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      • Bay View 063
        • 14 Jun 2014
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View - Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Issue 063, May 2014 Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held at The Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Oriental Parade at 7.30 pm on Tuesday 29th May 2014. All residents of Oriental Bay are welcome 7.30pm Get-together (complimentary drink and nibbles) 8.00pm Report from the committee • Receive the Annual Report and audited Financial Statements • Consider the re-election of the Auditor • Elect the Officers and Executive Committee President’s Report At the time of writing this report we are enjoying a wonderful “Indian” summer and are reminded how fortunate we are to live in this great part of Wellington City. From the committee’s point of view it has been a relatively quiet year but change is constant in today’s world. For example we have experienced some inconvenience as Chorus goes about installing fibre cable in our suburb, we have seen the closure of Martin Bosley’s long established restaurant, the change of ownership of the Fisherman’s Table (now called Blue Water) and the White House is to be relocated to the new Clyde Quay Apartments building. The agreement between the Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club and the Wellington City Council to work together on a significant revamp of the yacht club marina, will open up this area to the to the public as well as strengthening the sport of yachting in our City. The club CEO Dean Stanley has indicated that work could commence in 2016 and take about 1 year. Occupation of the impressive 1 Clyde Quay Apartments will probably have commenced by the time of our 2014 AGM on 29 May. Oriental Bay Residents will have their own views as to the merits of these changes on the waterfront but there is no doubt that these two major developments will provide a significant uplift to the northern pedestrian entrance to Oriental Bay. The committee has met twice since the General Meeting in November. No major new issues have arisen. This report covers the following current events and topics: further investigation of the replacement of the IIott swimming rafts, Committee, web site and communication, membership and finance, and issues referred to Council, and General Meeting. Swimming Rafts The high level of usage of the rafts over February and March demonstrates that Wellingtonians and visitors do appreciate these facilities. The Council has agreed that provided we can raise the necessary funds (approximately $15000) then they will take over the responsibility of ownership and maintenance of the rafts. The Harbour Ranger will continue to look after the annual mooring and winter storage of the rafts. We have applied to one of the major community funding agencies for around 80% of the funds and the Association will demonstrate local support for the project by providing the balance of funds from our accumulated reserves. We should know the results of the funding application within 2-3 months. If we do not raise the required amount we will need to consider other fund raising options. Website Mary Wareham, now based in Washington, continues to provide management of our web site and after some months of effort has been able to find a new host for the site after the original host terminated the arrangement. Unfortunately some information on the site has been lost as a result of the change and Mary will be progressively restoring it. The committee want to improve communication with members and we can utilise the site to advise members of matters of interest that arise between the half-yearly issues of Bay View. Once Mary has completed the restoration please help us with this objective by logging in to http://orientalbay.org . nz/?page id = 12 and complete and send the “contact us” information. In the “subject” section just insert .. email address advice.” Once we have that information you will automatically be advised by email whenever new information is entered on the site. Membership and Finance Currently paid up membership is 218 households. (213 last year). We encourage new residents to come along to the AGM and/or join the Association. Accumulated funds are approximately $16,000. Matters for the Attention of Council At the last committee meeting we identified a few issues which have been referred to the City Council for attention. these included the removal of the nonsensical wine trail sign at the western end of Oriental Bay; the risk to pedestrians from cars failing to observe the compulsory stop at the exit to the Freyberg Pool car park; the untidy state of the zig zag path from Oriental Terrace up to the Monastery and long standing potholes in the narrowest part of Hay Street. We will report on Councils’ response at the AGM. Annual General Meeting Notice of the AGM is included in this newsletter. Following a brief report from the Committee we can look forward to an interesting presentation from Mr. Jim Lynch QSM, the founder of Zealandia. Jim’s topic will be “The Changing Ecology of Greater Wellington.” Thanks Thanks to honorary editor Jackie Pope, assistant honorary editor Val Browning, regular contributor Judith Doyle and others who have contributed to this issue of Bay View. This publication is made possible by the financial support we receive from our advertisers. Please give them your support in return. We also acknowledge the financial contribution from the Wellington City Council. On behalf of the Executive Committee Colin Blair, President JUDITH DOYLE OBRA is fortunate to have Judith Doyle as a meme=ber and regular contributor to “Bay View.” Judith Doyle is an award-winning travel writer. In 1990 she was named NZ Travel Writer of the Year and she won the Pacific Asia Travel Story Gold Award in 1993. Many of her publications draw on her experience and love of travel and outdoor activities. Older and Bolder (2004) recounts Judith Doyle’s exploration of the New Zealand outdoors and various outdoor adventures, while Tea with my Tapas (2007) is a frank and often funny look at her travels in Spain. Please accept our grateful thanks Judith for the wonderful contributions you make. You do a marvellous job researching and each one has made interesting reading. FROM THE PAST — It is 50 years on 2 May since the last tram ran through the streets of Wellington – this para is from the Evening Post 2 May 1964. For the Love of Animals by Judith Doyle Local animal-lover, Barbara Gordon, is absolutely delighted with the recently opened SPCA premises in the Old Fever Hospital on Mt Victoria. She has volunteered for the SPCA for some 30 years now … and counting. Her involvement began in the 1970s at the increasingly-inadequate premises in Newtown. She was on the committee then and included dog-walking amongst her volunteering duties. After a short break, she became involved again three or four years ago. A long-time cat-lover (she has four cats in her Bayview home) she donated the Cat Wing in the new building. She is on the Board there and does a weekly stint on the front desk to help, direct and welcome visitors. After an 8-year battle to secure the premises, it’s easy to understand the joy of the staff, the volunteers and – not to forget – the animals who have been found to be much calmer and happier here. The new premises are three times the area of the old and much quieter, surrounded as they are by the open space and greenness of the Town Belt. The building has been earthquake-strengthened and refurbished at a cost of about $3.5million. The conversion is now virtually complete and Barbara pays tribute to Catherine Torrance who was project manager – “she did a marvellous job, she really did.” The building consists of an education centre and a veterinary wing with new hospital facilities where unwell animals undergo operations and are nursed back to health. Then there’s the extensive adoption area devoted to the everlasting quest to find permanent homes for the animals – there has been a 30% increase in adoptions since they moved to the new premises. Another long-term quest is for the finance still needed. “We have another million dollars to raise,” Barbara said. One of the fundraising events they encourage, is for others to hire part of the premises. “We have children’s parties up there; there’s a conference room for hire and animal-lovers could even have weddings up there!” There are plans for a dog-friendly cafe later on, too. The building is an attractive example of the Arts and Crafts style with its spreadeagled shape and long verandahs. It was built between 1918-1920 as a Fever Hospital for patients with infectious diseases. Many of those treated were Tb sufferers. Others were soldiers returning from World War I who had fallen victim to the influenza pandemic – more than 700 are said to have died from the flu in the Wellington region alone. In 1969 the name changed to the Chest Hospital which operated for 12 years before it closed. Seven years later the building became the Wellington Polytechnic Conservatory of Music and was used for rehearsals up to 1998. This was followed by many years of neglect, uncertainty, interspersed by hopeful plans by the SPCA that petered out. The buildings were getting more and more derelict. But finally the WCC and the SPCA came to an agreement and renovations got