing trains. For more information see: https://www.metlink.org.nz/getting-around/using-a-cycle-on-pt/All folded prams can be carried on board the bus replacement services when stored in the luggage areas, non-foldable prams may not be able to be carried on all bus replacements, please talk to on-board staff when boarding.If you have additional mobility needs please talk to the on board staff or contact Metlink to plan your trip.For more information call Metlink on 0800 801 700 or use the Journey Planner. This affects these services: WRL

    • Farewell to the library bees
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • It is with heavy hearts that we advise that the Central rooftop is no longer home to our bees and their hives. Council reluctantly had to make this decision due to the forthcoming extensive building works in Te Ngākau Civic Square which will probably extend across years rather than a few months due to earthquake strengthening. This move will be for the foreseeable future, at least until the environment is more settled. We have loved having the bees and working with Cenna Lloyd (professional beekeeper from Local Flavour Urban Honey company) who has been visiting and caring for the bees while they were part of our team! If you are thinking of exploring adding bees to your property, here are some titles to browse: Practical beekeeping in New Zealand, by Andrew Matheson. This is a classic title which has just been updated in its 5th edition. This is the main local guide to keeping bees in New Zealand, and is suitable for both amateur and professional beekeepers but also the interested general reader with information about many beekeeping subjects, not only hive management. The rooftop beekeeper : a scrappy guide to keeping urban honeybees, Megan Paska, “This explores the ease and charm of keeping bees in an urban environment. Its approach is a practical manual – but is well illustrated, with checklists and plenty of tips and good advice. Covering all aspects of urban beekeeping, this book also includes plenty of sweet recipes for delicious treats, tonics, and beauty products to make with your honey. Keeping bees in towns & cities, by Luke Dixon. “Keeping Bees in Towns and Cities features everything an urbanite needs to know to start keeping bees: how to select the perfect hive, how to buy bees, how to care for a colony, how to harvest honey, and what to do in the winter. Urban beekeeping has particular challenges and needs, and this book highlights the challenges and presents practices that are safe, legal, and neighbour-friendly. The text is rounded out with profiles of urban beekeepers from all over the world.” (Catalogue) Save the bees with natural backyard hives : the easy and treatment-free way to attract and keep healthy bees, by Rob McFarland “Save the Bees offers different, easy and healthier ways to keep your own hive. Their approach is fresh, modern and easy for anyone to do. Learn step-by-step how to acquire a colony, care for it and reap the reward – that incredibly delicious, all-natural, chemical-free, unprocessed, honey.

    • The story behind the Ko Rongowhakaata typeface
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Te Papa's blog
      • The typeface used in the exhibition Ko Rongowhakaata: The Story of Light and Shadow was developed in 2017. But its origins date back to the early 1800s, and is intimately connected to the iwi. Here is its story, told by Te Papa graphic designer Wol Jobson and Rongowhakaata’s Karl Johnstone. Two ofRead more

    • #MatarikiMash challenge #3: Monday 18th June
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Wellington City Libraries News Blog
      • Nau mai, welcome to week two of our literary tweet #MatarikiMash challenge for 2018! Your words for today are: hui (gathering, meeting) āpōpō (tomorrow) hīkoi (walk) kiwi (native bird) Head over to Twitter to join in! (@wcl_library) Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday. We’ll post up four te reo Māori kupu each morning, and all you need to do is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story or poem, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag. We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in. Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

    • Val Muirhead (nee Phillips) 23/01/1933-8/04/2017
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • Val Muirhead died at Waikanae at the age of 84. She was a former Epuni Club/Empire Club member and Hutt Valley Table Tennis Representative. Val was a Empire Club/Hutt Valley Association Committee Member and a Hutt Valley Life Member. Val... Continue Reading →

    • Travel Report – 2018 Marlborough Open
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • Malcolm Wong was the only Wellington player at the Marlborough Open which was held at the Simcox Stadium (Blenheim). There were 37 males (15 juniors) and 8 females (3 juniors) entered. On the Saturday (12 May) Malcolm was runner up... Continue Reading →