going smartly. The grand opening was held in February of this year. Table Tennis Club Started A daytime table tennis group has been established at the stadium on Mt Victoria. Play is on Monday mornings and Wednesday afternoons. There are 10 tables – room for more members. Bats and balls are provided initially and the first day is free. It’s a game that can be continued into the senior years. In fact, a heart imaging specialist in America has been researching the benefits of playing social table tennis and claims that it not only exercises every part of the body but also activates the brain. Developing ball skills improves eve/hand co-ordination, balance, flexibility, reactions and quickness of mind, he reported, as well as increasing the heart rate and strengthening the heart and the muscles of the body. There’s no subscription – it’s $4 per session including refreshments. Phone Diana on 801-9556 or email Winnich@xtra.co.nz -Ed. WRITING ABOUT CHURCHILL By Wyn Beasley There have been mountains of books about Churchill over the years, but not too many have emanated from New Zealand; and there had been only one about his health when, in 2004, my copy of Churchill: a life arrived from the Folio Society. As I read this ‘short version’ of the official biography which had occupied first son Randolph and then Martin Gilbert for twenty-odd years, I realised two things: that it included mention of a multitude of injuries and ailments that should have killed Winston Churchill long before he reached the age of 90; and that the existing book about his health left a bit to be desired. That had been written by his personal physician from 1940, Sir Charles Wilson, who became Lord Moran, and it was controversial at the time it was published, because it breached patient confidentiality and had been brought out with almost indecent haste after its subject’s death. But over the years it had acquired a gloss of ‘authenticity’ and had contributed to the emergence of two durable Churchill myths: that Churchill had suffered from depression-as-a-disease and was close to being an alcoholic. As I started to study Churchill’s ailments in more detail, I began to uncover more that was dubious in the Moran version, which its author had called Churchill: the struggle for survival. His story did not stack up in places: it claimed to have been derived ‘from the diaries of Lord Moran’ and individual entries were headed with dates. But Martin Gilbert recorded that, when he tried to get the original diary entry for a particular date, he learned that there was no record of that date, and Moran’s papers ‘were not a diary in the ordinary sense of the word’. Then I came across an astonishing item in Moran’s book: describing an episode of pneumonia in 1943, he remarked, ‘Apart from his appendix, he had never been seriously ill, and his attention was caught by the high fever; his imagination did the rest.’ Now I had already documented a large collection of illnesses and injuries prior to 1943: these included episodes of childhood pneumonia in pre-antibiotic days when pneumonia was a killer; a hernia in childhood, a 9-metre fall from a tree which immobilised him for a couple of months; a shoulder dislocation which became recurrent; a car accident which paralysed him briefly, a paratyphoid infection from which he bled profusely.. I began to wonder what was going on – and the only explanation that holds water was that Moran wanted to document how he, the loyal physician, had kept a wreck of a prime minister alive from 1940 to 1965. So here we were with an 800-page book which might or might not be true, and there was obviously a place for a fuller and more reliable account – and preferably one shorter than 800 pages. I was fortunate enough to be able to spend a month in Cambridge in 2006, living in Churchill College and plundering the resources of their Archives Centre, which is the jewel in the crown of that college; and I have been favoured by the reminiscences of a number of people who were associated with Sir Winston. Myoid friend Sir Peter de la Billiere, who is an old boy of Harrow and remembers a Churchill visit to the school, not only contributed a foreword but was the catalyst of the whole project, and opened many doors for me. When I was wondering who might publish a book whose major market would be in England, I came across a book of drawings and reminiscences by Jack Chalker, who had been a prisoner of the Japanese on the infamous Burma railway and was recruited by the legendary Weary Dunlop as his masseur (but actually his artist) in the camp hospital. It was an interesting book because, apart from anything else, the artists who risked their lives making sketches of the conditions they were kept in, were to produce the only ‘hard evidence’ of their captivity – Chalker’S drawings were used at the Tokyo war trials. This was an interesting book, but also beautifully produced. On a whim I contacted the publisher, at Mells in Somerset, and found him interested. Charles Moore, the official biographer of Margaret Thatcher, gave it a kindly review in the Telegraph and the recent review in the New Zealand Listener has been encouraging. And now I have an offer to issue it as an e-book. It has been an interesting enterprise for an old ex-surgeon, serendipity all the way – and books, unlike patients, don’t get sick in the night. Churchill: the supreme survivor. Mercer Books, Mells, Somerset. 2013. Hardback; 200 pp, illustrated. Website: www.churchillsupremesurvivor.co.uk “ACHIEVING YOUR GOALS IS EASIER WITH THE RIGHT ADVICE” Local Wins Lifetime Achievement Award. Oriental Bay resident, Graham Stewart, is pictured here (left) receiving the National Press Club’s Lifetime Achievement Award from Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown and club vice-president, Peter Bush. Graham Stewart was the seventh recipient of this award. He was the first cameraman to receive the award which is only presented every five years “and I started with a box brownie,” he said. A few of Graham Stewart’s career highlights as a press photographer were outlined by the Mayor. They included his coverage of the 1951 waterfront strike, the pivotal post World War II labour relations and the terrible Tangiwai disaster. His photographic career started on the New Zealand Herald and continued on the provincial circuit before he returned to the Herald as illustrations editor. He held this position for many years. He later entered book publishing as an executive director of AH & AW Reed, the Wellington-based publishing house which used to be so dominant in the market. When Reeds faltered, the Mayor said, Graham seized the opportunity to start his own imprint, Grantham House. Non-fiction books on New Zealand and its cities were published, including two monumental works on Wellington. In uncertain publishing times, Grantham House continues to flourish. In his reply Graham Stewart described the early days of his 60 plus career, well before television and hourly radio news. “All newspaper people had to be correctly dressed – we all wore collar and tie even when covering rugby on the sideline,” he said. He went on to describe the cameras back then, which were “as large as a six-pack of beer”. Glass negative plates were used and, when on out-of-town assignments, changing bags with holes for the arms to be inserted had to be used. Before light meters came along, chemical and photographic formulas had to be mixed. For flash photography you had to use a handkerchief to remove a very hot bulb before replacing it with another. There was usually only one chance for a photo at VIP events, as you had to change the plate manually and re-cock the camera shutter – by which time the VIP in question could well have gone. He added some further historic events he’d covered – Royal tours of the 1950s; Sir Edmund Hillary’s wedding to Louise Rose; the last TEAL flying boat taking off for Sydney; the visit to New Zealand of Nat King Cole and also Vice-president Nixon. “I was present at the signing of the contract to build the Auckland harbour bridge … I was sitting in the co-pilot’s seat when dare-devil Freddie Ladd flew (illegally) under the bridge before the official opening”. In his early years in book publishing, book designers had to cut and paste with a scalpel every strip of typography on to each page of a book over a light box. They worked with long galleys of type produced on the old linotype machines. “Technology has certainly brought unbelievable changes to all forms of the printed word – and photography – since I started on the road.” The award ceremony took place late last year at the Wellington City Council THE BAY WALKERS – XMAS 2013 WALK by Susan Wagenhofer 5 years, or 260 Mondays ago I went on my first Oriental Bay Monday Morning Walk. That friend who opened this door for me has since moved up to Hawkes Bay. I miss her company and appreciate this legacy. It did not take long to realize how lucky I was to have landed an address on Oriental Parade in Oriental Bay. More than a parade of shops and flats, it is a close, vibrant (neighbourly) neighbourhood. Unlike other neighbourhoods, everyone here lives on the same side of the street and shares the same view, though not always the same viewpoint. The Monday Morning Walkers, a diverse and energetic group of women total approximately 21. Men are discouraged. Walks are vigorous, fast paced and hilly. Every walk is a good one and starts the week off with resolve. Wind direction and a cafe are serious things to consider when deciding the route. Coffee plays an essential role. A long black had better be hot, a decent cremora must be apparent, and cappuccino w/chocolate, whether trim or regular should not be forgotten. I could never miss a Monday Walk, or I would never have known which restaurant to try, or what part of New Zealand I should visit next, or who was in and out in politics. More books, films, art exhibitions (in and out of the country), ballets and trips abroad have been discussed. Many global & health problems were solved while heaving ourselves up through the bush to Mt Vic. or careening along the fox line in Brooklyn’s Central Park. This group had been walking many years before I stumbled onto them and their established traditions. The annual Christmas Walk held each December unites this group and is the only walk where everyone comes on the day. It is more of an amble where all catch up with each other en masse. Each Christmas Walk is memorable, probably most memorable for the three women slated each year having the task of planning the route and organizing the lunch. Where we go, how we go and where we eat are closely guarded secrets until THE DAY. No spoilers allowed. December 2013′s IT GIRLS, Viv Callendar, Cathy Kennedy-Good, and Annabel Leask orchestrated an exceptional Team Christmas Walk. One Monday, in early December, we trooped to Central Station commandeered the rail car to Silver Stream and continued on our way. Crossing the bridge we cut across fields in the sun onto the St Patrick’s College campus. Ahead, in the shade of trees r an impromptu outdoor cafe was assembled, complete with tablecloth, steaming coffee in blue and white cups, juice, platters of strawberries, cherries and cheese biscuits (All wanted the recipe) Julie O’Connor stationed here with Faith Taylor, efficient baristas provided morning tea. On we walked, past the golf course, through Barton’s Bush, down garden alleyways and paths opening up into a private back garden. No lunch in sight, another red herring. This was the champagne stop. Just a few minutes on, the trail ended at the Fig Cafe in Lower Hutt. This former church fellowship hall sat prepped, ready for us and for Christmas. A long banquet table lined one wall set for our lunch. A ninjas appeared with generous bowls and platters of well -dressed salads, tasty savoury quiches and breads. Good food, good wine and especially good company marked the day. Back onto the train and into Wellington this group of long time and comfortable friends enjoyed a day they will continue to share. I will leave New Zealand in June and return to the United States. Fortunately, they have Mondays there also. The Vermont branch of the Monday Morning Oriental Bay Walkers will be in full swing by September. All are welcome (no men). INTERESTING TITBITS ABOUT WAITANGI PARK by Renee Sara While surfing the net one day, I came across some interesting information about our wonderful Waitangi Park on Wellington Waterfront’s website, www.wellingtonwaterfront.co.nz. It all started from a Google search when I was wondering how come Waitangi Park was still beautifully green when Wellington City Council had stopped watering other parks in the city. You may remember the summer we were all urged to conserve water. I know this is something we rain-rich Wellingtonians don’t normally have as front-of-mind, despite the fact that we should always be conscious of our use of such a precious resource, but this time – we were warned – we were at a crisis point as we only had one emergency reservoir in Upper Hutt (the other one was getting an upgrade). What I found is that Waitangi Park isn’t just useful and attractive; its design is also very practical – which meant that all Oriental Bay Residents continued to enjoy beautiful green grass and happy trees when all other council parks were getting very very brown. It all starts with the Waitangi Stream – an important fresh water resource once used by the local Maori for catching eel (tuna) as they were heading out to sea. The designers “daylighted” the Waitangi Stream, bringing it above ground and channelling it through both artificial and natural treatment systems, treatment that includes the wetlands within the Park. Those lovely and full rain clouds we can get here in Wellington add to the stream’s generosity. In urban areas, often the first lot of rainwater runoff holds a lot of oils, hard material (such as rubbish people haven’t disposed of well) and other pollutants. Normally this flows directly into the sea via the stormwater systems all cities have. However, around Waitangi Park, the stormwaters are diverted to go through the same filtering systems as the stream goes through. This collected and cleaned water is then either used for irrigating Waitangi Park or it’s discharged in its much cleaner form into the harbour. And it doesn’t have to be immediately used or discarded. The wetlands operate as a storage lagoon for holding the water before it’s used to irrigate the park and the neighbouring plants. So 100% of Waitangi Park’s irrigation comes from renewable water sources, rather than the town supply. The next time you’re up early in the morning and see the sprinklers doing their stuff you can remember that, thanks to clever and sustainable design by the Wellington Waterfront, Waitangi Park and its environs isn’t just pretty; it’s good for the environment too. Love it! HOLOCAUST CENTRE OF NEW ZEALAND by Jackie Pope Why teach New Zealand children about the Holocaust? What relevance does the Holocaust have for New Zealanders? How did something like this happen? What can we do about it? These and other questions are addressed at the Holocaust Centre of New Zealand located in the Wellington Jewish Community Centre at 80 Webb Street. It aims to collect and share stories of New Zealand survivors, helpers and witnesses and works to promote individual responsibility and respect for diversity and human rights. It is open daily Sunday to Friday (except for Jewish and other holidays) from 10 am to 1 pm. Telephone 801 9480. There is a time-line showing events in Europe and events at the same time in New Zealand, folders indicating what the government knew about what was happening in Europe, what the New Zealand people knew, and what the Jewish community knew. Stories are told of New Zealand survivors of the Holocaust, their and their families’ lives before World War II, the war years, how they came to New Zealand, and their lives here post war. A letter from a New Zealand soldier details his horror at the conditions at one of the camps. Another display tells of the Deckstons, a childless Jewish couple who, seeing what was happening, travelled to Europe in the 1930s and brought 20 Jewish orphans to New Zealand. A number of thought provoking quotations, e.g., “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing.” (Edmund Burke) are depicted on the walls of the Centre. DVDs of survivor stories can be played. The Centre’s website www.holocaustcentre.org.nzgives links to other Holocaust centres all over the world. School groups are frequent visitors to the centre. The consequences of discrimination and bullying are readily discussed with them. Other community groups such as Probus, church groups, or Rotary clubs, as well as individual visitors are always welcome. HELPING US LOOK AFTER OUR PATCH by Judith Doyle Wellington City Council is to be congratulated in creating the new position of ‘graffiti programme advisor’. Hine Sullivan was appointed to the Wellington-wide role in 2013. Her prompt action in getting tagging removed from the popular zig-zag footpath between the Monastery and Oriental Bay has already earned her much appreciation from locals. Hine Sullivan was a Police Officer for 23 years. As a member of the community policinq section in Porirua in the late 90s early 2000s she worked to reduce graffiti in the central retail area. Duties included youth aid, youth education and community pollcinq. Over time, this led to less shoplifting, school truancy and car theft in Porirua. A diversion scheme was initiated, as part of this project, for offenders under 17 . This included cleaning off local graffiti, mowing lawns for elderly residents, community clean-ups and rubbish disposal – time allocated depended on the type of offence. “This made offenders accountable,” said Hine, “but it also gave police the chance to nip offending in the bud before it escalated. For many of the youth involved, this short sharp wake-up call was enough to stop their offending. “Police deployments in Solomon Islands, Bougainville (Papua New Guinea) and Tonga followed which led to her most recent position as security manager for World Vision International. Her job there was to monitor the safety and security of all World Vision staff working in the above three countries plus Vanuatu and Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor). It involved assessing security in the remote areas staff were working in and training staff to manage their own wellbeing during times of unrest. Though offered an extended term she returned home to support her 88-year-old father. In her new job as WCC graffiti advisor she wants to encourage residents and business owners to report concerns, like tagging, first to the Police, then the Council. She also wants to correct the