    • 2018 NZ Chinese Easter Sports Tournament – Table Tennis
      • 17 Jun 2018
      • Table Tennis Wellington
      • This was the 71st NZ Chinese Sports Tournament which is held in Wellington (30 March – 2 April). The table tennis was held at the ASB Sports Centre in Kilbirnie on Friday afternoon (30 March) from 1pm to 5pm. There... Continue Reading →

    • Updated timetables for Routes 110 and 145
      • 16 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • We have updated the timetables for Routes 110 and 145 on the Metlink website. Please check the timetables on the website or in the files attached before you head to your bus stop tomorrow.Download Route 110 timetable Download Route 145 timetable This affects these services: 110 145

    • Some Route 91 Airport Flyer Buses Are Cancelled Today
      • 16 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • The following Route 91's are cancelled today due to a driver shortage: Departing Lower Hutt - Queensgate10.40am12.40pm4.00pm6.25pmDeparting Wellington Airport11.40am1.40pm5.10pm7.25pmWe sincerely apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and recommend referring to the route 91 timetable for alternative departure times.   This affects these services: 91

    • Koalas: 'Perplexed and up a gum tree, You can often just their bum see'.
      • 16 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • My poem of 26 March 2013 on the Koala has been very popular - it comes out tops on my Poemhunter stats. I surmise that it has a dedicated following among Australian schoolteachers. So on reading this morning that Koalas are being given fecal transplants to help them digest the less palatable leaves of the Messmate eucalypt gum, I thought it time to reprise. BUNYIP'S BLUES Whiskery chin and whiskery chops Snoozing in the broad tree tops Dreamy eyes and whiskery ears They sleep away the furry years. A nose that’s hard to see around And legs that bandy on the ground. Perplexed and up a gum tree, You can often just their bum see. Now Uncle Wattleberry’s a fine example Whose sideburns sprouted more than ample. So much his house among the trees Even whiskered in the breeze. His nephew Bunyip though was not impressed And thought his uncle over-dressed - And with their space by hairiness pervaded Young Bluegum shaved and fur-pomaded. He took to dining on the trunk below But listless gummed his soup with woe As lizards borrowed or much worse stole His cough-drop pottage from the bowl. Said Bunyip: “Whiskers alone are bad enough Attached to faces coarse and rough But how much greater their offence is When stuck on Uncles’ countenances.” His uncle thus replied: “Shaving may add an air that’s somewhat brisker For dignity, commend me to the whisker As noble thoughts the inward being grace So noble whiskers dignify the face.” Now this lingo sparked a blue and Bunyip lost his rag So much, he did a bunk and upped and humped his swag. And if you want to know the outcome of his walkabout intentions Consult ‘The Magic Pudding’ [Albert], on his stew and jam indentions. [Quotations and illustration from 'The Magic Pudding - the Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum' by Norman Lindsay (1918)] https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/16/koala-faecal-transplant-could-save-species