perception that the Council will remove tagging at no cost to the owner of the building. To prevent tagging she encourages community-led projects, such as identifying areas for murals and developing ‘green’ walls with appropriate planting. She believes residents can help to discourage graffiti by: • improved lighting • trimming trees • joining neighbourhood groups and getting to know neighbour • reporting offences/suspicious persons to Police • clearing graffiti as soon as it appears. Experience shows that particular places which tend to attract tagging include areas with a high volume of foot traffic; walkways; poorly-lit areas and sites not visible to the general public. MARKING A LANDING SITE ON THE BAY by Judith Doyle At the city-end of Oriental Bay is Te Waka Pou, the pole marking what was once a waka landing site. By Ra Vincent, it was installed six years ago and has become a distinctive feature of Oriental Bay in that time. It combines stylised waka prows made with two totara beams. These are linked by ornate bronze koru patterns which suggest water effects. It sits on a base of volcanic rock (andesite) from Taranaki. It certainly makes a striking statement by Chaffers Marina – a symbolic beacon for those sailing into the harbour. The sculpture’s artist, Ra Vincent, is also responsible for two other sculptures on the waterfront. One – on the south side of the boardwalk at the corner of Lambton Quay and Molesworth Street – also represents a waka. This one, of white cement and marble, depicts a waka that has been upended at the end of the day’s use. His third waterfront sculpture is an anchor stone. Positioned in Civic Square, it is carved from Taranaki andesite. To suggest age and frequent use it is polished around the hole where the rope goes. It commemorates the location’s earlier function as a fishing spot. Ra Vincent is one of three men (with Simon Bright and Dan Hennah) from the Hobbit production design team who were nominated for the 2014 Academy Awards for their work on the set of the first Hobbit movie. They missed out on that elusive Oscar but being nominated is no small feat in itself. Ra is set decorator on the Hobbit Trilogy, so there’ll probably be a next time! ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC COMMITTEE 2013 —2014 President: Colin Blair Vice-President: John Larkindale Minute Secretary: Renee Sara Hon Treasurer: David Hogg Committee Everard Aspell Kay Austad Val Browning Maurice Clark Peter Hatfield Jackie Pope John Prendergast Andy Thomson LIST OF MEMBERS: 31 MARCH 2014 Life Member: Mrs Jane Aim Mr JK Alexander Mrs Jill Allen Athol & Glenys Arthur Mr & Mrs David & Justine Ashe Everard & Antonella Aspell David & Anke Atkins Kay Austad Dr & Mrs W Austad Yvonne Bacon Elizabeth Barrett Virginia Barton Chapple Mr & Mrs AW & AM Beasley Mr & Mrs Brian & Sylvia Bennett Jenny & Phil Bentley Trevor & Moreen Beyer David & Madeleine Black Colin & Judy Blair Jan Bolton & Graeme Perry Eugene Bowen & Elizabeth Ellis Mrs Alison Bowie Max & Rosemary Bradford Virginia Breen Malcolm & Anita Brown Val & Dave Browning Anthony & Jean Byrne Nick & Mariana Calavrias Rodney & Vivien Callender Mike Camp & Anne Gaskell Mrs JC Campbell Jean Cashin Warren & Bev Charlton Rick & Lorraine Christie Mr RJ Christmas Kaye & Maurice Clark Les & Colleen Clark Ngaire Clark Mrs Gaynor Clarke Susie & Richard Clarke W & R Coffey Paul Coltart & Kerry Borewicz Lady P A Cooke G Corleison Logan Cowdell & Jessi Morgan Peter Cullen Ann & Rick Curtis John & Gill Davis Shirley Day C & P Diessl Robin Dossor Judith Doyle Diana Duff-Staniland Mark & Dorothy Dunajtschik Angela Duncan & Greg Cotmore Ms Joy Durrant Mr & Mrs DK & SM Emanuel Mr & Mrs David & Beth Evans Tim & Margaret Fairhall Anne & Richard Field Mrs Margaret Findlay Annette Finlayson Mrs Vicky Floratos Denis Foot & Sue Kedgley Molli & Michael Gibbs-Harris Sheryn Gieck Arch Gilchrist Rona Glover Ross & Lynda Graham Mrs Marion Grant Mr & Mrs Douglas & Adrienne Gribben John & Pauline Hanning Clemency Harding-Brow Mrs Pauline Hastings Peter Hatfield & Suzanne Blumhardt Mr & Mrs Douglas & Helene Hay Tore Hayward & Victoria Stace Pieter Hibma David & Margaret Hogg Peter Hollier Mark Horgan Mark & Gillian Horton Jan & Malcolm Hughes Carl & Valerie Jackson Brendon Jacobsen Stuart & Trish Jameson Mr & Mrs George & Judy Janis Joan Jarden Sir John Jeffries Pamela Jeffries Richard & Nicky Johnson Mr & Mrs Bryan Johnson Sue Johnstone Mr & Mrs Peter & Lesley Jones Mrs Barbara Kedgley Mr & Mrs Len & Eileen Kenna Mrs M K Keyes Erika Kremic Mrs Ruth Lane John & Philippa Larkindale Mr & Mrs Peter & Jill Lemmon Bruce & Gwen Levick David Levick Mrs Robin Lockie Hon John Luxton & Ms Mary Scholtens Brian & Jan Lynch Mr & Mrs Peter & Margaret MacDonald Don & Maria Mackay Mr & Mrs Jim & Joan Malcolm Mr & Mrs Roger & Sherry Manthel Maurice & Lynne Manttan Mrs S J Martin Ross & Treena Martin Mr & Mrs H & R Matias Mr & Mrs RB & VP McCay Mr & Mrs J & MP McIlwaine John & Erica McLean Murray & Sue McNae Jim Meachen Mr & Mrs B & P Melville Mrs PM Miles Roger & Alex Miller Duncan Milne & Claire Campbell Mrs Pauline Mitchell Gareth & Jo Morgan Richard & Jenny Nanson Mr & Mrs OR & DM Nees Mike & Jude Nelson Mr and Mrs Tom & Dorothy Neve Andy Newport Mrs Judith Newport Deb & Matt Nichols Rex Nicholls & Kerry Prendergast Mary & Rod Oakly Janet Okkerse & Tony Hamilton David & Kate Ongley Brian & Anne O’Sullivan Mr & Mrs I.C. Patience Mr Frank Pearson Miss Kathleen Phelan Capt MC & JM Pinnell WH & EL Pitt Euan & Linda Playle John & Jill Prendergast Rod & Di Preston Mr & Mrs Bryan & Anna Pocock Joe & Jackie Pope Barry & Francie Possenniskie Collin Post Mrs Ann Rendel Dave & Jan Renwick Audrey Richter Alastair & Marilyn Roger Mr & Mrs Henk & Mineke Rood Mr & Mrs Ron & Jan Rosenberg Kushla Roughton & Nigel Moody Valerie & John Roy Mr & Mrs Garry & Janice Rudings Arthur & Janet Salek Jacinda & Derek Samuel Brian & Renee Sara Mr & Mrs GEK Sare Mrs Grace N Scarrott Don & Pat Scott Mrs Merilyn Scott Anne Selwyn Mr & Mrs R & C Selwyn Lesley & Michael Shanahan Mr & Mrs GR & AC Sharp Helen Shaw A & G Short Peter Smith Ms Adrienne Smith Paul Spackman Hilda & Geoff Stedman Mr & Mrs Graham & Anne Stewart Mr & Mrs Ian & Heather Stewart Richard Stone Gordon & Kathryn Swan Alison Sweetman Chris & Robyn Sygrove Mrs P D Symes Walter & Michelle Szeto John & Odette Tait Mrs Faith Taylor Tony & Julie Thomas Andy & Sue Thomson Ed Tingey & Helen Foot Warren Tocker & Karen McLeay Helen Todd John & Tina Todd Mrs Krystine Tomaszyk Mr & Mrs Peter & Judy Travers Mr & Mrs Peter & Theadora Varuhas Margaret Waddy Drs Freda Walker & Donald Poirier Mr & Mrs Peter & Beryl Warnock Sharryn Waters Mr & Mrs EC Watson Peter & Jill Watson Bryan & Patricia Watts Mike & Liz Welch Jeanette & Terry Wellington Joan Wells Miss G L West George & Jeanette Westermayer Bryan & Jill Weyburne David Whittaker & Robyn Trail Kay & Glen Wiggs Sally & Chris Wilkinson Mrs Ngaire Williams Diana Winn Ron & Jane Woodrow Jane Wrightson Annabel Young James & Mary Elizabeth Young Dom & Carole Zame Members’ Comments & Suggestions The Committee is keen to hear your opinions and comments about life
in the Bay. Any issues that you think should be brought to our attention do let us know. Send your suggestion to the President. I wish to join your Association (Sub $15 single / $20 double) Name: Address: Post to:
 The Treasurer 
Oriental Bay Residents’ Assn Inc #          #          #

      • Bay View 063
        • 28 May 2014
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View - Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Issue 063, May 2014 Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held at The Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Oriental Parade at 7.30 pm on Tuesday 29th May 2014. All residents of Oriental Bay are welcome 7.30pm Get-together (complimentary drink and nibbles) 8.00pm Report from the committee • Receive the Annual Report and audited Financial Statements • Consider the re-election of the Auditor • Elect the Officers and Executive Committee President’s Report At the time of writing this report we are enjoying a wonderful “Indian” summer and are reminded how fortunate we are to live in this great part of Wellington City. From the committee’s point of view it has been a relatively quiet year but change is constant in today’s world. For example we have experienced some inconvenience as Chorus goes about installing fibre cable in our suburb, we have seen the closure of Martin Bosley’s long established restaurant, the change of ownership of the Fisherman’s Table (now called Blue Water) and the White House is to be relocated to the new Clyde Quay Apartments building. The agreement between the Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club and the Wellington City Council to work together on a significant revamp of the yacht club marina, will open up this area to the to the public as well as strengthening the sport of yachting in our City. The club CEO Dean Stanley has indicated that work could commence in 2016 and take about 1 year. Occupation of the impressive 1 Clyde Quay Apartments will probably have commenced by the time of our 2014 AGM on 29 May. Oriental Bay Residents will have their own views as to the merits of these changes on the waterfront but there is no doubt that these two major developments will provide a significant uplift to the northern pedestrian entrance to Oriental Bay. The committee has met twice since the General Meeting in November. No major new issues have arisen. This report covers the following current events and topics: further investigation of the replacement of the IIott swimming rafts, Committee, web site and communication, membership and finance, and issues referred to Council, and General Meeting. Swimming Rafts The high level of usage of the rafts over February and March demonstrates that Wellingtonians and visitors do appreciate these facilities. The Council has agreed that provided we can raise the necessary funds (approximately $15000) then they will take over the responsibility of ownership and maintenance of the rafts. The Harbour Ranger will continue to look after the annual mooring and winter storage of the rafts. We have applied to one of the major community funding agencies for around 80% of the funds and the Association will demonstrate local support for the project by providing the balance of funds from our accumulated reserves. We should know the results of the funding application within 2-3 months. If we do not raise the required amount we will need to consider other fund raising options. Website Mary Wareham, now based in Washington, continues to provide management of our web site and after some months of effort has been able to find a new host for the site after the original host terminated the arrangement. Unfortunately some information on the site has been lost as a result of the change and Mary will be progressively restoring it. The committee want to improve communication with members and we can utilise the site to advise members of matters of interest that arise between the half-yearly issues of Bay View. Once Mary has completed the restoration please help us with this objective by logging in to http://orientalbay.org . nz/?page id = 12 and complete and send the “contact us” information. In the “subject” section just insert .. email address advice.” Once we have that information you will automatically be advised by email whenever new information is entered on the site. Membership and Finance Currently paid up membership is 218 households. (213 last year). We encourage new residents to come along to the AGM and/or join the Association. Accumulated funds are approximately $16,000. Matters for the Attention of Council At the last committee meeting we identified a few issues which have been referred to the City Council for attention. these included the removal of the nonsensical wine trail sign at the western end of Oriental Bay; the risk to pedestrians from cars failing to observe the compulsory stop at the exit to the Freyberg Pool car park; the untidy state of the zig zag path from Oriental Terrace up to the Monastery and long standing potholes in the narrowest part of Hay Street. We will report on Councils’ response at the AGM. Annual General Meeting Notice of the AGM is included in this newsletter. Following a brief report from the Committee we can look forward to an interesting presentation from Mr. Jim Lynch QSM, the founder of Zealandia. Jim’s topic will be “The Changing Ecology of Greater Wellington.” Thanks Thanks to honorary editor Jackie Pope, assistant honorary editor Val Browning, regular contributor Judith Doyle and others who have contributed to this issue of Bay View. This publication is made possible by the financial support we receive from our advertisers. Please give them your support in return. We also acknowledge the financial contribution from the Wellington City Council. On behalf of the Executive Committee Colin Blair, President JUDITH DOYLE OBRA is fortunate to have Judith Doyle as a meme=ber and regular contributor to “Bay View.” Judith Doyle is an award-winning travel writer. In 1990 she was named NZ Travel Writer of the Year and she won the Pacific Asia Travel Story Gold Award in 1993. Many of her publications draw on her experience and love of travel and outdoor activities. Older and Bolder (2004) recounts Judith Doyle’s exploration of the New Zealand outdoors and various outdoor adventures, while Tea with my Tapas (2007) is a frank and often funny look at her travels in Spain. Please accept our grateful thanks Judith for the wonderful contributions you make. You do a marvellous job researching and each one has made interesting reading. FROM THE PAST — It is 50 years on 2 May since the last tram ran through the streets of Wellington – this para is from the Evening Post 2 May 1964. For the Love of Animals by Judith Doyle Local animal-lover, Barbara Gordon, is absolutely delighted with the recently opened SPCA premises in the Old Fever Hospital on Mt Victoria. She has volunteered for the SPCA for some 30 years now … and counting. Her involvement began in the 1970s at the increasingly-inadequate premises in Newtown. She was on the committee then and included dog-walking amongst her volunteering duties. After a short break, she became involved again three or four years ago. A long-time cat-lover (she has four cats in her Bayview home) she donated the Cat Wing in the new building. She is on the Board there and does a weekly stint on the front desk to help, direct and welcome visitors. After an 8-year battle to secure the premises, it’s easy to understand the joy of the staff, the volunteers and – not to forget – the animals who have been found to be much calmer and happier here. The new premises are three times the area of the old and much quieter, surrounded as they are by the open space and greenness of the Town Belt. The building has been earthquake-strengthened and refurbished at a cost of about $3.5million. The conversion is now virtually complete and Barbara pays tribute to Catherine Torrance who was project manager – “she did a marvellous job, she really did.” The building consists of an education centre and a veterinary wing with new hospital facilities where unwell animals undergo operations and are nursed back to health. Then there’s the extensive adoption area devoted to the everlasting quest to find permanent homes for the animals – there has been a 30% increase in adoptions since they moved to the new premises. Another long-term quest is for the finance still needed. “We have another million dollars to raise,” Barbara said. One of the fundraising events they encourage, is for others to hire part of the premises. “We have children’s parties up there; there’s a conference room for hire and animal-lovers could even have weddings up there!” There are plans for a dog-friendly cafe later on, too. The building is an attractive example of the Arts and Crafts style with its spreadeagled shape and long verandahs. It was built between 1918-1920 as a Fever Hospital for patients with infectious diseases. Many of those treated were Tb sufferers. Others were soldiers returning from World War I who had fallen victim to the influenza pandemic – more than 700 are said to have died from the flu in the Wellington region alone. In 1969 the name changed to the Chest Hospital which operated for 12 years before it closed. Seven years later the building became the Wellington Polytechnic Conservatory of Music and was used for rehearsals up to 1998. This was followed by many years of neglect, uncertainty, interspersed by hopeful plans by the SPCA that petered out. The buildings were getting more and more derelict. But finally the WCC and the SPCA came to an agreement and renovations got going smartly. The grand opening was held in February of this year. Table Tennis Club Started A daytime table tennis group has been established at the stadium on Mt Victoria. Play is on Monday mornings and Wednesday afternoons. There are 10 tables – room for more members. Bats and balls are provided initially and the first day is free. It’s a game that can be continued into the senior years. In fact, a heart imaging specialist in America has been researching the benefits of playing social table tennis and claims that it not only exercises every part of the body but also activates the brain. Developing ball skills improves eve/hand co-ordination, balance, flexibility, reactions and quickness of mind, he reported, as well as increasing the heart rate and strengthening the heart and the muscles of the body. There’s no subscription – it’s $4 per session including refreshments. Phone Diana on 801-9556 or email Winnich@xtra.co.nz -Ed. WRITING ABOUT CHURCHILL By Wyn Beasley There have been mountains of books about Churchill over the years, but not too many have emanated from New Zealand; and there had been only one about his health when, in 2004, my copy of Churchill: a life arrived from the Folio Society. As I read this ‘short version’ of the official biography which had occupied first son Randolph and then Martin Gilbert for twenty-odd years, I realised two things: that it included mention of a multitude of injuries and ailments that should have killed Winston Churchill long before he reached the age of 90; and that the existing book about his health left a bit to be desired. That had been written by his personal physician from 1940, Sir Charles Wilson, who became Lord Moran, and it was controversial at the time it was published, because it breached patient confidentiality and had been brought out with almost indecent haste after its subject’s death. But over the years it had acquired a gloss of ‘authenticity’ and had contributed to the emergence of two durable Churchill myths: that Churchill had suffered from depression-as-a-disease and was close to being an alcoholic. As I started to study Churchill’s ailments in more detail, I began to uncover more that was dubious in the Moran version, which its author had called Churchill: the struggle for survival. His story did not stack up in places: it claimed to have been derived ‘from the diaries of Lord Moran’ and individual entries were headed with dates. But Martin Gilbert recorded that, when he tried to get the original diary entry for a particular date, he learned that there was no record of that date, and Moran’s papers ‘were not a diary in the ordinary sense of the word’. Then I came across an astonishing item in Moran’s book: describing an episode of pneumonia in 1943, he remarked, ‘Apart from his appendix, he had never been seriously ill, and his attention was caught by the high fever; his imagination did the rest.’ Now I had already documented a large collection of illnesses and injuries prior to 1943: these included episodes of childhood pneumonia in pre-antibiotic days when pneumonia was a killer; a hernia in childhood, a 9-metre fall from a tree which immobilised him for a couple of months; a shoulder dislocation which became recurrent; a car accident which paralysed him briefly, a paratyphoid infection from which he bled profusely.. I began to wonder what was going on – and the only explanation that holds water was that Moran wanted to document how he, the loyal physician, had kept a wreck of a prime minister alive from 1940 to 1965. So here we were with an 800-page book which might or might not be true, and there was obviously a place for a fuller and more reliable account – and preferably one shorter than 800 pages. I was fortunate enough to be able to spend a month in Cambridge in 2006, living in Churchill College and plundering the resources of their Archives Centre, which is the jewel in the crown of that college; and I have been favoured by the reminiscences of a number of people who were associated with Sir Winston. Myoid friend Sir Peter de la Billiere, who is an old boy of Harrow and remembers a Churchill visit to the school, not only contributed a foreword but was the catalyst of the whole project, and opened many doors for me. When I was wondering who might publish a book whose major market would be in England, I came across a book of drawings and reminiscences by Jack Chalker, who had been a prisoner of the Japanese on the infamous Burma railway and was recruited by the legendary Weary Dunlop as his masseur (but actually his artist) in the camp hospital. It was an interesting book because, apart from anything else, the artists who risked their lives making sketches of the conditions they were kept in, were to produce the only ‘hard evidence’ of their captivity – Chalker’S drawings were used at the Tokyo war trials. This was an interesting book, but also beautifully produced. On a whim I contacted the publisher, at Mells in Somerset, and found him interested. Charles Moore, the official biographer of Margaret Thatcher, gave it a kindly review in the Telegraph and the recent review in the New Zealand Listener has been encouraging. And now I have an offer to issue it as an e-book. It has been an interesting enterprise for an old ex-surgeon, serendipity all the way – and books, unlike patients, don’t get sick in the night. Churchill: the supreme survivor. Mercer Books, Mells, Somerset. 2013. Hardback; 200 pp, illustrated. Website: www.churchillsupremesurvivor.co.uk “ACHIEVING YOUR GOALS IS EASIER WITH THE RIGHT ADVICE” Local Wins Lifetime Achievement Award. Oriental Bay resident, Graham Stewart, is pictured here (left) receiving the National Press Club’s Lifetime Achievement Award from Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown and club vice-president, Peter Bush. Graham Stewart was the seventh recipient of this award. He was the first cameraman to receive the award which is only presented every five years “and I started with a box brownie,” he said. A few of Graham Stewart’s career highlights as a press photographer were outlined by the Mayor. They included his coverage of the 1951 waterfront strike, the pivotal post World War II labour relations and the terrible Tangiwai disaster. His photographic career started on the New Zealand Herald and continued on the provincial circuit before he returned to the Herald as illustrations editor. He held this position for many years. He later entered book publishing as an executive director of AH & AW Reed, the Wellington-based publishing house which used to be so dominant in the market. When Reeds faltered, the Mayor said, Graham seized the opportunity to start his own imprint, Grantham House. Non-fiction books on New Zealand and its cities were published, including two monumental works on Wellington. In uncertain publishing times, Grantham House continues to flourish. In his reply Graham Stewart described the early days of his 60 plus career, well before television and hourly radio news. “All newspaper people had to be correctly dressed – we all wore collar and tie even when covering rugby on the sideline,” he said. He went on to describe the cameras back then, which were “as large as a six-pack of beer”. Glass negative plates were used and, when on out-of-town assignments, changing bags with holes for the arms to be inserted had to be used. Before light meters came along, chemical and photographic formulas had to be mixed. For flash photography you had to use a handkerchief to remove a very hot bulb before replacing it with another. There was usually only one chance for a photo at VIP events, as you had to change the plate manually and re-cock the camera shutter – by which time the VIP in question could well have gone. He added some further historic events he’d covered – Royal tours of the 1950s; Sir Edmund Hillary’s wedding to Louise Rose; the last TEAL flying boat taking off for Sydney; the visit to New Zealand of Nat King Cole and also Vice-president Nixon. “I was present at the signing of the contract to build the Auckland harbour bridge … I was sitting in the co-pilot’s seat when dare-devil Freddie Ladd flew (illegally) under the bridge before the official opening”. In his early years in book publishing, book designers had to cut and paste with a scalpel every strip of typography on to each page of a book over a light box. They worked with long galleys of type produced on the old linotype machines. “Technology has certainly brought unbelievable changes to all forms of the printed word – and photography – since I started on the road.” The award ceremony took place late last year at the Wellington City Council THE BAY WALKERS – XMAS 2013 WALK by Susan Wagenhofer 5 years, or 260 Mondays ago I went on my first Oriental Bay Monday Morning Walk. That friend who opened this door for me has since moved up to Hawkes Bay. I miss her company and appreciate this legacy. It did not take long to realize how lucky I was to have landed an address on Oriental Parade in Oriental Bay. More than a parade of shops and flats, it is a close, vibrant (neighbourly) neighbourhood. Unlike other neighbourhoods, everyone here lives on the same side of the street and shares the same view, though not always the same viewpoint. The Monday Morning Walkers, a diverse and energetic group of women total approximately 21. Men are discouraged. Walks are vigorous, fast paced and hilly. Every walk is a good one and starts the week off with resolve. Wind direction and a cafe are serious things to consider when deciding the route. Coffee plays an essential role. A long black had better be hot, a decent cremora must be apparent, and cappuccino w/chocolate, whether trim or regular should not be forgotten. I could never miss a Monday Walk, or I would never have known which restaurant to try, or what part of New Zealand I should visit next, or who was in and out in politics. More books, films, art exhibitions (in and out of the country), ballets and trips abroad have been discussed. Many global & health problems were solved while heaving ourselves up through the bush to Mt Vic. or careening along the fox line in Brooklyn’s Central Park. This group had been walking many years before I stumbled onto them and their established traditions. The annual Christmas Walk held each December unites this group and is the only walk where everyone comes on the day. It is more of an amble where all catch up with each other en masse. Each Christmas Walk is memorable, probably most memorable for the three women slated each year having the task of planning the route and organizing the lunch. Where we go, how we go and where we eat are closely guarded secrets until THE DAY. No spoilers allowed. December 2013′s IT GIRLS, Viv Callendar, Cathy Kennedy-Good, and Annabel Leask orchestrated an exceptional Team Christmas Walk. One Monday, in early December, we trooped to Central Station commandeered the rail car to Silver Stream and continued on our way. Crossing the bridge we cut across fields in the sun onto the St Patrick’s College campus. Ahead, in the shade of trees r an impromptu outdoor cafe was assembled, complete with tablecloth, steaming coffee in blue and white cups, juice, platters of strawberries, cherries and cheese biscuits (All wanted the recipe) Julie O’Connor stationed here with Faith Taylor, efficient baristas provided morning tea. On we walked, past the golf course, through Barton’s Bush, down garden alleyways and