    • Mack twice
      • 16 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • I just about wept when I heard about the first fire at the Mackintosh School of Art in 2014. I’m not at all amused that they have just suffered a second fire, only months before the building was due to be handed over, post-restoration. To lose your building once is a tragedy, to lose it twice is just careless. And when you have a building as iconic, as “one-off” as the Mack, that’s just doubling down on the tragedy. The first fire was caused by spray from a foam model being made by a student – fire rapidly taking hold in the tinder-dry conditions of the old school. Fires are notoriously destructive when in old stone buildings with wooden floors between – the thermal envelope of the walls just act like a chimney, intensifying the fire. Last time, 90% of the building was saved, with the main victim being the centrepiece – the Library. This time, the damage is far, far worse – the heat so intense that it melted the roof of the building next door it seems – an O2 sponsored theatre building, that you can see in the police photo above, has collapsed inwards. Tragedy, as a word, doesn’t really go far enough. Last time the artistic community rallied around, with an auction of works by artists who had been through the Mack, using charcoal from the fire to draw, sketch, or create unique works. Total rebuild cost last time was estimated to be £35m, with the students moving back in by the end of this year. Now, however, it is totally fucked. That’s a blunt, crude word, but is a true Scottish word for the situation. Last time, the heat of the fire caused damage to a few of the stones, with the cooling blasts of water causing heat stress and cracking in the stone. “At the height of the fire, the building’s stonework endured temperatures of up to 1000C (1832F), and was then cooled down very quickly by the gallons of water used to douse the flames. This has left some of the stone shattered and fissured and and too weak for reuse.” Source: the Guardian This time, the amount burnt is so massive that much more damage to stones will have been caused. Steel windows have obviously burnt right out – steelwork on the exterior has probably gone as well. Last time, the iconic hanging lights in the Library were lost in the fire, but: “forensic archeologists rescued 620 individual pieces of brass plate lamp fittings from the ash and debris in the library. The fragments were then sorted into “light kits”, dependent on their location in relation to the 48 original light fittings that had been hanging on the day of the fire, and enough useable material has been saved to remake 29 complete lights.” Source: the Guardian Have those new lights been installed in the Library yet? If so, they’re gone again – but my guess is that they won’t have been fitted just yet. Also, last time, during restoration the Scots were horrified to learn that the iconic oak timber posts of the double-height volume in the Library were not, in fact, solid oak at all, but were in fact just an inch-thick oak veneer over a cheaper species, which reports at the time noted as “cheap New Zealand kauri pine”. Tall, straight-grained, immensely strong – yes, that’s our kauri alright! Cheap? Not so, any more. We can sell you some nice LVL pinus radiata though now, if you’d like that? There must come a time however, when you just throw your hands up and say “Enough now”. “The fire at the building, which was designed by artist and architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh and built between 1897 and 1909, has been called “devastating” by the city council leader Susan Aitken. Paul Sweeney, shadow Scotland minister, said the Mackintosh Building was the “most architecturally important building” in the city: “Oh dear, the 1909 library extension, that was the origin of the 2014 blaze is now fully alight too. It looks like the entire interior space is now fully alight. The best we can probably hope for is structural facade retention and a complete rebuild of the interior. Devastating. There must be a comprehensive national effort to ensure every possible option to salvage and restore what is one of the finest edifices in the history of world architecture is pursued in the wake of this latest setback.” Source: Glasgow Herald Is it time to call an end to the Mackintosh, and start again with a new building? This time, one with a functioning fire suppression system? Here in NZ, of course, we tear things down all the time, mostly because we pretend they are going to fall down in case of an earthquake, but mostly because we are cultural heathens with no sense of architectural history. So, £35m last time – and at least quadruple that this time. Glasgow – is it worth it? The people say…. ?

    • Pass of Branda closed due to slip – Route 30 affected
      • 15 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • The Pass of Branda in Seatoun remains closed due to a slip earlier today (Friday 15 June).Route 30 buses travelling to Breaker Bay will NOT service Seatoun. Karaka Bay-bound services are not affected.Customers wishing to travel to Seatoun will need to catch a Route 11 service Route 30 buses to Breaker Bay will travel via Kilbirnie and Moa Point, then turn around at the carpark at Breaker Bay Abseilers are working now and hope to clear the slip tonight for Monday morning. We will keep you up to date with any developments over the weekend that may affect journeys. This affects these services: 11 30

    • Great news! We're running a special WRL service to and from the All Blacks game tomorrow
      • 15 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Wairarapa SpecialAn additional Wairarapa service will be running to get you to and from the game.Before the event:Stopping at all stations between Masterton and Maymorn then express to Wellington.Masterton 2.20pm Carterton 2.35pm Featherston 2.56pm Maymorn 3.11pm Wellington 3.55pm After the event:The Wairarapa service will depart Wellington at 10pm to get you home. This affects these services: WRL

    • New temporary bus stop locations at Paraparaumu Station
      • 14 Jun 2018
      • Metlink - Greater Wellington's public transport network
      • Due to civil works we are temporarily closing and relocating Bus Stop B at Paraparaumu Station from 18 June to 14 July.This will affect Mana Coach, Uzabus and Metlink rail bus replacement services, which will now stop next to Bus Stop A at the northern end of the station building. We apologise for the inconvenience.Find out more on the Paraparaumu Station page.  This affects these services: KPL

    • Hospitality Industry Advocate Flat-Footed By Poet
      • 14 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • POET v ECONOMIST I was flummoxed this morning to read in the Dominion Post that it is some how ‘unfair’ to charge foreign tourists more than domestic visitors for access to Department of Conservation facilities [Opinion: ‘We shouldn’t be telling foreigners to take a hike’ by Peter Cough]. In which case, I guess it is unpardonable that Island Bay poet James Brown is charging locals $911.12 for his forthcoming Poetry Workshop at Victoria University while hitting overseas attendees with a swingeing $4,268.80. [I love the way Vic prices its fees to the nearest 10 cents]. But it may be that James knows a thing or two about willingness to pay and variously sloping demand curves. The fact is that differential charging in segmented markets is a well-established marketing concept - you can even do a special course in it at the University of Virginia:University of VirginiaCustomer Value in Pricing Strategy83 ratings Course 2 of 4 in the Specialization Pricing Strategy OptimizationThe traditional approach to pricing based on costs works to pay the bills, but it leaves revenue on the table. You can, in fact, price your products in a way that increases sales--if you know what your customers are willing to pay and can leverage psychology to create better deal and discount plans. In this course, we'll show you how to price a product based on how your customers value it and the psychology behind their purchase decisions. Led by Darden faculty and Boston Consulting Group global pricing experts, this course provides an in-depth understanding of value-based pricing and how to use it to capture more revenue. By the end of this course, you'll be able to... -- Apply knowledge of customer value to price products -- Leverage core value-based pricing techniques to inform pricing decisions -- Measure customer willingness to pay using models (surveys, conjoint analysis, other data) -- Use knowledge of consumer psychology to set prices beneficial to both consumers and sellers.

    • Te Kanohi o Te Ika
      • 14 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • It’s good to see the Dom Post rebranding itself today as Te Upoko o te Ika – ie the Head of the Fish !! Great move towards Te Reo Māori – but while they may indeed be a fish head, a fish is blind without its eyes. And we, my little fishy friends, are the Eye of the Fish. Just saying. The Eye of the Fish has been going for over 10 years now, looking out at the things architectural and matters urban, all the time with a focus on Wellington. Started by Philip and Maximus, now mostly Leviathan, the Eye of the Fish is still all-seeing, but is definitely commenting less. New writers always welcome. While there is a need, we’ll keep on looking. We’ve got our eyes out, so to speak.

    • Tihei Matariki! Welcome the Maori New Year!
      • 14 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • MAORI NEW YEAR - THE SEVEN SISTERS RISE ANEW Our birth-folk Sky and earth Together and apart Grief and yearning Heaving and strain. Their children The woodlands And the seas The winds and waves The food stores War and stillness. Though the young struggle With storms and snares, The dark and emptiness Are overcome by light and growth And the sky is clothed in stars. Get ready for the westerly Stand fast for the southerly It will be icy white inland And icy cold on the shore. May the dawn rise Red-tipped On snow, on frost The breath of life! POWHIRI At the island’s edgeThe warrior-wavesSwell and breakIn unison And the shore Picks up the challenge. Across the straitAre distant mountains,Arrayed like wise chiefsCapped with heron feathers,Snow-shone with white flame,Welcoming us to the winter solstice. [Repeated from 2017 - part traditional Maori invocation, part personal poetry].