paths opening up into a private back garden. No lunch in sight, another red herring. This was the champagne stop. Just a few minutes on, the trail ended at the Fig Cafe in Lower Hutt. This former church fellowship hall sat prepped, ready for us and for Christmas. A long banquet table lined one wall set for our lunch. A ninjas appeared with generous bowls and platters of well -dressed salads, tasty savoury quiches and breads. Good food, good wine and especially good company marked the day. Back onto the train and into Wellington this group of long time and comfortable friends enjoyed a day they will continue to share. I will leave New Zealand in June and return to the United States. Fortunately, they have Mondays there also. The Vermont branch of the Monday Morning Oriental Bay Walkers will be in full swing by September. All are welcome (no men). INTERESTING TITBITS ABOUT WAITANGI PARK by Renee Sara While surfing the net one day, I came across some interesting information about our wonderful Waitangi Park on Wellington Waterfront’s website, www.wellingtonwaterfront.co.nz. It all started from a Google search when I was wondering how come Waitangi Park was still beautifully green when Wellington City Council had stopped watering other parks in the city. You may remember the summer we were all urged to conserve water. I know this is something we rain-rich Wellingtonians don’t normally have as front-of-mind, despite the fact that we should always be conscious of our use of such a precious resource, but this time – we were warned – we were at a crisis point as we only had one emergency reservoir in Upper Hutt (the other one was getting an upgrade). What I found is that Waitangi Park isn’t just useful and attractive; its design is also very practical – which meant that all Oriental Bay Residents continued to enjoy beautiful green grass and happy trees when all other council parks were getting very very brown. It all starts with the Waitangi Stream – an important fresh water resource once used by the local Maori for catching eel (tuna) as they were heading out to sea. The designers “daylighted” the Waitangi Stream, bringing it above ground and channelling it through both artificial and natural treatment systems, treatment that includes the wetlands within the Park. Those lovely and full rain clouds we can get here in Wellington add to the stream’s generosity. In urban areas, often the first lot of rainwater runoff holds a lot of oils, hard material (such as rubbish people haven’t disposed of well) and other pollutants. Normally this flows directly into the sea via the stormwater systems all cities have. However, around Waitangi Park, the stormwaters are diverted to go through the same filtering systems as the stream goes through. This collected and cleaned water is then either used for irrigating Waitangi Park or it’s discharged in its much cleaner form into the harbour. And it doesn’t have to be immediately used or discarded. The wetlands operate as a storage lagoon for holding the water before it’s used to irrigate the park and the neighbouring plants. So 100% of Waitangi Park’s irrigation comes from renewable water sources, rather than the town supply. The next time you’re up early in the morning and see the sprinklers doing their stuff you can remember that, thanks to clever and sustainable design by the Wellington Waterfront, Waitangi Park and its environs isn’t just pretty; it’s good for the environment too. Love it! HOLOCAUST CENTRE OF NEW ZEALAND by Jackie Pope Why teach New Zealand children about the Holocaust? What relevance does the Holocaust have for New Zealanders? How did something like this happen? What can we do about it? These and other questions are addressed at the Holocaust Centre of New Zealand located in the Wellington Jewish Community Centre at 80 Webb Street. It aims to collect and share stories of New Zealand survivors, helpers and witnesses and works to promote individual responsibility and respect for diversity and human rights. It is open daily Sunday to Friday (except for Jewish and other holidays) from 10 am to 1 pm. Telephone 801 9480. There is a time-line showing events in Europe and events at the same time in New Zealand, folders indicating what the government knew about what was happening in Europe, what the New Zealand people knew, and what the Jewish community knew. Stories are told of New Zealand survivors of the Holocaust, their and their families’ lives before World War II, the war years, how they came to New Zealand, and their lives here post war. A letter from a New Zealand soldier details his horror at the conditions at one of the camps. Another display tells of the Deckstons, a childless Jewish couple who, seeing what was happening, travelled to Europe in the 1930s and brought 20 Jewish orphans to New Zealand. A number of thought provoking quotations, e.g., “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing.” (Edmund Burke) are depicted on the walls of the Centre. DVDs of survivor stories can be played. The Centre’s website www.holocaustcentre.org.nzgives links to other Holocaust centres all over the world. School groups are frequent visitors to the centre. The consequences of discrimination and bullying are readily discussed with them. Other community groups such as Probus, church groups, or Rotary clubs, as well as individual visitors are always welcome. HELPING US LOOK AFTER OUR PATCH by Judith Doyle Wellington City Council is to be congratulated in creating the new position of ‘graffiti programme advisor’. Hine Sullivan was appointed to the Wellington-wide role in 2013. Her prompt action in getting tagging removed from the popular zig-zag footpath between the Monastery and Oriental Bay has already earned her much appreciation from locals. Hine Sullivan was a Police Officer for 23 years. As a member of the community policinq section in Porirua in the late 90s early 2000s she worked to reduce graffiti in the central retail area. Duties included youth aid, youth education and community pollcinq. Over time, this led to less shoplifting, school truancy and car theft in Porirua. A diversion scheme was initiated, as part of this project, for offenders under 17 . This included cleaning off local graffiti, mowing lawns for elderly residents, community clean-ups and rubbish disposal – time allocated depended on the type of offence. “This made offenders accountable,” said Hine, “but it also gave police the chance to nip offending in the bud before it escalated. For many of the youth involved, this short sharp wake-up call was enough to stop their offending. “Police deployments in Solomon Islands, Bougainville (Papua New Guinea) and Tonga followed which led to her most recent position as security manager for World Vision International. Her job there was to monitor the safety and security of all World Vision staff working in the above three countries plus Vanuatu and Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor). It involved assessing security in the remote areas staff were working in and training staff to manage their own wellbeing during times of unrest. Though offered an extended term she returned home to support her 88-year-old father. In her new job as WCC graffiti advisor she wants to encourage residents and business owners to report concerns, like tagging, first to the Police, then the Council. She also wants to correct the perception that the Council will remove tagging at no cost to the owner of the building. To prevent tagging she encourages community-led projects, such as identifying areas for murals and developing ‘green’ walls with appropriate planting. She believes residents can help to discourage graffiti by: • improved lighting • trimming trees • joining neighbourhood groups and getting to know neighbour • reporting offences/suspicious persons to Police • clearing graffiti as soon as it appears. Experience shows that particular places which tend to attract tagging include areas with a high volume of foot traffic; walkways; poorly-lit areas and sites not visible to the general public. MARKING A LANDING SITE ON THE BAY by Judith Doyle At the city-end of Oriental Bay is Te Waka Pou, the pole marking what was once a waka landing site. By Ra Vincent, it was installed six years ago and has become a distinctive feature of Oriental Bay in that time. It combines stylised waka prows made with two totara beams. These are linked by ornate bronze koru patterns which suggest water effects. It sits on a base of volcanic rock (andesite) from Taranaki. It certainly makes a striking statement by Chaffers Marina – a symbolic beacon for those sailing into the harbour. The sculpture’s artist, Ra Vincent, is also responsible for two other sculptures on the waterfront. One – on the south side of the boardwalk at the corner of Lambton Quay and Molesworth Street – also represents a waka. This one, of white cement and marble, depicts a waka that has been upended at the end of the day’s use. His third waterfront sculpture is an anchor stone. Positioned in Civic Square, it is carved from Taranaki andesite. To suggest age and frequent use it is polished around the hole where the rope goes. It commemorates the location’s earlier function as a fishing spot. Ra Vincent is one of three men (with Simon Bright and Dan Hennah) from the Hobbit production design team who were nominated for the 2014 Academy Awards for their work on the set of the first Hobbit movie. They missed out on that elusive Oscar but being nominated is no small feat in itself. Ra is set decorator on the Hobbit Trilogy, so there’ll probably be a next time! ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC COMMITTEE 2013 —2014 President: Colin Blair Vice-President: John Larkindale Minute Secretary: Renee Sara Hon Treasurer: David Hogg Committee Everard Aspell Kay Austad Val Browning Maurice Clark Peter Hatfield Jackie Pope John Prendergast Andy Thomson LIST OF MEMBERS: 31 MARCH 2014 Life Member: Mrs Jane Aim Mr JK Alexander Mrs Jill Allen Athol & Glenys Arthur Mr & Mrs David & Justine Ashe Everard & Antonella Aspell David & Anke Atkins Kay Austad Dr & Mrs W Austad Yvonne Bacon Elizabeth Barrett Virginia Barton Chapple Mr & Mrs AW & AM Beasley Mr & Mrs Brian & Sylvia Bennett Jenny & Phil Bentley Trevor & Moreen Beyer David & Madeleine Black Colin & Judy Blair Jan Bolton & Graeme Perry Eugene Bowen & Elizabeth Ellis Mrs Alison Bowie Max & Rosemary Bradford Virginia Breen Malcolm & Anita Brown Val & Dave Browning Anthony & Jean Byrne Nick & Mariana Calavrias Rodney & Vivien Callender Mike Camp & Anne Gaskell Mrs JC Campbell Jean Cashin Warren & Bev Charlton Rick & Lorraine Christie Mr RJ Christmas Kaye & Maurice Clark Les & Colleen Clark Ngaire Clark Mrs Gaynor Clarke Susie & Richard Clarke W & R Coffey Paul Coltart & Kerry Borewicz Lady P A Cooke G Corleison Logan Cowdell & Jessi Morgan Peter Cullen Ann & Rick Curtis John & Gill Davis Shirley Day C & P Diessl Robin Dossor Judith Doyle Diana Duff-Staniland Mark & Dorothy Dunajtschik Angela Duncan & Greg Cotmore Ms Joy Durrant Mr & Mrs DK & SM Emanuel Mr & Mrs David & Beth Evans Tim & Margaret Fairhall Anne & Richard Field Mrs Margaret Findlay Annette Finlayson Mrs Vicky Floratos Denis Foot & Sue Kedgley Molli & Michael Gibbs-Harris Sheryn Gieck Arch Gilchrist Rona Glover Ross & Lynda Graham Mrs Marion Grant Mr & Mrs Douglas & Adrienne Gribben John & Pauline Hanning Clemency Harding-Brow Mrs Pauline Hastings Peter Hatfield & Suzanne Blumhardt Mr & Mrs Douglas & Helene Hay Tore Hayward & Victoria Stace Pieter Hibma David & Margaret Hogg Peter Hollier Mark Horgan Mark & Gillian Horton Jan & Malcolm Hughes Carl & Valerie Jackson Brendon Jacobsen Stuart & Trish Jameson Mr & Mrs George & Judy Janis Joan Jarden Sir John Jeffries Pamela Jeffries Richard & Nicky Johnson Mr & Mrs Bryan Johnson Sue Johnstone Mr & Mrs Peter & Lesley Jones Mrs Barbara Kedgley Mr & Mrs Len & Eileen Kenna Mrs M K Keyes Erika Kremic Mrs Ruth Lane John & Philippa Larkindale Mr & Mrs Peter & Jill Lemmon Bruce & Gwen Levick David Levick Mrs Robin Lockie Hon John Luxton & Ms Mary Scholtens Brian & Jan Lynch Mr & Mrs Peter & Margaret MacDonald Don & Maria Mackay Mr & Mrs Jim & Joan Malcolm Mr & Mrs Roger & Sherry Manthel Maurice & Lynne Manttan Mrs S J Martin Ross & Treena Martin Mr & Mrs H & R Matias Mr & Mrs RB & VP McCay Mr & Mrs J & MP McIlwaine John & Erica McLean Murray & Sue McNae Jim Meachen Mr & Mrs B & P Melville Mrs PM Miles Roger & Alex Miller Duncan Milne & Claire Campbell Mrs Pauline Mitchell Gareth & Jo Morgan Richard & Jenny Nanson Mr & Mrs OR & DM Nees Mike & Jude Nelson Mr and Mrs Tom & Dorothy Neve Andy Newport Mrs Judith Newport Deb & Matt Nichols Rex Nicholls & Kerry Prendergast Mary & Rod Oakly Janet Okkerse & Tony Hamilton David & Kate Ongley Brian & Anne O’Sullivan Mr & Mrs I.C. Patience Mr Frank Pearson Miss Kathleen Phelan Capt MC & JM Pinnell WH & EL Pitt Euan & Linda Playle John & Jill Prendergast Rod & Di Preston Mr & Mrs Bryan & Anna Pocock Joe & Jackie Pope Barry & Francie Possenniskie Collin Post Mrs Ann Rendel Dave & Jan Renwick Audrey Richter Alastair & Marilyn Roger Mr & Mrs Henk & Mineke Rood Mr & Mrs Ron & Jan Rosenberg Kushla Roughton & Nigel Moody Valerie & John Roy Mr & Mrs Garry & Janice Rudings Arthur & Janet Salek Jacinda & Derek Samuel Brian & Renee Sara Mr & Mrs GEK Sare Mrs Grace N Scarrott Don & Pat Scott Mrs Merilyn Scott Anne Selwyn Mr & Mrs R & C Selwyn Lesley & Michael Shanahan Mr & Mrs GR & AC Sharp Helen Shaw A & G Short Peter Smith Ms Adrienne Smith Paul Spackman Hilda & Geoff Stedman Mr & Mrs Graham & Anne Stewart Mr & Mrs Ian & Heather Stewart Richard Stone Gordon & Kathryn Swan Alison Sweetman Chris & Robyn Sygrove Mrs P D Symes Walter & Michelle Szeto John & Odette Tait Mrs Faith Taylor Tony & Julie Thomas Andy & Sue Thomson Ed Tingey & Helen Foot Warren Tocker & Karen McLeay Helen Todd John & Tina Todd Mrs Krystine Tomaszyk Mr & Mrs Peter & Judy Travers Mr & Mrs Peter & Theadora Varuhas Margaret Waddy Drs Freda Walker & Donald Poirier Mr & Mrs Peter & Beryl Warnock Sharryn Waters Mr & Mrs EC Watson Peter & Jill Watson Bryan & Patricia Watts Mike & Liz Welch Jeanette & Terry Wellington Joan Wells Miss G L West George & Jeanette Westermayer Bryan & Jill Weyburne David Whittaker & Robyn Trail Kay & Glen Wiggs Sally & Chris Wilkinson Mrs Ngaire Williams Diana Winn Ron & Jane Woodrow Jane Wrightson Annabel Young James & Mary Elizabeth Young Dom & Carole Zame Members’ Comments & Suggestions The Committee is keen to hear your opinions and comments about life
in the Bay. Any issues that you think should be brought to our attention do let us know. Send your suggestion to the President. I wish to join your Association (Sub $15 single / $20 double) Name: Address: Post to:
 The Treasurer 
Oriental Bay Residents’ Assn Inc #          #          #

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        • 31 Oct 2013
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 062, November 2013 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc Notice is hereby given that a General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Oriental Parade at 7.30 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 061
        • 30 Apr 2013
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 061, May 2013 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Oriental Parade
At 7.30 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 059
        • 30 Apr 2012
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 059, May 2012 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room, Oriental Parade At 7.30pm … Continue reading

      • Bay View 058
        • 31 Oct 2011
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 058, November 2011 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room Oriental Parade at 7.30pm … Continue reading

      • Bay View 057
        • 30 Apr 2011
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 057, May 2011 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room, Oriental Parade At 7.30 pm on WEDNESDAY 1st JUNE … Continue reading

      • Bay View 056
        • 31 Oct 2010
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 056, November 2010 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room, Oriental Parade at 7.30pm on THURSDAY 25 NOVEMBER 2010 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 055
        • 30 Apr 2010
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 055, May 2010 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Wardroom of the Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Oriental Parade At 7.30 pm … Continue reading

      • Bay View 054
        • 31 Oct 2009
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 054, November 2009 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room Oriental Parade at 7.30pm on THURSDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2009 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 053
        • 31 Mar 2009
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 053, April 2009 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Rooms Oriental Parade at 7.30 pm on THURSDAY 28 MAY … Continue reading

      • Bay View 052
        • 31 Oct 2008
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 052, November 2008 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Room Oriental Parade at 7.30pm on THURSDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2008 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 051
        • 31 Mar 2008
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 051, April 2008 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Rooms Oriental Parade on WEDNESDAY 28 MAY 2008 The Executive … Continue reading

      • Bay View 050
        • 31 Oct 2007
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 050, November 2007 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Rooms Oriental Parade at 7.30pm on THURSDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2007 … Continue reading

      • Bay View 049
        • 31 Mar 2007
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 049, April 2007 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS’ ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Band Rotunda Meeting Rooms, Oriental Parade on THURSDAY, 31 MAY 2007 The Executive … Continue reading

      • Bay View 048
        • 31 Oct 2006
        • Oriental Bay Residents’ Association
        • The Bay View, Issue 048, November 2006 Official Bulletin of the Oriental Bay Residents’ Association Inc. Notice is hereby given that the Biannual General Meeting of the ORIENTAL BAY RESIDENTS’ ASSOCIATION Inc will be held in The Overseas Terminal at 7.00 pm on WEDNESDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2006 7.00pm: Get-together (cash … Continue reading

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