    • Crabzilla! Our terrifying coconut crab is watching you
      • 14 Jun 2018
      • Te Papa's blog
      • A crab that can break coconuts, grows as big as a dog, steals anything that isn’t nailed down, and enjoys a tickle. Crab expert Rick Webber introduces us to the largest land-living arthropod in the world.Read more

    • Newsletter
      • 13 Jun 2018
      • Clyde Quay School
      • 13 June 2018 CQS Newsletter

    • NZ Labour's Transport Policy Confused and Deceitful?
      • 13 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • PORK BARRELING AND GREEN STALLING Back in April, NZ Transport Minister Phil Twyford lambasted critics who expressed doubts that the proposed Otaki – Levin expressway would go ahead, adding that, under the New Government: … nothing had changed with the progress of the Otaki to North of Levin (O2NL) expressway and that is was in the planning phase, exactly as it was before the recently released draft Government Policy Statement (GPS) on land transport. "Once route selection is finalised, there will be public consultation, then it will be up to the NZTA board to make the final selection". "The reason why the Transport Agency makes independent decisions about roading projects is that our Government refuses to engage in the disgraceful pork-barrelling we saw under the National government." Today we learn that: The future of a proposed expressway between Ōtaki and Levin, north of Wellington, appears more uncertain after the New Zealand Transport Agency said the potentially billion-dollar project was being "re-evaluated". Emma Speight, the agency's director of regional relationships, said the Ōtaki to Levin project needed "re-evaluation" to better align with the new Labour-led Government's transport policy which focuses more on rail projects and road safety. Speight said that overarching strategy strongly influenced which of the agency's projects and programmes of work would progress and when. "We acknowledge the frustration this may result in for communities and people affected by this project." Mr Twyford you can’t have it both ways:Either NZTA’s decision-making is independent or it is notEither major roading projects in the pipeline are grandfathered for completion or they are not. Letting the Green Tail Wag the Dog is surely no more a mark of Good Public Policy than Putting Lipstick on a Pig in a Poke. MORE AT https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/news/104633157/future-of-taki-to-levin-expressway-uncertain-after-nzta-says-it-is-being-reevaluated-and-reconsidered https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2018/04/otaki-levin-will-the-road-go-ahead.html https://www.nzherald.co.nz/wanganui-chronicle/horowhenua-chronicle/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503788&objectid=12031860

    • Hard Talk with Hannah Aizenman on Contemporary Poetry [from the New Yorker through Frontier Poetry]
      • 13 Jun 2018
      • Keith Johnson
      • As a platform for emerging poets, our mission is to provide practical help for serious writers. The community lifts itself up together or not at all. In that light, we’ve been asking some great editors from around the literary community for their frank thoughts on why poems may get accepted/rejected from their own slush pile of submissions, and what poets can do to better their chances. Today, we’re speaking with Hannah Aizenman, Poetry Coordinator of The New Yorker. From a craft standpoint, what causes you to accept a poem? Hannah Aizenman: I’ll preface my answer here by noting that, while I’m very involved in the reading process, the final decision always falls to the poetry editor, Kevin Young, who actually selects every poem that we publish in The New Yorker. That said, my most honest answer to this question is probably also a bit unhelpful: I don’t really know what moves me until I find it (and if I did, the purpose of my work would be somewhat defeated). What I mean is that I’m always after a poem that I haven’t seen before, a poem that makes something happen with language in a way I couldn’t or wouldn’t have imagined, a poem that creates the space in language for its own (and maybe other, heretofore-unfathomed poems’) possibility, even necessity. It’s not a matter of abstruseness—seemingly simple poems often open language to us (or vice versa) in powerful ways—but of clarity and confidence in the medium. Although the submissions toward which I gravitate are more different from one another than alike, their common thread, I think, is an earnest concern for and engagement with language. However that manifests stylistically, whatever the subject, I’m struck by a poem whose language feels honest, in the sense that it’s considered, urgent and specific to that poem’s particular project. Of the thousands of submitted poems I read, those that go on to appear in the magazine, and those that stick with me (the latter a larger category containing the former—inevitably, we receive more great writing than we are able to publish), seem to me events or occasions in themselves, managing to locate or create a sense of drama, of tension, within their very material, their attention to meaning and to music. I admire technical skill, but clever tricks and performative indulgences resonate far less than when a poem’s craft is in service to a real spirit of inquiry: when it genuinely wants to figure something out and requires these particular words, sounds, images, and spaces to do so—when the language is the story. I’m most intrigued and impressed when a poem seems to have surprised its author, because then it can surprise me. I love when a poem is, well, itself—whatever that may be.What advice do you have for new poets who are submitting work? Hannah Aizenman: I think right now is probably a particularly wonderful and difficult time to be a poet just starting to pursue publication. Largely because of the Internet, new poets are, or are capable of being, more educated and celebrated in their craft today than ever before. This, however, can pose its own obstacles when finding one’s footing: especially with social media, but even outside it, the poetry world can feel extremely public and fast-paced, creating a lot of pressure, actual and perceived. I’d encourage new poets to enjoy the benefits of our contemporary landscape—read widely (in and outside of what’s canonized, currently fashionable, and to your particular taste); form (symbiotic, non-exploitative) literary relationships and communities; seek out and create supportive opportunities and platforms—but also to be wary of its more insidious seductions. It’s crucial to allow ourselves the (head)space and time to discover and develop our own voices. In my experience, that can be very tough to do while dogged by more superficial “po-biz” preoccupations: if we believe we have to confine ourselves to a certain style or subject; if we value appearances, approval, and easy affirmation over our capacity for questioning; if we become more concerned with publication credits, prizes, and prestige than with poetry—that shows in the writing. Remember, the writing is the important part. Resist the impulse to shape or judge your work and worth as a writer according to illusory, capricious metrics—instead, hone your faculty for curiosity; learn to follow what truly interests, excites, perplexes, or pains you; put it in the poems. Poetry isn’t a means to an end—it doesn’t have to be competitively regimented in the way that capitalist-careerist culture pretends everything must. Prolificacy and popularity may be fine, but imagining they have any connection with poetry itself will drive you crazy; “playing the game” is all well and good, but pointless if it causes the poetry to suffer. It isn’t so simple, but, also, it is: write what you want to write, pursue what challenges you, remain open to possibility. There’s no magic key, no perfect hack, to unlock poetic “success”—and if there was, would any of us really want to know it? If there’s a secret, for me, it’s to focus on becoming the reader and the writer that you want to be—which is to say, on the reading and the writing. Be generous; trust yourself. Your love of the art is all you can really count on. Let the practice, the process, be what ultimately matters. Let it be enough.If there were one craft technique that you wish poets would focus on, what would it be? Hannah Aizenman: This is a hard question! Anything I would offer—“poets should strive for concrete imagery,” or whatever—might be true some of the time, but could never be true all the time, not for every poet or certainly every poem: some poems have no interest in and would not be improved by concrete imagery, and they’re not lesser poems for it. I guess metaphor comes to mind, metaphor in its in many forms, from idiom to allegory—any time we ask language to point in a direction away from itself, one word to illuminate another, which we do all the time and often unconsciously. I don’t necessarily believe that metaphor is the most important element of poetry—or, again, not of all poetry, all poems—but it’s often the place where I as a reader am best able to take a poem’s temperature. It’s a fairly reliable entry point for gauging a poem’s project, its handle on language, its sense of self-control—indeed, its sense of self. Metaphor lets us deftly perform a complex bit of alchemy—we say “love is a rose” (to use a cliché) to alter our understanding of love, but also of roses, and of love again—but it’s easy at once to get carried away with that power and to forget how deeply it pervades our regular vocabulary. It can betray a tendency toward indulgence or overwriting; metaphor, in many poems, proves merely ornamental, fails to pull its weight. It’s also a common site of imprecision, confusion: I often trip over some “x is y” statement (or other construction) and get distracted wondering, well, is it? Not literally—obviously, the point is that it’s figurative, but there should still be some truth, or some productive falseness, in it—so maybe the issue has less to do with accuracy than with purpose: not whether x is actually y, but the ways in which x could be y, or why one might suggest it; what happens in the poem, in the mind, as a result. I wish poets would focus on the metaphors they employ—what they do, and where they’re placed, and how they work, and why; finding not the “best” ones, but the right ones for this particular poem, wielding them skillfully and effectively in this specific context—but that care could be applied to any and every craft technique. As poets, we’re always amateurs, asking, “What serves this poem?”—it’s the first time, every time.How many rejections have you faced and how do you deal with them? Hannah Aizneman: I get rejected constantly! In truth, it doesn’t bother me terribly, I guess partly because I’m used enough to rejection by now to generally anticipate it; it rarely comes as a surprise. I submit work at a pretty glacial pace, and when I do, I tend to think of it a bit like playing the lottery, with comparable odds: I’m hopeful but not expectant, and I remind myself that even if I don’t “win,” I really won’t have lost anything—and, anyway, no one else is keeping score. To make oneself vulnerable is to take a risk, and while we obviously always want to hear a “yes,” I don’t believe that there’s anything inherently wrong with a “no”. This sounds counterintuitive, but I try to treat rejection almost as an opportunity. It’s a chance, like any piece of feedback, for me to ask myself: is there something I should change, or do I stand by what I’ve done? Either way, the outcome is (or can be) positive; perhaps I notice room for revision where I didn’t before, or, alternately, I’m challenged to defend my choices once again to my harshest critic—myself. Even if I truly thought a poem would have been a perfect fit for the journal I sent it to, and even if it hurts to learn otherwise, which it sometimes does, that rejection sends me back to the work, where I belong. It returns me to where I began, to what I actually care about, which is writing. (This perspective is also influenced, to some degree, by my job, probably the least fun part of which is sending some hundreds of rejections every month, often to writers I deeply respect and admire—many of them astronomically more experienced and accomplished than I—and often when I truly appreciate the work I’m declining. When I get down about being on the other side, then, the receiving end, I consider that—do I honestly imagine that I am uniquely above rejection? How could I? Silly.) Rejection is par for the course; globally, the rule, not the exception. Every time I submit, I invite a potential rejection, and if—when—it arrives, I try to meet it (as I would an acceptance) with graciousness and discipline. Hannah Aizenman holds an MFA in poetry from New York University and works as poetry coordinator for The New Yorker. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Bodega, BOAAT, Sycamore Review, Black Warrior Review, and Gigantic Sequins. Born and raised in Birmingham, AL, she now lives in Brooklyn.

    • Fireball
      • 13 Jun 2018
      • Eye of the Fish
      • The ghost of Grenfell has come back to visit us, with the announcement of 18 buildings in Wellington with possible flammable cladding. Similarly, in Auckland, they have announced at the same time that they also have a list of buildings with ACP cladding, including 116 with the same type of core that Grenfell had. Precinct Properties in Auckland had this to say: “Their reports confirmed a very low level of risk due to the significant levels of fire prevention and safety systems installed, the dual fire escapes available on each floor and the low level of risk for an external source of ignition.” And that’s a fairly good assessment of the risk. I’m glad we are confident that we have a good, reliable system – as the Eye of the Fish said at the time last year, Grenfell was a disgrace and should never have happened if decent fire protection systems had been put in place. News from the Inquiry into the Grenfell fire going on in the UK at present show that as much as two hours into the fire, the British fire crews were still telling people to stay in their apartments and not try and escape down the solitary fire escape staircase. Incredible. And: stupid. So: is yours one of the 18 Wellington buildings with potential flammable cladding? So far, WCC aren’t telling us which ones are, but you’re always welcome to discuss things in confidence here on the Fish… “The council did not identify the buildings requiring further assessment, saying it wanted to give building owners time to respond to letters and advise tenants where necessary.”

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